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Old 01-09-2013, 05:54 AM   #1
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How Would You Describe/Define Baha'i Culture?

Given that most religions tend to inculcate and spawn a culture that is relatively unique to it given the similarity between their worshipers in terms of beliefs, cultural norms, expectations, values, pressure, language, diet and so forth. With this in mind how then can one describe Baha'i culture?

How is Baha'i culture different from Christian/Jewish or Islamic cultures?
 
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:40 AM   #2
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I'm not sure that you can define "Baha'i culture" yet. It seems too soon to me. I don't think there's been enough time for a distinct separation from our existing culture.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 12:47 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sycamore View Post
Given that most religions tend to inculcate and spawn a culture that is relatively unique to it given the similarity between their worshipers in terms of beliefs, cultural norms, expectations, values, pressure, language, diet and so forth. With this in mind how then can one describe Baha'i culture?

How is Baha'i culture different from Christian/Jewish or Islamic cultures?
I don't believe there is a Christian, or Islamic culture. Rather there are Christian components that are found in cultures; Islamic components that are found in cultures.
 
Old 01-09-2013, 01:14 PM   #4
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My view is that it takes time to "acculturate" Baha'i values... Some people may take longer than others.

But some of the values could include the following..

The value of working in a group or community as opposed to being so individualistic and me first idea.

Another value might be seeing things in a more global perspective as opposed to past cultures that were more nationalistic.."my country right or wrong"

A third values I think is avoiding polarizing and prolonged debates and arguments.

Consultation is another skill that could be a cultural value to resolve conflicts.

I'm sure there are many more..

 
Old 01-10-2013, 11:27 AM   #5
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The Bahá'i Faith is such an early religion that it cannot be classified to have any cultural significance. However, Jewish, Islamic, Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, and other world religions have influenced cultures of many places such as the culture of the Indonesian peoples whose trades with early Arabs in the Dark Ages have influenced their cultures with Islamic values or the British cultures influenced by Christian beliefs. The language of every culture is mostly influenced by these old religion. For example, in Farsi, goodbye is translated to the closest English pronunciation "Khoda-Hafez" which literally means "God be with you". In Spanish, "adiós" has a literal translation of "Godspeed". Such significance in the latter is influenced by Christianity's belief in one God.

Members of the Baha'i Faith usually greet each other by saying "Alláh'u'Abhá" which is translated from Arabic "God is Most Glorious". And according to the Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Bahá'u'lláh asked Bahá'ís to repeat "Alláh'u'Abhá" 95 times a day:

18
It hath been ordained that every believer in God,
the Lord of Judgement, shall, each day, having washed
his hands and then his face, seat himself and, turning
unto God, repeat "Allah-u-Abha" ninety-five times.
Such was the decree of the Maker of the Heavens when,
with majesty and power, He established Himself upon
the thrones of His Names. Perform ye, likewise,
ablutions for the Obligatory Prayer; this is the
command of God, the Incomparable, the Unrestrained.

(Baha'u'llah, The Kitab-i-Aqdas, p. 25)
 
Old 01-11-2013, 04:36 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khodrat View Post
The Bahá'i Faith is such an early religion that it cannot be classified to have any cultural significance.
You may want to call it a "new religion" rather than an "early" one as that term makes it sound extremely ancient, like (for example) Sabaeanism.

Quote:
In Spanish, "adiós" has a literal translation of "Godspeed".
In fact, it literally means "to God": no speed implied....

Peace, :-)

Bruce

Last edited by BruceDLimber; 01-12-2013 at 07:10 AM.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 03:22 PM   #7
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Or a 'young' religion..
 
Old 01-11-2013, 04:07 PM   #8
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I don't know about culture but there are certain common denominators between bahai
 
Old 01-11-2013, 08:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sycamore View Post
Given that most religions tend to inculcate and spawn a culture that is relatively unique to it given the similarity between their worshipers in terms of beliefs, cultural norms, expectations, values, pressure, language, diet and so forth. With this in mind how then can one describe Baha'i culture?

How is Baha'i culture different from Christian/Jewish or Islamic cultures?
I think we will have to have a Baha'i commonwealth before we know what a Baha'i culture might look like.
 
Old 06-20-2013, 02:40 AM   #10
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Baha'i culture, Christian culture, indeed, any culture when viewed over many decades, is a changing one. My book of 650 pages, in font 14, with 230 thousand words contains reflections and understandings regarding the new Bahá'í culture of learning and growth, what amounts to a paradigmatic shift, in the Baha’i community which it has been going through since the mid-1990s.

This newest, this latest, of the Abrahamic religions, has been developing a new culture in the last two decades, from 1996 to 2016. This new culture or paradigm will be developing in the decades ahead at least until 2044, the end of the second century of the Bahá'í Era(1844 to 2044), and perhaps beyond into that third century, 2044 to 2144. Time will tell when the next paradigmatic shift will take place in the international Bahá'í. Go to the following link to skim or scan those parts of this book of interest to you.-Ron Price
------------------------
Reflections on a Culture of Learning and Growth: Community and Individual Paradigm Shifts

Last edited by RonPrice; 06-29-2013 at 12:15 AM. Reason: to update the post
 
Old 07-02-2013, 12:56 PM   #11
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I would love to see a culture of personal growth climaxing in the understanding of Humility and ones utter nothingness before others.

A complete shift away from this worlds ideas of power, position and knowledge.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 12:59 PM   #12
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Good perspective

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Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
I would love to see a culture of personal growth climaxing in the understanding of Humility and ones utter nothingness before others.

A complete shift away from this worlds ideas of power, position and knowledge.
Bill,
The absolute opposite, for example, of political culture, Hollywood, Las Vegas, and all the other vain imaginings...
A "culture of service" Huh? What's that??
 
Old 07-02-2013, 01:54 PM   #13
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It's too early for a distinct "culture" around the faith to have emerged.

Also, there are still too few Baha'is. I'm the only one in my town of current residents, and even "big" Baha'i assemblies usually make up only a tiny percentage of the surrounding community, state or nation.

I'm a guy from Wyoming -- so I look, act and sound pretty much like a guy from Wyoming -- right down to the 26-year-old pickup truck with scraggly dogs in the back. In other words, I reflect the surrounding culture.

It would only be if you were to have a conversation with me about a topic such as religion, or my thoughts on the future of humanity that you might sense anything "different" about me.
 
Old 07-02-2013, 09:21 PM   #14
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Differences

... guy from Wyoming -- so I look, act and sound pretty much like a guy from Wyoming -- right down to the 26-year-old pickup truck with scraggly dogs in the back. In other words, I reflect the surrounding culture.

It would only be if you were to have a conversation with me about a topic such as religion, or my thoughts on the future of humanity that you might sense anything "different" about me.[/QUOTE]

>>>> I hear ya friend. Bill Sears said something to the effect of looking like a blueberry on a white plate. I forget the context, but in the physical world, we all look pretty much alike.
Then again in the spiritual world, what are we doing/teaching/ saying, to draw attention to this "new thing" we are a part of called: The Baha'i Faith.

Maybe go to a rodeo, sit on a horse, and instead of saying Yipee Ki Yay, Hollar: Ya Sahib u Zaman!!!

That'll get somebody's attention... ;-)
 
Old 07-03-2013, 07:46 AM   #15
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I anticipate a primarily Baha'i Culture would reflect many aspects of past spiritually-centered cultures, but on a global scale.

• Emphasis on service, instead of individual "achievement."
• Far less emphasis on the amassing of material possession as a measure of "success."
• The first two will lead to simpler, slower-paced, much less stressful living.
• Far less obsession with sexuality and other hedonistic pleasures (but without an unhealthy puritan fear or revulsion toward such things.)
• The elimination of xenophobia and tribalism.


... to name just a few.
 
Old 07-03-2013, 07:48 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by dale ramsdell View Post
... guy from Wyoming -- so I look, act and sound pretty much like a guy from Wyoming -- right down to the 26-year-old pickup truck with scraggly dogs in the back. In other words, I reflect the surrounding culture.

It would only be if you were to have a conversation with me about a topic such as religion, or my thoughts on the future of humanity that you might sense anything "different" about me.
>>>> I hear ya friend. Bill Sears said something to the effect of looking like a blueberry on a white plate. I forget the context, but in the physical world, we all look pretty much alike.
Then again in the spiritual world, what are we doing/teaching/ saying, to draw attention to this "new thing" we are a part of called: The Baha'i Faith.

Maybe go to a rodeo, sit on a horse, and instead of saying Yipee Ki Yay, Hollar: Ya Sahib u Zaman!!!

That'll get somebody's attention... ;-)[/QUOTE]

Ha... I'll bet.

Western culture has many good aspects, and I'm proud of those traditions. But, it can also be a wee bit on the close-minded side.
 
Old 07-03-2013, 09:12 AM   #17
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Well fed, fat and happy!

Western culture has many good aspects, and I'm proud of those traditions. But, it can also be a wee bit on the close-minded side. [/QUOTE]

>>> It certainly does. The rest of the world is envious. Yet there is a reason for the close-minded side. When people are well fed, fat and happy, and everybody thinks life is just about drinking beer and watching football on TV, essentially insulated within a comfort zone, not feeling pangs of hunger or the heat of napalm nearby, there is no motivation to seek God.

“O ye peoples of the world! Know, verily, that an unforeseen calamity followeth you, and grievous retribution awaiteth you. Think not that which ye have committed hath been effaced in My sight.”

And again: “We have a fixed time for you, O peoples. If ye fail, at the appointed hour, to turn towards God, He, verily, will lay violent hold on you, and will cause grievous afflictions to assail you from every direction. How severe, indeed, is the chastisement with which your Lord will then chastise you!”
 
Old 07-03-2013, 09:39 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by dale ramsdell View Post
Western culture has many good aspects, and I'm proud of those traditions. But, it can also be a wee bit on the close-minded side.
>>> It certainly does. The rest of the world is envious. Yet there is a reason for the close-minded side. When people are well fed, fat and happy, and everybody thinks life is just about drinking beer and watching football on TV, essentially insulated within a comfort zone, not feeling pangs of hunger or the heat of napalm nearby, there is no motivation to seek God.

“O ye peoples of the world! Know, verily, that an unforeseen calamity followeth you, and grievous retribution awaiteth you. Think not that which ye have committed hath been effaced in My sight.”

And again: “We have a fixed time for you, O peoples. If ye fail, at the appointed hour, to turn towards God, He, verily, will lay violent hold on you, and will cause grievous afflictions to assail you from every direction. How severe, indeed, is the chastisement with which your Lord will then chastise you!”[/QUOTE]

All true.

But by "Western" culture, I meant and should have been more specific: As in my particular culture. That being, American Rocky Mountain Western culture.

Commonly called or thought of a "cowboy culture," although I would argue, that's a misnomer, because the cowboy/ranch lifestyle is merely one aspect of this culture.

Anyway, that's what I meant to say. And I repeat, while it's a culture with many fine aspects to it (such as a strong emphasis on hard work, honor and self-sufficenty) -- it can also be close-minded and even xenophobic.
 
Old 07-03-2013, 01:12 PM   #19
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'Though I don't think this answers the original poster's question as to how Baha'i culture differs from that of say Christianity, I thought it a worthy addition to the conversation.


'...you must conduct and deport yourselves in such a manner that you may stand out among other souls distinguished by a brilliancy like unto the sun. If any one of you enters a city he must become the center of attraction because of the sincerity, faithfulness, love, honesty, fidelity, truthfulness and loving-kindness of his disposition and nature toward all the inhabitants of the world, that the people of the city may all cry out: "This person is unquestionably a Bahá'í; for his manners, his behavior, his conduct, his morals, his nature and his disposition are of the attributes of the Bahá'ís." Until you do attain to this station, you have not fulfilled the Covenant and the Testament of God. For according to the irrefutable texts, He has taken from us a firm covenant that we may live and act in accord with the divine exhortations, commands and lordly teachings.'

(Abdu'l-Baha, Baha'i World Faith - Abdu'l-Baha Section, p. 400)
 
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