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Old 06-18-2015, 08:03 AM   #1
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Fate of those who persecuted the Bab & His Shrine

The fate of Those Who Persecuted the Bab, Who Opposed the Construction of His Shrine and Threatened Its Destruction:


Muhammad Shah, who disregarded the appeal of the Bab to meet Him in person and plead His Cause, sustained a sudden reverse of fortune, and succumbed, at the age of forty, to a complication of maladies.

Nasiri’d-Din Shah, during whose reign the Bab was executed, and under whose aegis the greatest massacre of the Babis took place, was, in the plenitude of his power, dramatically assassinated on the eve of his jubilee. The Qajar dynasty, to which he belonged, was subsequently brought to an ignominious end.

Haji Mirza Aqasi, the Grand Vazir of Muhammad Shah and chief instigator of the outrages perpetrated against the Bab, was disgraced by his sovereign, lost his fortune, was expelled to Karbila, and became a victim of disease and poverty.

Miza Taqi Khan, the Amir Nizam, the Grand Vazir of Nasiri'd-Din Shah, who was directly responsible for the execution of the Bab, was disgraced and put to death by royal order in the bath of the Palace of Fin, near Kashan.

Mirza Hasan Khan, who carried out the execution of the Bab, was subjected, two years after, to a dreadful punishment which ended in his death.

Miza ‘Ali-Asghar, the Shaykhu’l-Islam of Tabriz, who inflicted the bastinado on the Bab with his own hand, was stricken, in that same year, with paralysis, and died a miserable death.

The Regiment, which constituted the firing squad that executed the Bab, lost, in that same year, two hundred and fifty of its officers and men in an earthquake near Ardibil, while the remaining five hundred were shot, two years later, in Tabriz, for mutiny. The head of the regiment, Aqa Jan Big, lost his life, six years after the Martyrdom of the Bab, during the bombardment of Muhammarih by the British.

The Shi’ih Sacerdotal, which violently opposed the Bab, aroused the populace and instigated the government against Him, was discredited, fell from power, and ceased to exercise its paramount influence on both the people and the government.

Sultan ‘Abdu’l-Hamid, who lent his support to the enemies of the Faith in their efforts to obstruct the construction of the Shrine of the Bab was deposed and made a prisoner of state. The Caliphate was subsequently abolished and the Sultanate ceased to exist.

The Four Members of the Commission of Inquiry, who were appointed by 'Abdu'l-Hamid to investigate the activities of 'Abdu'l-Baha, and who misrepresented the Shrine of the Bab as a fortress and vast ammunition depot on Mt. Carmel, suffered an ignominious fate, one being shot, another robbed of all his possessions, the third exiled, and the fourth sinking into abject poverty.

Jamal Pasha, the Turkish Commander-in-Chief, who threatened the destruction of the Holy Tomb, was defeated in battle, fled, and was slain while a refugee in the Caucasus.

Mirza Muhammad-‘Ali, the Arch-Breaker of the Covenant of Baha'u'llah, who was the chief instigator of the enemies of 'Abdu'l-Baha, and exerted his utmost to obstruct the construction of the Shrine of the Bab, was stricken with paralysis, and lived to see every hope he had cherished dashed to the ground.

The Invading Forces of Field Marshal Rommel, whose threat to Alexandria constituted the gravest danger to the Holy Land, and whose victory would have precipitated the direst crisis in the fortunes of the Faith at its World Centre, and imperilled its institutions, was routed from the continent of Africa, and the peril of a regime inimical to the Faith removed forever.

The Arab Community living in the neighbourhood of the Shrine of the Bab, which violated the sacredness of its precincts, in the course of the disturbances in the Holy Land, and supported the schemes of the ex-Mufti of Jerusalem, who had threatened to extirpate the Faith, fled in ignominy and joined the great army of refugees that was seeking shelter in the adjoining territories.

-The Baha’i Faith 1844 -1963, Statistical and Comparative, Compiled by the Hands of the Cause Residing in the Holy Land
 
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Old 06-18-2015, 08:42 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh View Post
Haji Mirza Aqasi, the Grand Vazir of Muhammad Shah and chief instigator of the outrages perpetrated against the Bab, was disgraced by his sovereign, lost his fortune, was expelled to Karbila, and became a victim of disease and poverty.
Now this guy right here . . . very naughty. See the Baha'i Encyclopedia below to read about how the Bab had a real shot at converting the shah. That is, until Haji Mirza Aqasi played his hand.
"He [Aqasi] seems to have remained unconcerned about the rise of the Bábí movement between 1844 and 1846, but the Báb’s growing renown finally triggered Aqasi’s fear that the shah, who was curious about the claims of the youthful and charismatic religious leader, might be influenced by Him. These fears could only have been intensified when Aqasi learned that the Báb had won over the redoubtable governor of Isfahan, Manúchihr Khán, in 1846.

Seeking to discredit the Báb in the shah’s eyes, Haji Mirza Aqasi incited the mullás of Isfahan to condemn the Báb. The shah subsequently summoned the Báb to Tehran. Manúchihr Khán, however, concerned for the Báb’s safety, managed to keep Him in Isfahan for four months. Then, early in 1847, Manúchihr Khán died suddenly. He had expressed a desire to convert the shah, but he died unexpectedly before he could act on his intention.

When it became apparent that Manúchihr Khán had been keeping the Báb safe in Isfahan, the shah again summoned the Báb to Tehran. While the Báb was en route, Haji Mirza Aqasi instructed Him to break his journey by stopping in the village of Kulayn, less than fifty kilometers (thirty-one miles) from Tehran. Aqasi, who owned the village, had a tent pitched for the Báb in pleasant surroundings. After weeks had passed, the Báb wrote a letter to the shah, requesting a meeting with the sovereign. Determined that the meeting not take place, Haji Mirza Aqasi instilled fear in the shah, saying that the Báb planned trouble and mischief, and also stressed that a meeting would be untimely because the shah was about to leave the capital. He managed to persuade Muhammad Shah that the best plan of action would be to send the Báb to the fortress of Mákú. The shah sent a letter to the Báb, dated March/April 1847, asking Him to proceed to Mákú. Shoghi Effendi has said that this letter, 'though couched in courteous terms, clearly indicated the extent of the baneful influence exercised by the Grand Vizir [Prime Minister] on his sovereign.'1 The Báb was being sent to Mákú as a prisoner; He would
remain a prisoner for the rest of His life
.

Last edited by ahanu; 06-18-2015 at 09:02 AM.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 10:54 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh View Post
The fate of Those Who Persecuted the Bab, Who Opposed the Construction of His Shrine and Threatened Its Destruction:


Muhammad Shah, who disregarded the appeal of the Bab to meet Him in person and plead His Cause, sustained a sudden reverse of fortune, and succumbed, at the age of forty, to a complication of maladies.

Nasiri’d-Din Shah, during whose reign the Bab was executed, and under whose aegis the greatest massacre of the Babis took place, was, in the plenitude of his power, dramatically assassinated on the eve of his jubilee. The Qajar dynasty, to which he belonged, was subsequently brought to an ignominious end.

Haji Mirza Aqasi, the Grand Vazir of Muhammad Shah and chief instigator of the outrages perpetrated against the Bab, was disgraced by his sovereign, lost his fortune, was expelled to Karbila, and became a victim of disease and poverty.

Miza Taqi Khan, the Amir Nizam, the Grand Vazir of Nasiri'd-Din Shah, who was directly responsible for the execution of the Bab, was disgraced and put to death by royal order in the bath of the Palace of Fin, near Kashan.

Mirza Hasan Khan, who carried out the execution of the Bab, was subjected, two years after, to a dreadful punishment which ended in his death.

Miza ‘Ali-Asghar, the Shaykhu’l-Islam of Tabriz, who inflicted the bastinado on the Bab with his own hand, was stricken, in that same year, with paralysis, and died a miserable death.

The Regiment, which constituted the firing squad that executed the Bab, lost, in that same year, two hundred and fifty of its officers and men in an earthquake near Ardibil, while the remaining five hundred were shot, two years later, in Tabriz, for mutiny. The head of the regiment, Aqa Jan Big, lost his life, six years after the Martyrdom of the Bab, during the bombardment of Muhammarih by the British.

The Shi’ih Sacerdotal, which violently opposed the Bab, aroused the populace and instigated the government against Him, was discredited, fell from power, and ceased to exercise its paramount influence on both the people and the government.

Sultan ‘Abdu’l-Hamid, who lent his support to the enemies of the Faith in their efforts to obstruct the construction of the Shrine of the Bab was deposed and made a prisoner of state. The Caliphate was subsequently abolished and the Sultanate ceased to exist.

The Four Members of the Commission of Inquiry, who were appointed by 'Abdu'l-Hamid to investigate the activities of 'Abdu'l-Baha, and who misrepresented the Shrine of the Bab as a fortress and vast ammunition depot on Mt. Carmel, suffered an ignominious fate, one being shot, another robbed of all his possessions, the third exiled, and the fourth sinking into abject poverty.

Jamal Pasha, the Turkish Commander-in-Chief, who threatened the destruction of the Holy Tomb, was defeated in battle, fled, and was slain while a refugee in the Caucasus.

Mirza Muhammad-‘Ali, the Arch-Breaker of the Covenant of Baha'u'llah, who was the chief instigator of the enemies of 'Abdu'l-Baha, and exerted his utmost to obstruct the construction of the Shrine of the Bab, was stricken with paralysis, and lived to see every hope he had cherished dashed to the ground.

The Invading Forces of Field Marshal Rommel, whose threat to Alexandria constituted the gravest danger to the Holy Land, and whose victory would have precipitated the direst crisis in the fortunes of the Faith at its World Centre, and imperilled its institutions, was routed from the continent of Africa, and the peril of a regime inimical to the Faith removed forever.

The Arab Community living in the neighbourhood of the Shrine of the Bab, which violated the sacredness of its precincts, in the course of the disturbances in the Holy Land, and supported the schemes of the ex-Mufti of Jerusalem, who had threatened to extirpate the Faith, fled in ignominy and joined the great army of refugees that was seeking shelter in the adjoining territories.

-The Baha’i Faith 1844 -1963, Statistical and Comparative, Compiled by the Hands of the Cause Residing in the Holy Land
Yes, that thinking comes from God Passes By, where Shogh Effendi applies the idea of nemesis divina - that is that God already in this life punishes people for their wrongdoings. But one should be careful with it. What, for example, has the Bahá'í community of Iran done?

gnat
 
Old 06-23-2015, 07:49 AM   #4
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What was Queen Victoria's manner of reply? I am curious.
 
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