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Old 06-02-2017, 12:22 PM   #1
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A Story

There is a story in Rumi's Masnavi (Book V), I was reading some days ago. Then it came to my mind that it is talking about the change of religious laws and coming of the new manifestations from time to time. The stroy may be interesting to you. Here it is:

Once a great king brings a very precious stone; more precious than all his territory. Then he asks his minister, "tell me, how much do you think this stone worth?" and the minister says it worth more than the whole territory. then the king says, "now break it!" and the minister says, "But my lord! how can I break it? how can I break your most precious stone?" and thus he does not break. the king gives him money and jewels for his wisdom.
Then he (the king) asks consultant, "tell me, how much do you think this stone worth?" and the consultant says the same thing as the minister. The king then says, "now break it!" and the consultant, just like the minister says that he cannot break the king's precious stone.
thus, the king asks many people at the room to break the stone, and no one does. Finally it comes to the king's favorite servant. The king asks him, "tell me, how much do you think this stone worth, Ayaz?". Ayaz says, "My lord! it worth more than my tongue can say." The king says, "Now, break it" and Ayaz, without a second of thinking breaks the stone into a hundred pieces.
Everyone in the palace gets amazed and shocked. they call Ayaz an infidel, a brainless, stupid man who does not think about the king's stone. The call him "Kafir" and an unbeliever and a danger to the whole people. But the king says,
"Ayaz, is my most favorite. He is the one who did exactly as I asked him. He did not think about the worth of the stone. He did not think about me giving him jewels for not breaking it. He just did what I asked him, as sincerely as possible. and now you see, why a servant is my most favorite creature among you, all."

NOw, the precious stone is God's religion. The Muslims who cannot accept the Bahai religion are in fact unable to break the stone, even tho the King asks them to. The king may even reward some of them for not breaking the stone, but it is only the surface, for in reality, He wants us to do exactly as He asks us, without thinking of anything else.

Last edited by maryamr; 06-02-2017 at 12:24 PM.
 
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Old 06-03-2017, 01:01 AM   #2
Tony Bristow-Stagg
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maryamr View Post
There is a story in Rumi's Masnavi (Book V), I was reading some days ago. Then it came to my mind that it is talking about the change of religious laws and coming of the new manifestations from time to time. The stroy may be interesting to you. Here it is:

Once a great king brings a very precious stone; more precious than all his territory. Then he asks his minister, "tell me, how much do you think this stone worth?" and the minister says it worth more than the whole territory. then the king says, "now break it!" and the minister says, "But my lord! how can I break it? how can I break your most precious stone?" and thus he does not break. the king gives him money and jewels for his wisdom.
Then he (the king) asks consultant, "tell me, how much do you think this stone worth?" and the consultant says the same thing as the minister. The king then says, "now break it!" and the consultant, just like the minister says that he cannot break the king's precious stone.
thus, the king asks many people at the room to break the stone, and no one does. Finally it comes to the king's favorite servant. The king asks him, "tell me, how much do you think this stone worth, Ayaz?". Ayaz says, "My lord! it worth more than my tongue can say." The king says, "Now, break it" and Ayaz, without a second of thinking breaks the stone into a hundred pieces.
Everyone in the palace gets amazed and shocked. they call Ayaz an infidel, a brainless, stupid man who does not think about the king's stone. The call him "Kafir" and an unbeliever and a danger to the whole people. But the king says,
"Ayaz, is my most favorite. He is the one who did exactly as I asked him. He did not think about the worth of the stone. He did not think about me giving him jewels for not breaking it. He just did what I asked him, as sincerely as possible. and now you see, why a servant is my most favorite creature among you, all."

NOw, the precious stone is God's religion. The Muslims who cannot accept the Bahai religion are in fact unable to break the stone, even tho the King asks them to. The king may even reward some of them for not breaking the stone, but it is only the surface, for in reality, He wants us to do exactly as He asks us, without thinking of anything else.
Maryamr - Wonderful story - and good understanding given.

Can you also see a parallel with the story of the Martyrdom of the Bab?

Regards Tony
 
Old 06-06-2017, 08:25 AM   #3
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A sweet story, with a deep message. Thank you, maryarm!

It reminds me as well how nothing, neither our most cherished beliefs, possessions or achievements have intrinsic value.
The worth of everything depends on our connection with the Self-Subsisting, the King of Existence. With Him, everything fits into the right place.

Amazing!
 
Old 06-07-2017, 11:49 PM   #4
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Good morning maryamr

This is a wonderful selection from the works of Rumi. Thank you.

These words paint a picture, and it is said that a picture is worth a thousand word.

Romane
 
Old 06-08-2017, 12:00 AM   #5
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thank you Camchoe and Romane
Also thank you Tony. I have been unable to find a parallel with the story of the martyrdom of Bab until now. but if I can find, I will share it here
 
Old 06-08-2017, 12:11 AM   #6
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One story is in my mind which MAY fit the story of martyrdom of Bab in a good way.

it is from Masnavi, Book IV:

Once upon a time, there was a Sufi named Bayazid Bastami- a very famous Sufi who is praised a lot by Rumi and Attar. Anyway, he has some followers, and disciples.
One night, as they all had gathered around their master, and Bayazid was in a deep praying state, he suddenly (symbolically) went into the Fana State (Complete poverty of the physical self- last valley of the 7valleys). in that state he said "verily I am God; there is no God but me." The disciples, upon hearing it, got so disturbed and angry. When he came into the ordinary mind again, they asked him,
"Master, you were talking blasphemy. you were saying that you are God. why did you say such sinful things?"
Bayazid said, "Oh! it was not ME who was saying those words. but all right. each one of you now, must pick up a stab or razor or anything. and if the next time I started to say such things again, you can kill me."
The next night, disciples gathered around Bayazid. He started to say prayers and again the same thing happened. this time, the followers picked up their stabs, razors, knives, etc and started to hit Bayazid with them. but with each strike, only their own selves would get injured! some tried to cut his neck with razor; they only cut their own necks. some stabbed him on the chest; they only stabbed their own selves. and finally, they fell on the floor, with their own blood covering the whole floor and their hands and faces. Many died and some were injured with deep injuries.
only one of the followers who really loved Bayazid did not injure him, and thus he stayed alive.
Now Rumi concludes, "when you try to injure the Man of God, it is only yourself who will be injured. You may even destroy his physical body, but you can never kill His light. Never weary yourselves in fighting with Complete Man of God, because you are unable to extinguish His bright spirit."

Ok, this is now what came to my mind as an equivalent to the story of martyrdom of Bab. I hope you enjoy, and sorry if it does not fit THAT well.

Last edited by maryamr; 06-08-2017 at 12:13 AM.
 
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