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Old 07-11-2017, 04:19 AM   #1
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Before Bahai.

In Judaism, "chosenness" is the belief that the Jews, via descent from the ancient Israelites, are the chosen people, i.e. chosen to be in a covenant with God. The idea of the Israelites being chosen by God is found most directly in the Book of Deuteronomy[1][citation needed] as the verb bahar (בָּחַ֣ר (Hebrew)), and is alluded to elsewhere in the Hebrew Bible using other terms such as "holy people".[2] Much is written about these topics in rabbinic literature. The three largest Jewish denominations— Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism and Reform Judaism—maintain the belief that the Jews have been chosen by God for a purpose. Sometimes this choice is seen as charging the Jewish people with a specific mission — to be a light unto the nations, and to exemplify the covenant with God as described in the Torah.

This view, however, did not preclude a belief that God has a relationship with other peoples — rather, Judaism held that God had entered into a covenant with all humankind, and that Jews and non-Jews alike have a relationship with God. Biblical references as well as rabbinic literature support this view: Moses refers to the "God of the spirits of all flesh" (Numbers 27:16), and the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) also identifies prophets outside the community of Israel. Based on these statements, some rabbis theorized that, in the words of Nethanel ibn Fayyumi, a Yemenite Jewish theologian of the 12th century, "God permitted to every people something he forbade to others...[and] God sends a prophet to every people according to their own language."(Levine, 1907/1966)

>>>>>>The Mishnah states that "Humanity was produced from one man, Adam, to show God's greatness. <<<<<<< ( Here is Biblic proof racism is false, since Biblically we are one!)

When a man mints a coin in a press, each coin is identical. But when the King of Kings, the Holy One, blessed be He, creates people in the form of Adam not one is similar to any other." (Mishnah Sanhedrin 4:5) The Mishnah continues, and states that anyone who kills or saves a single human, not Jewish, life, has done the same (save or kill) to an entire world. The Tosefta, a collection of important post-Talmudic discourses, also states: "Righteous people of all nations have a share in the world to come" (Sanhedrin 105a).

According to the Israel Democracy Institute, approximately two thirds of Israeli Jews believe that Jews are the "chosen people".[3]"
________________________________________________
"This view, however, did not preclude a belief that God has a relationship with other peoples — rather, Judaism held that God had entered into a covenant with all humankind, and that Jews and non-Jews alike have a relationship with God. Biblical references as well as rabbinic literature support this view: Moses refers to the "God of the spirits of all flesh" (Numbers 27:16), and the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) also identifies prophets outside the community of Israel. Based on these statements, some rabbis theorized that, in the words of Nethanel ibn Fayyumi, a Yemenite Jewish theologian of the 12th century, "God permitted to every people something he forbade to others...

[and] >>God sends a prophet to every people according to their own language."(Levine, 1907/1966)<<"

This is Bahá'í teachings, That there are many Prophets/Manifestations from God, adding that the Prophets/Manifestations will continue through the ages, adding to The Teachings/Laws, and, Abrogating some older Teachings. As Civilization advances. It was impossible to teach equality between men and woman two thousand years ago, today the Bahá'í Teaching required we accept and promote equality between men and woman, as well as between the peoples all every and all nations, that universal education is mandatory for all, that excess of wealth and excess of poverty must happen, among others things to attain world peace, the Bahá'í faith teaches world peace is possible and will come as soon as we mature as a civilization on a whole.

Last edited by MichaelAW; 07-11-2017 at 05:08 AM.
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 06:02 AM   #2
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Thanks for opening this very interesting topic.

In this dispensation, neither the Báb, nor Bahá'u'lláh, nor Abdul Bahá seem to have said that we have a mission as a community of believers.... or that we, as a collective, have been chosen to do something special for the rest of mankind.

(I searched the terms "mission" and "chosen" across the Baha'i Reference Library and I couldn't find a single statement that connects these concepts with any given collective or community. In all cases they are connected with the mission of the Prophets, or Chosen Ones, as individuals).

It is completely understandable that in the ancient world, where ethnic and tribal identity was crucial for the survival of the individual, Jews interpreted God's revelation with a strong sense of ethnic/tribal "mission" or "chosenness".

In this age, though, there is no "chosen" collective anymore.
Each individual (regardless religious or national allegiance) should have a sense of duty towards himself and of service to mankind.
Perhaps, the point in question in this dispensation is not about being chosen, but about choosing.
"If thou art seeking everlasting glory, choose humility in the path of the True One" (Tablets of Abdul Bahá Abhas)

"O son of man! If thine eyes be turned towards mercy, forsake the things that profit thee and cleave unto that which will profit mankind. And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself." (Bahá'u'lláh, Words of Paradise)

"O SON OF BEING! Love Me, that I may love thee. If thou lovest Me not, My love can in no wise reach thee" (Bahá'u'lláh, Hidden Words)


Last edited by camachoe; 07-11-2017 at 06:56 AM.
 
Old 07-13-2017, 01:51 PM   #3
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Joined: Jul 2011
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Posts: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by camachoe View Post
Thanks for opening this very interesting topic.

In this dispensation, neither the Báb, nor Bahá'u'lláh, nor Abdul Bahá seem to have said that we have a mission as a community of believers.... or that we, as a collective, have been chosen to do something special for the rest of mankind.

(I searched the terms "mission" and "chosen" across the Baha'i Reference Library and I couldn't find a single statement that connects these concepts with any given collective or community. In all cases they are connected with the mission of the Prophets, or Chosen Ones, as individuals).

It is completely understandable that in the ancient world, where ethnic and tribal identity was crucial for the survival of the individual, Jews interpreted God's revelation with a strong sense of ethnic/tribal "mission" or "chosenness".

In this age, though, there is no "chosen" collective anymore.
Each individual (regardless religious or national allegiance) should have a sense of duty towards himself and of service to mankind.
Perhaps, the point in question in this dispensation is not about being chosen, but about choosing.
"If thou art seeking everlasting glory, choose humility in the path of the True One" (Tablets of Abdul Bahá Abhas)

"O son of man! If thine eyes be turned towards mercy, forsake the things that profit thee and cleave unto that which will profit mankind. And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself." (Bahá'u'lláh, Words of Paradise)

"O SON OF BEING! Love Me, that I may love thee. If thou lovest Me not, My love can in no wise reach thee" (Bahá'u'lláh, Hidden Words)

Perhaps Chosen and Covenant are close; What is the Covenant?

“A Covenant in the religious sense is a binding agreement between God and man, whereby God requires of man certain behaviour in return for which He guarantees certain blessings, or whereby He gives man certain bounties in return for which He takes from those who accept them an undertaking to behave in a certain way.”
The Universal House of Justice, 23 March 1975, The Covenant compilation
 
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