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Old 10-03-2017, 11:28 AM   #1
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Random question (s)

Just one of my random questions as I need an answer, this may sound stupid to some. I'm a new Baha'i so still getting an understanding of the faith, if say I want to visit a theme park for my enjoyment is that allowed and if so is it supported by bahahullah anywhere?
 
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:49 AM   #2
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Yes.

No, it's not mentioned in any Scriptures, because that thing didn't really exist at the time of such a revelation.

Baha'i Law is mostly "negative", rather than "positive". By this I mean it tells you what you cannot do, it doesn't tell you what you can do.

(There are a few instances where this is not the case, however, like Baha'u'llah explicitly wrote that music was allowed because so many Muslims mistakenly believe Islam forbids music. But as a general rule the Scriptures are an outline of what is forbidden, not what is permitted)

Therefore, if a thing is not mentioned in Scripture, one should assume as a rule that that thing is allowed.

Last edited by Walrus; 10-03-2017 at 11:53 AM.
 
Old 10-03-2017, 02:48 PM   #3
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Thanks

Thanks for the reply. Your answers are very helpful. May god bless you and keep you on this forum!
 
Old 10-03-2017, 03:09 PM   #4
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What about bodybuilding

The scriptures don't say masturbation is not allowed what's your thoughts on that then?

Last edited by Yousefy2; 10-03-2017 at 03:23 PM.
 
Old 10-03-2017, 11:51 PM   #5
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Shoghi Effendi interpreted the ban on sexual acts outside of marriage to include masturbation. In most cases you would watch porn or some picture while masturbating. So it is mostly the same as you would have sex with the ones depicted.

But, of course, it is an other category than cheating or casual sex.

As you mentioned bodybuilding: There is nothing in the scriptures specifically about bodybuilding, but one should keep in mind that the Faith encourages modesty in all aspects of life. It is surely up to you to define what "modest" means in this case.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 02:45 AM   #6
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I don't think Shoghi Effendi did make that interpretation. Not everything Shoghi Effendi himself wrote is an authoritative interpretation of scripture, which cannot be changed. He also made administrative decisions which can and have been changed (eg our unit convention system is different to his system), and he gave advice to individuals for their own use. The same is true of the letters written on his behalf: I do not know of any that contain a new interpretation of scripture although some refer to an earlier interpretation; there are heaps of administrative decisions, and oceans of personal advice.

So to show that Shoghi Effendi made an interpretation on any point, it is necessary to quote the words and look at the context.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 03:06 AM   #7
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Okay, I think I have the relevant letter here. I was in fact wrong. There is nothing explicit in the writings of the Guardian or in Bahá'í Scripture about masturbation. The Universal House of Justice deduces this ban from other passages.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the Universal House of Justice
We have found in the Holy Writings no explicit references to masturbation, but there are a number of principles and teachings which can guide a Bahá'í to the correct attitude towards it. In a letter to an individual believer, written by the Guardian's secretary on his behalf, it is pointed out that:

"The Bahá'í Faith recognizes the value of the sex impulse, but condemns its illegitimate and improper expressions such as free love, companionate marriage and others, all of which it considers positively harmful to man and to the society in which he lives. The proper use of the sex instinct is the natural right of every individual, and it is precisely for this very purpose that the institution of marriage has been established. The Bahá'ís do not believe in the suppression of the sex impulse but in its regulation and control."

In response to another letter enquiring if there were any legitimate way in which a person could express the sex instinct if, for some reason, he were unable to marry or if outer circumstances such as economic factors were to cause him to delay marriage, the Guardian's secretary wrote on his behalf:

"Concerning your question whether there are any legitimate forms of expression of the sex instinct outside of marriage: According to the Bahá'í Teachings no sexual act can be considered lawful unless performed between lawfully married persons. Outside of marital life there can be no lawful or healthy use of the sex impulse. The Bahá'í youth should, on the one hand, be taught the lesson of self-control which, when exercised, undoubtedly has a salutary effect on the development of character and of personality in general, and on the other should be advised, nay even encouraged, to contract marriage while still young and in full possession of their physical vigour. Economic factors, no doubt, are often a serious hindrance to early marriage but in most cases are only an excuse, and as such should not be over stressed."

In another letter on the Guardian's behalf, also to an individual believer, the secretary writes:

"Amongst the many other evils afflicting society in this spiritual low water mark in history is the question of immorality, and over-emphasis of sex..."

This indicates how the whole matter of sex and the problems related to it have assumed far too great an importance in the thinking of present-day society.

Masturbation is clearly not a proper use of the sex instinct, as this is understood in the Faith. Moreover it involves, as you have pointed out, mental fantasies, while Bahá'u'lláh, in the Kitáb-i-Aqdas, has exhorted us not to indulge our passions and in one of His well-known Tablets 'Abdu'l-Bahá encourages us to keep our "secret thoughts pure". Of course many wayward thoughts come involuntarily to the mind and these are merely a result of weakness and are not blameworthy unless they become fixed or even worse, are expressed in improper acts. In 'The Advent of Divine Justice', when describing the moral standards that Bahá'ís must uphold both individually and in their community life, the Guardian wrote:

"Such a chaste and holy life, with its implications of modesty, purity, temperance, decency, and clean-mindedness, involves no less than the exercise of moderation in all that pertains to dress, language, amusements, and all artistic and literary avocations. It demands daily vigilance in the control of one's carnal desires and corrupt inclinations."

Your problem, therefore, is one against which you should continue to struggle, with determination and with the aid of prayer. You should remember, however, that it is only one of the many temptations and faults that a human being must strive to overcome during his lifetime, and you should not increase the difficulty you have by over-emphasising its importance. We suggest you try to see it within the whole spectrum of the qualities that a Bahá'í must develop in his character. Be vigilant against temptation, but do not allow it to claim too great a share of your attention. You should concentrate, rather, on the virtues that you should develop, the services you should strive to render, and, above all, on God and His attributes, and devote your energies to living a full Bahá'í life in all its many aspects. (March 8, 1981)
 
Old 10-04-2017, 03:48 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Yousefy2 View Post
The scriptures don't say masturbation is not allowed what's your thoughts on that then?
I can't help feeling that it's an absolutely uninteresting matter, compared to the huge tasks we have as Bahá'ís.

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Old 10-04-2017, 04:28 AM   #9
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I can't help feeling that it's an absolutely uninteresting matter, compared to the huge tasks we have as Bahá'ís.

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gnat
I completely agree with you gnat. Christianity gets so obsessed about what happens in the bedroom that they lose sight of their core message. Church even becomes associated with extreme prudishness and sexual guilt. It also actually fuels the very toxic cultural notion that our lives revolve around our sexual expression. There is more to life than sex!! Turn on a Hollywood movie or a televangelist and that can be hard to tell though. That's a big problem.

I'm not Baha'i, but my unsolicited advice is don't be like the Christians. There are legitimate sexual issues that need people of faith and good will like sex trafficking, domestic abuse, rape, poor maternal care and support, gender equality and so on. But masterbation and porn (where actors are fairly compensated) are not one of them. Doesn't mean it's moral and doesn't mean individuals can't be lead to make choices regarding their lives and their families in favor of virtue. But let's pick our battles as people of faith.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 05:17 AM   #10
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Vain imaginings?

Is masturbation forbidden by bahahullah saying avoid vain imaginations? ? Why does the uhj not refer to the word vain imaginations when talking about masturbation
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:00 AM   #11
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The scriptures don't say masturbation is not allowed what's your thoughts on that then?
Basically:

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Originally Posted by Walrus View Post
Therefore, if a thing is not mentioned in Scripture, one should assume as a rule that that thing is allowed.
That one statement is pretty much a good axiom to figure out my given position on the permissibility of any given thing.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:04 AM   #12
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Is masturbation forbidden by bahahullah saying avoid vain imaginations? ? Why does the uhj not refer to the word vain imaginations when talking about masturbation
I would say "vain imaginings" refers to beliefs that come out of vain desires and the like. Perhaps like things one believes because one wants to believe them.

But then my thoughts above are wholly based on the English words "vain" and "imaginings", and so it may not be the best interpretation. Would anyone know the common phrase Baha'u'llah uses in its original Arabic or Farsi that is often translated as "vain imaginings" throughout the Scripture, who could provide some insight on the etymology here??

Looking at the page here: http://www.bahaiquotes.com/quotepage...ain+Imaginings it seems in context of most usages, this phrase refers to false beliefs.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:16 AM   #13
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Walrus does bahahullah not say in the scripture that if your unsure then see what uhj say and if uhj rule masturbation as not allowed does that not automatically make it in the scriptures as masturbation is forbidden?
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:25 AM   #14
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I can't help feeling that it's an absolutely uninteresting matter, compared to the huge tasks we have as Bahá'ís.

Best,

from

gnat
To yours and Mystics response, what is most important for us as bahais to do in your opinion, I thought it was to follow the laws so that's why I'm concerned about what I can and can't do
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:28 AM   #15
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Walrus does bahahullah not say in the scripture that if your unsure then see what uhj say and if uhj rule masturbation as not allowed does that not automatically make it in the scriptures as masturbation is forbidden?
The UHJ has the power to legislate on things if they want to.

This letter is advice given based on advice given by Shoghi Effendi, and is not legislation. They tend to be respectably cautious in introducing new laws into the Faith.

To my knowledge, they have not formalized a new law on the matter, which would have to go through a different procedure then simply sending a letter of advisement.

Just a thing to keep in mind, but not every statement the UHJ makes is a statement of law. It's like how an MP or a group of MPs could express their opinion or give advice on things, but that is different than Parliament passing a law.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:32 AM   #16
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Walrus regarding your saying of if its not mentioned in the scripture it's allowed so let's say masturbation. Bahahullah mentions importance of chastity and then we have this quote And "if he met the fairest and most comely of women, he would not feel his heart seduced by the least shadow of desire for her beauty. Such an one, indeed, is the creation of spotless chastity" now when you masturbate it's a desire for a women's beauty now hasn't that forbidden masturbation without directly addressing it? your thoughts?
 
Old 10-04-2017, 06:40 AM   #17
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The House of Justice tends to understand the law of chastity being about restricting the sex impulse to anything done inside marriage and excluding any possible form of sexual activity outside of marriage.

But, as others have already indicated, the House of Justice is not allowed to interpret the Writings but to legislate on matters not covered within them. They say that masturbation is not explicity dealt with in the Writings. So they could have legislated on it. They didn't.

You may come to your own conclusions on this matter but no personal interpretation of the Writings can ever form the basis for a law. Only the House of Justice is able to define what in fact is law and what is not.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 07:18 AM   #18
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To yours and Mystics response, what is most important for us as bahais to do in your opinion, I thought it was to follow the laws so that's why I'm concerned about what I can and can't do
I'm not Baha'i. So if you want to know what do to as a Baha'i, the others have already told you. Consult the Writings and the United Hall of Justice. Seek out your local spiritual assembly for further guidance. Just as if you were catholic you seek you a priest or if Jewish a Rabbi along with other faithful for support.

But then you should also consult God in prayer. We are called to a life of virtue. Our souls can only serve their purpose (to draw us closer to God) when they are just and virtuous. Does virtue mean for you a high standard of sexual purity that you feel God is calling you to? You are asking us what the ethical minimum is. You should be seeking the ethical level you feel being led to. This could be in these areas or it could be that you are feeling lead to worry less about your internet history and more about treating others with compassion in your work or school or in your own family. Family is often the hardest place to practice kindness!! Pray about it.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 10:22 AM   #19
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Walrus regarding your saying of if its not mentioned in the scripture it's allowed so let's say masturbation. Bahahullah mentions importance of chastity and then we have this quote And "if he met the fairest and most comely of women, he would not feel his heart seduced by the least shadow of desire for her beauty. Such an one, indeed, is the creation of spotless chastity" now when you masturbate it's a desire for a women's beauty now hasn't that forbidden masturbation without directly addressing it? your thoughts?
Your specific quote refers to an individual who has obtained a state of pure detachment, and is not necessarily a law on how to act. It also mentions the same person in that quote: "if he come to a valley of pure gold, will pass straight through it aloof as a cloud, and will neither turn back, nor pause."

So this is describing a person who has become liberated from all desire. Indeed an admirable state to strive for, but not necessarily a statement about how all people must act at all times. I'd think you should not take that verse as prescriptive, as I don't think that state of detachment can be achieved all at once, and attempting to close yourself off completely from all desires all at once will be harder and, probably, less productive than approaching detachment in degrees.

Now as to my personal views on the importance of chastity, this would be my interpretation (but bear in mind that my own interpretation is not authoritative in the slightest, and not inherently better or worse than any other random person's ) :

The most important reason for chastity and limiting of sexual partners within the bounds of a marriage is the fact that STD's can rapidly spread when such precautions are not taken. While this may not be the only reason for this commandment, I believe its chief importance is in the fact it is a hygiene law, and the health of ourselves and the whole of humanity is helped in following it. Since this risk comes from sexual contact with other people, then the thing you are asking about does not suffer from the biggest problem with infidelity.

My final point would be that original word that Baha'u'llah uses for the act of sex outside of marriage used is "zenaa’". I can't find much, but from what I can find it seems like the Arabic term refers specifically to sex with another person you are not married too, but take that with a grain of salt because I don't know much Arabic and the sources I could find on this specific word weren't great. Maybe someone with better knowledge of Arabic can speak more on the specific word choice used in the Scriptures.

The Quran, at the very least, specifically points out that such acts require two people, and the words "two people" are specifically used in the Quran when speaking of sexual acts outside of marriage.

Last edited by Walrus; 10-04-2017 at 10:27 AM.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 11:39 AM   #20
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Your specific quote refers to an individual who has obtained a state of pure detachment, and is not necessarily a law on how to act. It also mentions the same person in that quote: "if he come to a valley of pure gold, will pass straight through it aloof as a cloud, and will neither turn back, nor pause."

So this is describing a person who has become liberated from all desire. Indeed an admirable state to strive for, but not necessarily a statement about how all people must act at all times. I'd think you should not take that verse as prescriptive, as I don't think that state of detachment can be achieved all at once, and attempting to close yourself off completely from all desires all at once will be harder and, probably, less productive than approaching detachment in degrees.

Now as to my personal views on the importance of chastity, this would be my interpretation (but bear in mind that my own interpretation is not authoritative in the slightest, and not inherently better or worse than any other random person's ) :

The most important reason for chastity and limiting of sexual partners within the bounds of a marriage is the fact that STD's can rapidly spread when such precautions are not taken. While this may not be the only reason for this commandment, I believe its chief importance is in the fact it is a hygiene law, and the health of ourselves and the whole of humanity is helped in following it. Since this risk comes from sexual contact with other people, then the thing you are asking about does not suffer from the biggest problem with infidelity.

My final point would be that original word that Baha'u'llah uses for the act of sex outside of marriage used is "zenaa’". I can't find much, but from what I can find it seems like the Arabic term refers specifically to sex with another person you are not married too, but take that with a grain of salt because I don't know much Arabic and the sources I could find on this specific word weren't great. Maybe someone with better knowledge of Arabic can speak more on the specific word choice used in the Scriptures.

The Quran, at the very least, specifically points out that such acts require two people, and the words "two people" are specifically used in the Quran when speaking of sexual acts outside of marriage.
Nice so detachment is just a state being referred to and not necessarily required at all times? Can I ask you your view on suffering can it sometimes be a punishment as I know some can be trial/test
 
Old 10-04-2017, 12:27 PM   #21
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Walrus ... Looking at that quote again it actually begins with bahahullah saying he is not of the people of baha ... So ones heart being seduced by beauty is not of the people of baha. And also he is my true follower .. Therefore one who is not seduced by beauty. "He is not to be numbered with the people of Bahá who followeth his mundane desires, or fixeth his heart on things of the earth. He is not My true follower who, if he come to a valley of pure gold, will pass straight through it aloof as a cloud, and will neither turn back, nor pause. Such a man is, assuredly, of Me. From his garment the Concourse on high can inhale the fragrance of sanctity…. And if he met the fairest and most comely of women, he would not feel his heart seduced by the least shadow of desire for her beauty."

Last edited by Yousefy2; 10-04-2017 at 12:30 PM.
 
Old 10-04-2017, 02:45 PM   #22
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Also what's the meaning behind 'let your eye be chaste' anyone know the Arabic word used?
 
Old 10-04-2017, 03:58 PM   #23
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Walrus ... Looking at that quote again it actually begins with bahahullah saying he is not of the people of baha ... So ones heart being seduced by beauty is not of the people of baha. And also he is my true follower .. Therefore one who is not seduced by beauty. "He is not to be numbered with the people of Bahá who followeth his mundane desires, or fixeth his heart on things of the earth. He is not My true follower who, if he come to a valley of pure gold, will pass straight through it aloof as a cloud, and will neither turn back, nor pause. Such a man is, assuredly, of Me. From his garment the Concourse on high can inhale the fragrance of sanctity…. And if he met the fairest and most comely of women, he would not feel his heart seduced by the least shadow of desire for her beauty."
After many years as a Bahá'í, I have come to terms with such statements. I have accepted the tact that I am not one of the Chosen Ones. I just go about my business, trying my best, calmly accepting that there is no special place for me in Heaven.

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Old 10-05-2017, 02:28 AM   #24
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Also what's the meaning behind 'let your eye be chaste' anyone know the Arabic word used?
kunu fi at-Taraf `afifan

`FF has the root meaning of abstemious (careful about indulging) and chaste
 
Old 10-05-2017, 03:04 AM   #25
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After many years as a Bahá'í, I have come to terms with such statements. I have accepted the tact that I am not one of the Chosen Ones. I just go about my business, trying my best, calmly accepting that there is no special place for me in Heaven.

Best,

from

gnat
What's this about? Is it a reference to higher states of heaven like in Islam? I'm still learning about Baha'i.
If so, then let me give an example to turn it's on its head. Suppose you had two men great saint and a proud hypocrite who died and went to heaven. But there was a mistake and then ended up having their position in heaven switched. The proud hypocrite (who wasnt awful and did occasionally pray but was very worldly and had a high opinion of himself) ascended to the front of the crowd close to God as any other mortal. He might say that indeed he had deserved this for his many showy deeds and large donations.
But the saint, by mistake, ends up at the very edge of heaven barely making it in. How would they react? I suspect with weeping for joy at being given even a distant glimpse of God and having been deemed worthy for even this since the saint knows well their many sins and faults.
I'd much rather be the saint that rejoices at making it to heaven at all. It doesn't matter how close up I get.
 
Old 10-05-2017, 03:57 AM   #26
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kunu fi at-Taraf `afifan

`FF has the root meaning of abstemious (careful about indulging) and chaste
Nice thank you. Can I ask you if you know Arabic/Farsi? Or did you use a website. I am interested in how you got that kind of information and how I can do the same with various other passages without learning Arabic which I may actually have to
 
Old 10-05-2017, 08:55 AM   #27
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Nice so detachment is just a state being referred to and not necessarily required at all times?
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What's this about? Is it a reference to higher states of heaven like in Islam? I'm still learning about Baha'i.
The state of "Total Detachment" in the Baha'i view is similar to the state of "Enlightenment" in, say, the Buddhist tradition. It's a great state of mind and something everyone should strive for, but probably shouldn't be seen as a "requirement", especially not "required at all times", because it isn't exactly something easy to pull off, and it's not as if it is as simple as deciding to embrace full detachment all at once. Detachment is something that needs to be learned in stages.

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Can I ask you your view on suffering can it sometimes be a punishment as I know some can be trial/test
Sure. To start of any discussion on "suffering" I always try to define what I believe the word to mean, because when I do not do so, it always seems to cause confusion over what I am talking about.

"Suffering" is distinct and different from "pain". This is something I think should be obvious, since there are many times where someone could be "suffering" without being in pain at all, but I think people can often equate the two because pain can often cause suffering.

But as I've stated, people can suffer due to things like sorrow that have nothing to do with pain. And alternately, a person can get so used to feeling pain that they experience no suffering from it (for example I had chronic migraines as a child, and now minor headaches don't even really bother me, which is a reason I think pain is not always suffering).

Suffering, I believe, results from attachment, the opposite of detachment. In short: we grow attached to the idea of how we think the world should be and experience suffering when it is not that way. Attachment to wealth and then not having the wealth one desires causes suffering. Attachment to a political leader can cause suffering when that leader ceases to hold power. Attachment to the state of not experiencing pain then causes suffering when one receives pain.

This is at least one reason why I think human beings are taught detachment by our various prophets: it is the key to overcoming suffering.

I would not call it a punishment, though, rather it is a consequence of attachment. It's not as if you grow attached to something and then God seeks to punish you with suffering for this action, but rather it is your attachment that causes the suffering in and of itself.

This viewpoint of mine is drawn from various Baha'i, Taoist, and Buddhist ideas.

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If so, then let me give an example to turn it's on its head. Suppose you had two men great saint and a proud hypocrite who died and went to heaven. But there was a mistake and then ended up having their position in heaven switched. The proud hypocrite (who wasnt awful and did occasionally pray but was very worldly and had a high opinion of himself) ascended to the front of the crowd close to God as any other mortal. He might say that indeed he had deserved this for his many showy deeds and large donations.
But the saint, by mistake, ends up at the very edge of heaven barely making it in. How would they react? I suspect with weeping for joy at being given even a distant glimpse of God and having been deemed worthy for even this since the saint knows well their many sins and faults.
I'd much rather be the saint that rejoices at making it to heaven at all. It doesn't matter how close up I get.
I agree, actually.

I had made a similar analogy recently with the local Mormon missionaries in explaining how Baha'is view the concept of "Hell". (As a consequence of loving religion in general: I always talk with the missionaries when they come around).

Basically I explained that in the Baha'i view nothing is worse than being separated from God. I posited a "what if" scenario: What if there were two distinct afterlives. In one you had a connection to God, but you experienced being burned alive for all eternity. In the other, you experienced eternal pleasure, but had no connection to God.

Which afterlife is preferable??

I stated my belief was the eternal-burning afterlife with God present would appeal more to me than the eternal-pleasure afterlife devoid of divinity. Thus, the question of whether Hell is literal or a metaphor for separation of God is somewhat irrelevant in my eyes: because the worst thing about Hell would not be the burning, but the separation.

Last edited by Walrus; 10-05-2017 at 08:58 AM.
 
Old 10-05-2017, 11:23 AM   #28
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What's this about? Is it a reference to higher states of heaven like in Islam? I'm still learning about Baha'i.
If so, then let me give an example to turn it's on its head. Suppose you had two men great saint and a proud hypocrite who died and went to heaven. But there was a mistake and then ended up having their position in heaven switched. The proud hypocrite (who wasnt awful and did occasionally pray but was very worldly and had a high opinion of himself) ascended to the front of the crowd close to God as any other mortal. He might say that indeed he had deserved this for his many showy deeds and large donations.
But the saint, by mistake, ends up at the very edge of heaven barely making it in. How would they react? I suspect with weeping for joy at being given even a distant glimpse of God and having been deemed worthy for even this since the saint knows well their many sins and faults.
I'd much rather be the saint that rejoices at making it to heaven at all. It doesn't matter how close up I get.
From what I see in the writings is that one lives their life faces their challenges and tries each time to be the best they can. In all this remain happy and content that it is God that is guiding us. Each day we bring ourselbes to account with God.

Then Apart from our choices we then face as the future unfolds, the rest is in Gods Hands and we live this life free of the want of reward or over dwelling on our mistakes, both of these self-motivated.

Regards Tony

Last edited by tonyfish58; 10-05-2017 at 11:27 AM.
 
Old 10-05-2017, 02:55 PM   #29
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Joined: Sep 2017
From: Birmingham
Posts: 66
Lechary

Two Baha'i websites are claiming different wording for the same passage.

Ye are forbidden to commit adultery, sodomy, and lechery (ziná', liwa, and khyanah)

Khyanah - faithlessness

Another website claims

Ye are forbidden to commit adultery (ZINA), sodomy (LIWAT) and lechery (SIHAQAQ).

Sihaqaq - grinding (female homosexual act)

So the word I'm looking to understand is Lechary .. As i was reading a forum about sex within a marriage and a man posted that it's allowed because of this passage

Enter ye into wedlock, that after you another may arise in your stead. We, verily, have forbidden you lechery, and not that which is conducive to fidelity.

(Baha'u'llah, cited in Epistle to

In the English language Lechary is sexual desire now if that's the Arabic word meaning that would make sense that sex within a marriage apart from procreation is acceptable as its stated its ok if it's for fidelity. If it's shiqaq it does not make sense, if it's kayanah it does not mean sex in marriage is accepted. I'm guessing different words are being used in different Arabic passages but same words being used for English translation so jw what Lechary is in Arabic in the above passages? I'm confused on how one can correctly follow the teachings when UHJ try their best to not make things clear on top of translational problems as cited above

Last edited by Yousefy2; 10-05-2017 at 02:59 PM.
 
Old 10-05-2017, 03:47 PM   #30
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MysticMonist's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2017
From: USA
Posts: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyfish58 View Post
From what I see in the writings is that one lives their life faces their challenges and tries each time to be the best they can. In all this remain happy and content that it is God that is guiding us. Each day we bring ourselbes to account with God.

Then Apart from our choices we then face as the future unfolds, the rest is in Gods Hands and we live this life free of the want of reward or over dwelling on our mistakes, both of these self-motivated.

Regards Tony
Thanks tony and walrus for the clarification.
 
Old 10-10-2017, 02:46 PM   #31
djg
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Joined: Jul 2017
From: Denver, CO
Posts: 41
To my knowledge, this is the only place a Manifestation of God has addressed masturbation:
"God forgiveth you your nocturnal emissions and masturbation. But know ye the value of your seed, for your seed is the cause of the creation of one who worshippeth God. Keep your seed in the exquisite place. The purpose of this command is that perhaps the fruit of your existence will come to the aid of the religion of God. When semen cometh out by your own free will, make the ablutions, prostrate yourself and say this verse nineteen
times: 'Thou art the Most Pure and Sublime, O my God! Thou art free from error and lack. There is none other God save Thee! I proclaim Thy sublimity, and I am of those who know that Thou art the Pure.' "
(Báb, Arabic Bayan, Vahid 8, Bab 10; provisional translation)
As for pornography:
"Let your eye be chaste, your hand faithful, your tongue truthful and your heart enlightened."
(Bahá’u’lláh, Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 138)
Can one view such images, videos, and literature with a chaste eye? Would the chaste eye seek such things out?

And from the UHJ quote mentioned earlier in the thread, one may gather that it is best not to let the issue of self-pleasure occupy very much mind-space. If we seek to fill our lives with service to the Cause, the issue will likely take care of itself.

I am myself curious about one thing. It has been stated in the Baha'i tradition that the purpose of marriage is procreation. What then is the godly course of action in the situation where a person gets divorced in their 40's, or their spouse passes away? Once a woman is beyond the procreative age, is marriage then purposeless for her, and even forbidden? ("Companionate marriage" is viewed as a harmful thing.)

Christ said that he who divorces a woman causes her to commit adultery. Monasticism is condemned.

But on the other hand, marriage is not taken to be obligatory.

It seems a natural human desire to have a partner in marriage, even beyond the procreative years. But perhaps this is a sweeping assumption on my part. Have we been offered any guidance on this by Abdu'l-Baha, Shoghi Effendi, or the Universal House of Justice?
 
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