Bahai Forums

Go Back   Baha'i Forums > Baha'i Forums > General Discussion

General Discussion Open Baha'i Discussion


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-27-2013, 09:51 AM   #41
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by querysolution View Post
thanks for sharing such thoughts, i love such didactic stories. One i like most is, a person used public carrier except of private and help the fisherwomen.


If all we thought like that then there will be satisfaction and a bful world would emerge
Welcome friend, I am happy that you are enjoying these stories from the history of Abdul-Baha, the Servant of Baha'u'llah.
 
Join Baha'i Forums


Welcome to Baha'i Forums, an open Baha'i Faith community! We welcome everyone and the community is free to join so register today and become part of the Baha'i Forums family!


Old 05-27-2013, 11:07 AM   #42
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Loise Waite wrote: ‘Once having accepted Abdul-Bahá’s station, it is as useless to vex our minds with all these “why’s and wherefores” as it would be for a way-worn traveler when a wagon comes along and the driver offers to carry him to town and he gladly climbs in, to continue to carry his heavy burden on his back. At Akká, I not only climbed into the wagon of Truth, but I also left my heavy bundle of self, opinions and perplexity of ideas by the roadside, knowing that the Divine Driver would carry me safely to town. God has indeed given us an “Ark of Safety” in Abdul-Bahá.
Abdul-Bahá, the Mystery of God!
‘Who can comprehend that Mystery? Surely not finite mind nor intellect. Only through the heart can we catch a faint glimpse of His Station.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 164)
 
Old 05-27-2013, 11:22 AM   #43
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Bahá’s photograph, alone, had a powerful influence on a little girl. There was that ‘extraordinary experience of a woman whose little girl, as a result of a dream she had, insisted that Jesus Christ was in the world, and who, at the sight of Abdul.Bahá’s picture exposed in the window of a magazine store, had instantly identified it as that of the Jesus Christ of her dream – an act which impelled her mother, after reading that Abdul-Bahá was in Paris, to take the next boat for Europe and hasten to attain His presence…..’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 162-163)
 
Old 05-27-2013, 11:29 AM   #44
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2013
From: forest falls california
Posts: 1,750
The First Valley

"O thou soul who is pleasing unto God. Refer to the verse:
O thous soul who are reassured,
Return to thy Lord, well-pleased, and pleasing unto Him.
Enter thou among My servants,
And enter thou My paradise.
...
The death of self is needed here, not rhetoric:
Be nothing, then, and walk upon the waves.
And be not like those who forget God, and whom He hath therefore caused to forget their own selves. These are the wicked doers."

"How can feeble reason encompass the Quran,
Or the spider snare a phoenix in his web?
Wouldst thou that the mind should not entrap thee?
Teach it the science of the love of God!
...
In this realm, to search after knowledge is irrelevant, for He hath said concerning the travelers on this plane:
"Fear God, and God will instruct thee."
and again:
"Knowledge is a light which God casteth into the heart of whomsoever He willeth."
 
Old 05-27-2013, 11:43 AM   #45
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
The Master's positive approach to life and to people encouraged His friends , good as they may have been, to become even better. They were to 'see no evil' in others, nor were they to see it in themselves, except in so far that it encouraged them to grow spiritually. The Master said, 'Do not look at thy weakness; nay look at the power of thy Lord, which hath surrounded all regions.' This advice is found repeatedly: 'Do not look at your weakness, nay rely upon confirmation of the Holy Spirit. Verily, it maketh the weak strong, the lowly mighty, the child grown, the infant mature and the small great.'
And again - 'Trust in the favour of God. Look not at your own capacities, for the divine bestowal can transform a drop into an ocean; it can make a tiny seed a lofty tree.'

Super-psychiatrist that He was, He taught that, 'We should not be occupied with our failings and weakness, but concern ourselves about the Will of God so that It may flow through us, thereby healing these human infirmities.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 105-106)
 
Old 05-29-2013, 11:05 AM   #46
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by dale ramsdell View Post
"O thou soul who is pleasing unto God. Refer to the verse:
O thous soul who are reassured,
Return to thy Lord, well-pleased, and pleasing unto Him.
Enter thou among My servants,
And enter thou My paradise.
...
The death of self is needed here, not rhetoric:
Be nothing, then, and walk upon the waves.
And be not like those who forget God, and whom He hath therefore caused to forget their own selves. These are the wicked doers."

"How can feeble reason encompass the Quran,
Or the spider snare a phoenix in his web?
Wouldst thou that the mind should not entrap thee?
Teach it the science of the love of God!
...
In this realm, to search after knowledge is irrelevant, for He hath said concerning the travelers on this plane:
"Fear God, and God will instruct thee."
and again:
"Knowledge is a light which God casteth into the heart of whomsoever He willeth."
These quotes (The death of self is needed here, not rhetoric reminded me of this:-.............

"In one of His Tablets 'Abdu'l-Bahá states that the word 'courageous' can apply to a person who conquers his own self and passion. For it is easier to conquer whole countries than to defeat one's own self. The purpose of the coming of the Manifestations of God is to endow the soul of man with spiritual qualities and enable him to defeat his greatest enemy -- his own self.

(Ma'idiy-i-Asamani, vol. 5, p. 156., cited in Adib Taherzadeh, The Revelation of Baha'u'llah - vol. 3 - 'Akka, The Early Years - 1868-77, p. 35)[/QUOTE]

How true our greatest enemy is our own self (ego)
 
Old 05-29-2013, 11:11 AM   #47
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Baha's humility did not stem from any weakness. Once when a child asked Him why all the rivers of the earth flow into the ocean, He said, 'because it sets itself lower than them all and so draws them to itself.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 19)
 
Old 05-29-2013, 11:25 AM   #48
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
In Philadelphia, Abdul-Baha spoke to the friends about the Nineteen-Day Feast, which lies at the foundation of Baha'i spiritual and community life and which is held at the start of each Baha'i month. He stressed the importance of this occasion: 'Each one of you must think how to make happy and pleased the other members of your Assembly, and each one must consider all those who are present as better and greater than himself, and each one must consider himself less than the rest. Know their station as high and think of your own station as low. Should you act and live according to these behests, know verily, of a certainty, that that Feast is the Heavenly Food. That Supper is the "Lord's Supper"! I am the Servant of that gathering,'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 19)
 
Old 05-29-2013, 09:23 PM   #49
Senior Member
 
ahanu's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
From: 北京/美国
Posts: 1,023
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
Abdul-Baha's humility did not stem from any weakness. Once when a child asked Him why all the rivers of the earth flow into the ocean, He said, 'because it sets itself lower than them all and so draws them to itself.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 19)
Hmm . . . and in doing so all become dependent on the ocean.
 
Old 05-30-2013, 07:01 AM   #50
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Wonderful isn't it.

One has only to look at all the people who thought highly of Abdul-Baha, even his enemies, spoke highly of him. He truly was the perfect exemplar!
 
Old 05-30-2013, 09:38 PM   #51
Tony Bristow-Stagg
 
tonyfish58's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
From: Normanton Far North Queensland
Posts: 3,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
Wonderful isn't it.

One has only to look at all the people who thought highly of Abdul-Baha, even his enemies, spoke highly of him. He truly was the perfect exemplar!

Yes with x 10 x 100 x 1000 x 10,000

Regards Tony
 
Old 06-01-2013, 05:23 PM   #52
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
The Master made it quite clear that people of very different capacities were qualified to teach this great Faith, each in his own way. John David Bosch, who had come to America from Switzerland, felt that he could not be a speaker - instead he circulated pamphlets and books. The Master encouraged him: 'You are doing very well; you are doing better than talking. With you it is not words or the movement of the lips; with you it is the heart that speaks. In your presence silence speaks and radiates.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 49)
 
Old 06-01-2013, 05:54 PM   #53
Member
 
Joined: Aug 2012
From: united states
Posts: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
The Master made it quite clear that people of very different capacities were qualified to teach this great Faith, each in his own way. John David Bosch, who had come to America from Switzerland, felt that he could not be a speaker - instead he circulated pamphlets and books. The Master encouraged him: 'You are doing very well; you are doing better than talking. With you it is not words or the movement of the lips; with you it is the heart that speaks. In your presence silence speaks and radiates.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 49)
Bill,

I have never heard this one before, but it is just beautiful.
 
Old 06-01-2013, 05:58 PM   #54
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by He is The One 19 View Post
Bill,

I have never heard this one before, but it is just beautiful.
dear friend you should buy the book, all the stories are beautiful :-)
 
Old 06-03-2013, 12:56 PM   #55
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
One day Abdul-Baha learned that a lady had cut her lovely hair in order to contribute to the building of the House of Worship in Wilmette. He wrote to her with loving appreciation: 'On one hand, I was deeply touched, for thou hadst sheared off those fair tresses of thine with the shears of detachment from this world and of self-sacrifice in the path of the Kingdom of God. And on the other, I was greatly pleased, for that dearly beloved daughter hath evinced so great a spirit of self-sacrifice as to offer up so precious a part of her body in the pathway of God. Hadst thou sought my opinion, I would in no wise have consented that thou shouldst shear off even a single thread of thy comely and wavy locks; nay, I myself would have contributed in thy name for the Mashriqu'l-Adhkár. This deed of thine is, however, an eloquent testimony to the noble spirit of self-sacrifice.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 98)
 
Old 06-04-2013, 08:52 PM   #56
Tony Bristow-Stagg
 
tonyfish58's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
From: Normanton Far North Queensland
Posts: 3,843
In His Footsteps

I have always enjoyed this story

Pilgrims’ notes tell us that one day Lua Getsinger was walking with ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and some of the friends on the white sands of the sea near ‘Akka. Lua, it is said, suddenly became aware of the Master’s tracks in the soft sand. She was walking a pace or two behind Him. Quite spontaneously she stepped behind ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and began to trace His footsteps by placing her shoes one at a time in each of His footprints. It is said that without turning, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá said sharply, ‘What are you doing?‘
Lua replied cheerily, ‘I am following in your footsteps.’ ‘Abdu’l-Bahá was silent for some time. Then He repeated more forcefully, ‘Lua, what are you doing?’ She said, ‘I am walking in your footsteps, beloved Master.’ Without a word, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá strode on. Lua, it is said, felt a chill as she realized the utter futility and presumptuousness of such a weak instrument as herself ever daring to aspire to walk in the footsteps of the ‘Mystery of God‘. Suddenly Lua felt an agonizing pain in her ankle. She looked down. She had been stung by a scorpion. She cried out, but the Master did not turn or slow His stride. Lua walked on with the utmost difficulty. Her ankle was swelling rapidly. The pain was becoming intense. But she clenched her teeth and forced herself to continue. When the suffering had become almost unbearable, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá turned and came back. ‘This‘, He told her, ‘is what it means to walk in My footsteps.’ ‘Abdu’l-Bahá touched her head gently with his hand. Lua’s eyes were brimming with tears. She understood the lesson. The Master turned and continued on His way, Lua limping after Him the best she could. She felt the pain gradually diminishing as she tried to keep up with her beloved Master.
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 124)

Regards Tony
 
Old 06-05-2013, 07:05 AM   #57
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Thank you Tony

Yes another beautiful story of the Master.
 
Old 06-06-2013, 07:59 AM   #58
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
The words of Abdul-Baha contained many surprises - both pleasant and not so pleasant. Among such written words were these: 'If once this life should offer a man a sweet cup, a hundred bitter ones will follow; such is the condition of this world.'
'Bring them (the children) up to work and strive, and accustom them to hardship.'
'The Bab hath said that the people of Bahá must develop the science of medicine to such a high degree that they will heal illnesses by means of foods.'
'When the friends do not endeavour to spread the message, they fail to remember God befittingly....'
The Master scattered abroad the seeds of truth - seeds that slowly germinate and gradually bear their profitable and happy harvest.

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 101)
 
Old 06-06-2013, 02:19 PM   #59
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
In the story which follows as an example, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in response to an emotional plea from an older believer Aqa Riday-i-Qannad, said,
"Yes, in the path of the Blessed Beauty one must drink heartily from the overflowing cup of difficulties and afflictions in order to experience its consummate intoxicating effect. One type of adversity only does not have the same effect; it does not bestow that inebriating pleasure. Wines of diverse flavours must be consumed in this divine banquet, until one is utterly intoxicated."
He uttered these words with such joy and ardour that every atom of our beings soared with a sense of ecstasy and rapture. Then He added, ‘But you have never attended a drinking party. To get completely drunk and ultimately lose all sense of himself, a drinker mixes his drinks. .. . We, too, must drink various tastes from the cup of tribulation." Suddenly, in a booming voice He asked, Jináb-i-Khán, is that not so?"
All eyes were focused on me. And I without a moment's hesitation replied,
"Yes, Beloved, that is so. By the way, they drink something else too."
"What is that, then?" asked 'Abdu'l-Bahá.
"They mix wine and whisky and say, we are drinking 'wineky'!"
Suddenly His laughter rang out, His tearful eyes looked heavenward, and with a smile He said, "We, too, as the Khán says, drink wineky, drink wineky!"
(Memories of Nine Years in Akká, by Dr. Youness Afroukhteh, p. 184)
 
Old 06-07-2013, 09:39 AM   #60
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2013
From: forest falls california
Posts: 1,750
Abdul Baha's Servitude

In His Teachings Bahá'u'lláh has made it clear that there are only three stations in this world of existence. First, the station of God which is beyond our comprehension, then the station of the Manifestation of God which is exalted above the world of humanity, and lastly, the station of man which is that of servitude. In the service of the Cause of God the greatest protection for the individual is meekness and humility. It is the most acceptable gift that man can offer to God. For, by virtue of His sovereignty and dominion, humility is not one of God's attributes.

'Abdu'l-Bahá, the true Exemplar of the Teachings of Bahá'u'lláh, has established the pattern of servitude for all to follow. He descended to the lowest plane of servitude which is the highest station for man to attain.

Bahá'u'lláh's position was that of sovereignty and lordship. The position of His Son, 'Abdu'l-Bahá, was that of servitude. When water flows from the summit of a mountain and falls to the valley, it creates energy. Similarly, the flow of spiritual forces from Bahá'u'lláh to 'Abdu'l-Bahá has produced a great power which is released to mankind. When Bahá'u'lláh appeared there was no one worthy or capable of receiving His Revelation. 'Abdu'l-Bahá on behalf of humanity became its perfect recipient and, although not a Manifestation of God, He was invested with divine authority and power by Bahá'u'lláh

(Adib Taherzadeh, The Revelation of Baha'u'llah - vol. 1 - Baghdad 1853-63, pp. 133-34)
 
Old 06-11-2013, 08:19 AM   #61
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by dale ramsdell View Post
In His Teachings Bahá'u'lláh has made it clear that there are only three stations in this world of existence. First, the station of God which is beyond our comprehension, then the station of the Manifestation of God which is exalted above the world of humanity, and lastly, the station of man which is that of servitude. In the service of the Cause of God the greatest protection for the individual is meekness and humility. It is the most acceptable gift that man can offer to God. For, by virtue of His sovereignty and dominion, humility is not one of God's attributes.

'Abdu'l-Bahá, the true Exemplar of the Teachings of Bahá'u'lláh, has established the pattern of servitude for all to follow. He descended to the lowest plane of servitude which is the highest station for man to attain.

Bahá'u'lláh's position was that of sovereignty and lordship. The position of His Son, 'Abdu'l-Bahá, was that of servitude. When water flows from the summit of a mountain and falls to the valley, it creates energy. Similarly, the flow of spiritual forces from Bahá'u'lláh to 'Abdu'l-Bahá has produced a great power which is released to mankind. When Bahá'u'lláh appeared there was no one worthy or capable of receiving His Revelation. 'Abdu'l-Bahá on behalf of humanity became its perfect recipient and, although not a Manifestation of God, He was invested with divine authority and power by Bahá'u'lláh

(Adib Taherzadeh, The Revelation of Baha'u'llah - vol. 1 - Baghdad 1853-63, pp. 133-34)
So true Dale
I have met some people who have difficulty with what they say is the flowery language of Baha'u'llah, his language so similar to the bible whereas Abdul-Baha describes things so simply: I have not met anyone who did not love the writings of Abdu-Baha.

I on the other hand have never had a problem with what is sometimes called bible talk/speech, there is nothing to compare with the writings of Baha'u'llah.
But Abdul-Baha is so easy to love. :-)
 
Old 06-11-2013, 11:53 PM   #62
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
No mere mortal in His day could claim to be His teacher. He learned well and thoroughly. When, late in His life, Baha'u'llah took up residence at Bahjí, the Master remained in Akká to attend to a multitude of details, which otherwise might have distracted Baha'u'llah from His writing. But frequently the Master carried news to Bahjí. He then reported on religious questions He had encountered. It was observed that Baha'u'llah asked for His answers and then approved them with 'very good'.
His wisdom was as astonishing as His knowledge. The Master's profound wisdom coupled with His all-encompassing, tender love were capable of producing a revolution in the inner life of those with whom He came in contact. This revolution was a 'change of heart'. Horace Holley became 'conscious of a new sympathy for individuals and a new series of ties by which all men are joined in one common destiny.' He discovered that Abdul-Baha restores man to his state a little lower than the angels.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 102)
 
Old 06-12-2013, 05:18 AM   #63
Senior Member
 
Joined: Mar 2010
From: Rockville, MD, USA
Posts: 1,354
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
I have met some people who have difficulty with what they say is the flowery language of Baha'u'llah, his language so similar to the [B]ible...
We should remember that the REASON Shoghi Effendi chose to use Elizabethan English when he translated the Writings of Baha'u'llah is that the original Persian and Arabic texts were themselves in a very lofty, elevated style of writing such that he felt that style of English best reflects their tone.

Regards, :-)

Bruce
 
Old 06-12-2013, 09:02 AM   #64
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2013
From: forest falls california
Posts: 1,750
Thou sayest truly

Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceDLimber View Post


We should remember that the REASON Shoghi Effendi chose to use Elizabethan English when he translated the Writings of Baha'u'llah is that the original Persian and Arabic texts were themselves in a very lofty, elevated style of writing such that he felt that style of English best reflects their tone.

Regards, :-)

Bruce
>>> Bruce, Thou doth sayest truly what hath to be spokeneth thusly... ;-)
 
Old 06-12-2013, 02:59 PM   #65
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceDLimber View Post


We should remember that the REASON Shoghi Effendi chose to use Elizabethan English when he translated the Writings of Baha'u'llah is that the original Persian and Arabic texts were themselves in a very lofty, elevated style of writing such that he felt that style of English best reflects their tone.

Regards, :-)

Bruce
Dear Bruce this I understand fully, was just a casual comment about some people I have met, these people also have difficulty with, say the KJ Bible.
Has never been a problem for me.
But thanks for explaining for the readers.
 
Old 06-14-2013, 04:47 PM   #66
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
In 1914 the Master wrote to the friends in Denver concerning how to convey the message of Baha'u'llah: 'The three conditions of teaching the Cause of God are the science of sociability, purity of deeds and sweetness of speech. I hope each one of you may become confirmed with these three attributes.'
Earlier in New York City, He had spoken to His friends about there going to Green Acre, the Baha'i summer school in Maine: 'You must give the message through action and deed, not only by word. Word must be conjoined with deed. You must love your friend better than yourself; yes be willing to sacrifice yourself.
The cause of Baha'u'llah has not yet appeared in this country. I desire that you be ready to sacrifice everything for each other, even life itself; then I will know that the cause of Baha'u'llah has been established. I will pray for you that you may become the cause of upraising the lights of God. May everyone point to you and ask "Why are these people so happy?" I want you to be happy in Green Acre, to laugh and rejoice in order that others may be made happy by you.'
On the same subject He wrote: 'Caution and prudence, however must be observed even as recorded in the Book. The veil must in no wise be suddenly rent asunder.'
The teacher should also be concerned about the listener's physical needs. This practical approach was apparent in Abdul-Baha's words: 'Never talk about God to a man with an empty stomach . Feed him first.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 104-105)
 
Old 06-15-2013, 10:52 AM   #67
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
At one time the Master was asked, 'What shall I say to those who state that they are satisfied with Christianity and do not need this present Manifestation?' His reply was clear; 'Let them alone. What would they do if a former king had reigned and a new king was now seated upon the throne? They must acknowledge the new king, or they are not true subjects of the Kingdom. Last year there was a springtime. Can man say "I do not need a new springtime this year - the old springtime is enough for me"? No! The new springtime must come to fill the earth with beauty and brightness.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 105)
 
Old 06-22-2013, 05:51 PM   #68
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Corinne True made one of her nine pilgrimages to the Baha'i Holy Places in Palestine 'during the time of the Second Commission of Investigation by the Turks, when Abdel-Baha had again been confined as a prisoner to Akká by order of the Sultán of Turkey. On this visit Mrs True took a petition to the Master asking permission for the American Baha'is to begin planning for the erection of a "House of Worship". This petition was in the form of a parchment containing the signatures of over a thousand American believers. She tells the story of putting the parchment behind her on the divan and first presenting the little gifts sent by the loving friends. But the Master strode across the room, reaching behind her and grasping the parchment, holding it high in the air. "This," He exclaimed, "this is what gives me great joy."
"Go back," He told her, "go back and work for the Temple; it is great work. "How she longed to do this work, but it seemed such a great task. Abdul-Baha, looking at her with deep intensity said, "Devote yourself to this project - make a beginning, and all will come right." Then proceeded to give basic instructions about its design. It was to have nine sides, none gardens, nine fountains, nine doors, nine walks, etc. And so a vision of the first Baha'i Temple in the Western Hemisphere was born.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 106- 107)
 
Old 06-28-2013, 08:13 AM   #69
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
For many years during the Master's late life there occurred a constant 'flow of pilgrims' who 'transmitted the verbal messages and special instructions of a vigilant Master'. World War 1 brought a rude halt to these heavenly journeys.
'A remarkable instance of the foresight of Abdul-Bahá was supplied during the months immediately preceding the war. During peace times there was usually a large number of pilgrims at Haifa, from Persia and other regions of the globe. About six months before the outbreak of the war one of the old Baha'is living at Haifa presented a request from several believers of Persia for permission to visit the Master. Abdul-Bahá did not grant the permission, and from that time onwards gradually dismissed the pilgrims who were at Haifa, so that by the end of July, 1914, none remained. When , in the first days of August, the sudden outbreak of the Great War startled the world, the wisdom of His precaution became apparent.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 107-108)
 
Old 06-29-2013, 11:23 AM   #70
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Baha learned well the meaning of Baha’u’llah’s words. ‘Beware lest thou allow anything whatsoever to grieve thee.’ Acquainted with sorrow, He was known to shed tears when He spoke of the hardships endured by Baha’u’llah, His family and His followers who went into exile with Him. Sometimes He appeared sad because not more people were responding to His call to Baha’u’llah, but he truly lived what He spoke when He said, referring to the spiritual Kingdom, ‘A man living with his thoughts in this Kingdom knows perpetual joy. The ills all flesh is heir to do not pass him by, but they only touch the surface of his life, the depths are calm and serene.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 109)
 
Old 07-12-2013, 06:02 PM   #71
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
To read the words of Abdul-Baha on this subject (happiness), to hear their spiritual meaning and to bathe in their warmth, is to find deep inner joy and inspiration. A very few examples follow:
‘Joy gives us wings! In times of joy our strength is more vital, our intellect keener, and our understanding less clouded. We seem better able to cope with the world and to find our sphere of usefulness. But when sadness visits us we become weak, our strength leaves us, our comprehension is dim and our intelligence veiled. The actualities of life seem to elude our grasp, the eyes of our spirits fail to discover the sacred mysteries, and we become even as dead beings.’
‘Never be depressed.’
‘Never is it the wish of Abdul-Baha to see any being hurt, nor will He make anyone to grieve; for man can receive no greater gift than this, that he rejoice anothers heart.’
‘Remember the saying: “Of all pilgrimages the greatest is to relieve the sorrow-laden heart.”
‘.......know thou that delivering the Message can be accomplished only through goodly deeds and spiritual happiness reflected from the face of that one who is expanding the Teachings.’
‘Strive then to the best of thine ability to let these children know that a Baha’i is one who embodies all the perfections, that he must shine out like a lighted taper-not be darkness upon darkness and yet bear the name Baha’i.’
‘In a time to come, morals will degenerate to an extreme degree. It is essential that children be reared in the Baha’i way, that they may find happiness, not for sorrow; for pleasure, not for grief. happiness is life; sorrow is death. Spiritual happiness is life eternal . . . . This great blessing and precious gift is obtained by man only through the guidance of God. . . . ‘ ‘This happiness is but the love of God.’
‘Nothing makes a man so happy as love.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 111-112)
 
Old 07-14-2013, 03:58 PM   #72
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
In Chicago the Master revealed ‘one of His most buoyant Tablets’, requested by a newspaper reporter:

Be happy! Be happy The Sun of Truth has shone!
Be happy! Be happy! The Light of the Spirit has surrounded the world!
Be happy! Be Happy! The doors of the Kingdom are opened!
Be happy! Be happy! The Song of the supreme Concourse is raised!
Be happy! Be happy! The breaths of the Holy spirit are life-giving and the world of man is being quickened.

Those words remind us of another passage of His:

Glad tidings!
For everlasting life is here.
O ye that sleep, awake!
O ye heedless ones, learn wisdom!
O blind, receive your sight!
O deaf, hear!
O dumb, speak!
O dead, arise!
Be happy!
Be happy!
Be full of joy.

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 113)
 
Old 07-25-2013, 06:21 PM   #73
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Baha’s generousity was natural to Him already in childhood. A story is recorded of the time when young Abbas Effendi went to the mountains to see the thousands of sheep which His Father then owned. The shepherds, wishing to honour their young Guest, gave Him a feast. Before Abbas was taken home at the close of the day, the head shepherd advised Him that it was customary under the circumstances to leave a present for the shepherds. Abbas told the man He had nothing to give. Yet the shepherd persisted that He must give something. Whereupon the Master gave them all the sheep.
We are told that when Baha’u’llah heard about this incident, He laughed and commented, ‘We will have to protect Abdul-Baha from Himself – some day he will give himself away.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 58)
 
Old 07-25-2013, 06:21 PM   #74
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Baha’s generousity was natural to Him already in childhood. A story is recorded of the time when young Abbas Effendi went to the mountains to see the thousands of sheep which His Father then owned. The shepherds, wishing to honour their young Guest, gave Him a feast. Before Abbas was taken home at the close of the day, the head shepherd advised Him that it was customary under the circumstances to leave a present for the shepherds. Abbas told the man He had nothing to give. Yet the shepherd persisted that He must give something. Whereupon the Master gave them all the sheep.
We are told that when Baha’u’llah heard about this incident, He laughed and commented, ‘We will have to protect Abdul-Baha from Himself – some day he will give himself away.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 58)
 
Old 07-26-2013, 09:14 AM   #75
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
It’s often said ‘Abdu’l-Baha could make someone feel like the only person in the room.
Over and over in His travels through North America a century ago, the son of the Faith’s founder, Baha’u’llah, would stop everything to pay a person rapt attention. He would avoid interrupting and resist debating — no matter how illogical a view might be.

It’s an example Baha’is are learning to follow as they engage those they encounter in meaningful and distinctive spiritual conversation.
They know true conversation comes about through trust, and many times only after a person has emptied his or her cup of needs and wants, passions and interests, frustrations and triumphs.

As in the examples here.

An educator learns true teaching
Winona Lineberger, who serves the Faith as a pioneer to San José, Costa Rica, recalls vividly her first contact with a Baha’i.
She was living in Samoa at the time, a Roman Catholic nun and educator.
She was accustomed to teaching the young her faith through lessons “primed down to the last minute,” leaving little time for “thoughtful questions or comments from the youth.”
“Ask me after class” was her standard response to those who did raise a hand, and very seldom did they take her up on the offer.
“As soon as they heard ‘Class dismissed,’ off they escaped as fast as human beings can emulate cheetahs,” recalls Lineberger.
“Forget it, Sister, you didn’t listen, so now maybe I don’t even remember what the question was.”
Then she met Marc Vloubergh, who had traveled from Belgium to support the Samoan Baha’i community in sharing the Faith’s teachings.
She attended a “fireside” talk he gave on how ‘Abdu’l-Baha taught the Faith to Christians.
“Marc offered many chances to ask questions, and I noted how carefully he listened to inquirers, many of whom, like myself, were not members of his religion,” she relates.
“Moved as I already was then by a profound attraction I could not explain to the Baha’i Faith, I asked question after question, commented, rebutted, and used all the debate tactics I had learned in high school years before.
“I wanted assurance that this Faith was something authentic and not just another cult or sect going nowhere.”
Here was a teacher who didn’t just talk, says Lineberger.
“He listened thoroughly, attentively, courteously, respectfully and welcomingly, seeming to enjoy the points some of his more resistant audience were trying to make to him in pro of converting him. …
“When they proved contentious, Marc would not debate, but would smile respectfully and say, ‘Very interesting,’ reflect and then explain his response clearly.
“I noted his teaching strategy carefully, and let it all sink in slowly, digesting it and allowing its truths to envelop my soul to the very depths.
“As an educator myself, I also took note of his effective and efficient method of teaching via balancing the lectures and readings with that characteristically respectful and notably attentive listening art at which he excelled.”
Lineberger declared her belief in Baha’u’llah a year later and says now “it’s my turn to listen, emulating Marc’s impressive listening power, as people query, ‘So who is your Baha’u’llah, and who is Jesus Christ?’”
 
Old 07-31-2013, 11:59 AM   #76
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Under a grove of trees near Lake Michigan, while in Chicago in 1912, Abdul-Baha gave intimate and loving counsel to His friends: ‘Some of you may have observed that I have not called attention to any of your individual shortcomings. I would suggest to you, that if you shall be similarly considerate in your treatment of each other, it will be greatly conductive to the harmony of your association with each other.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 77)
 
Old 08-09-2013, 02:35 PM   #77
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Am away for a few days will strive to add more stories when I return.

Love to all
 
Old 08-12-2013, 03:56 PM   #78
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Baha’e love in no way obscured His sense of justice. On the contrary; it heightened His awareness. Had not Baha’u’llah taught Him well that ‘The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice’?
The Master Himself, speaking of justice, declared that: ‘Its operation must be carried out in all classes, from the highest to the lowest. Justice must be sacred, and the rights of all the people must be considered. Desire for others only that which you desire for yourselves.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 93)
 
Old 08-12-2013, 03:56 PM   #79
Senior Member
 
BlinkeyBill's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Quilimari,Chile
Posts: 4,208
Abdul-Baha’e love in no way obscured His sense of justice. On the contrary; it heightened His awareness. Had not Baha’u’llah taught Him well that ‘The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice’?
The Master Himself, speaking of justice, declared that: ‘Its operation must be carried out in all classes, from the highest to the lowest. Justice must be sacred, and the rights of all the people must be considered. Desire for others only that which you desire for yourselves.’

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha page 93)
 
Old 08-12-2013, 07:37 PM   #80
Tony Bristow-Stagg
 
tonyfish58's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
From: Normanton Far North Queensland
Posts: 3,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
Am away for a few days will strive to add more stories when I return.

Love to all
Thanks Bill - They are a great read

Regards Tony
 
Reply

  Baha'i Forums > Baha'i Forums > General Discussion

Tags
glory, master, servant, stories



Search tags for this page
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Thread Tools
Display Modes



Facebook @bahaiforums RSS


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2006 - 2017 Bahai Forums. All rights reserved.