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Old 10-28-2013, 08:18 AM   #121
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Sent to myself by a dear Australian friend...............

Unstated invitation...
Harry Randall, the brother of Loulie Mathews, was a man of wealth and affairs. He had been a classmate of Harlan Ober at Harvard and so, when Harlan learned of the Faith and became a Baha'i, he very soon gave the Message to Harry, only to discover that, busy and occupied as he was with his manifold affairs, Harry Randall's interest went no farther than a polite and courteous response, which was far from satisfactory to Harlan. He persisted in trying to interest Harry further and when Abdu'l-Baha was to come to Boston, Harlan grew more and more pressing: Harry must go to hear Abdu'l-Baha speak; Harry must meet Him; Harry really owed it to himself not to miss this wonderful opportunity. Finally, Harry still uninterested, but courteously anxious to please this eager friend of his, agreed to go with Harlan to hear Abdu'l-Baha.

Ruth - Harry's wife would not be able to go with him since she was a semi invalid, in and out of sanitariums for tuberculosis a great part of the time. Just then she had come home from one of these hospitals but she was far too frail to do anything but rest quietly at home.

Harlan and Harry Randall went to the meeting together and after it was over, Harlan insisted upon taking Harry to meet Abdu'l-Baha. Harry. still uninterested but always courteous, did as Harlan wished, and what was his astonishment when Abdu'l-Baha warmly accepted an invitation to have tea the following afternoon at Harry's home! An invitation Harry had in no way extended. Appalled, Harry asked Harlan what on earth he should do about it? Harlan said. "Give a tea for Him what else can you do?" "But how can I? Ruth is ill. I'm busy. How on earth - ?" Harlan laughed, "You don't know Abdu'l-Baha or you'd know there's some sort of reason for this, and it'll get done. You have a houseful of servants - let them brew a cup of tea for the Master and invite a few friends in to share it." So this is what Harry did and the next afternoon when Abdu'l-Baha arrived at the lovely suburban home he found quite a group of people assembled on a wide verandah to receive Him. Ruth Randall, delicate and lovely, was also there, seated in a far corner where she might be safe from any draft. And it was to her, ignoring all the others, that Abdu'l-Baha strode, His white aba billowing with the swiftness of His tread; His beautiful eyes filled with light and love. Reaching her He bent above her, murmuring "My daughter My dear daughter" and lovingly He rested His hands on her shoulders Then He turned and, smilingly, met all the other guests.

The following day, Ruth had an appointment with her doctor, who had examined her the previous week and had said that it might be necessary for her to return to the sanitarium for further treatment. He would be sure after he had seen her again. Ruth went to this appointment fearfully she was so longing to remain at home, so very reluctant to be sent again to the hospital. The doctor examined her - and was amazed. What had she been doing? What could have happened to her? She was healed. There was not the least trace left of the tuberculosis. Of course, this was an experience that neither Harry nor Ruth could ignore, so it was the beginning of their long and glorious life-time of teaching and serving the Cause they came to love so well.


Told to me by Harlan Ober
at Green Acre Summer 1934
 
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Old 10-29-2013, 05:08 PM   #122
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Driving home, we came to the most spectacular waterfall, foaming
down a black precipice. The Master peremptorily stopped the car and with a sort of excitement got out of it; then walked to the very edge of the precipice. After standing there for some time, His eyes fixed on that long, shining torrent, which seemed to be shaking off diamonds in a fury, He seated Himself on a rock hanging over the deep abyss. I can still see that Figure of quiet Power perilously poised above the precipice, that still, rapt Face delighting in some secret way in the beauty of the waterfall. Tears came to Laura’s eyes and mine. During the whole drive He was always discovering lovely things and with vivid animation pointing them out to us: the bright green of the fields and hills, the neat villages, a spire rising from a cluster of Swiss houses, or from some lonely spot on a mountain. A tiny village, high among the peaks, caught His eye … It was just after we left the waterfall that the Master turned, smiling, to me. “If I come to America, Juliet, will you invite Me to see such waterfalls?”
(Diary of Juliet Thompson, p. 78-79)
 
Old 10-30-2013, 05:03 AM   #123
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Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
During the whole drive ['Abdu'l-Baha] was always discovering lovely things ... a spire rising from a cluster of Swiss houses....
Hmmm.

This interesting, though I don't recall ever hearing that 'Abdu'l-Baha had visited Switzerland (though he was nearby, in Thonon-les-Bains, France).

Perhaps this simply refers to the architectural styles of the houses rather than to a specific place.

Peace, :-)

Bruce
 
Old 10-30-2013, 01:05 PM   #124
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Originally Posted by BruceDLimber View Post


Hmmm.

This interesting, though I don't recall ever hearing that 'Abdu'l-Baha had visited Switzerland (though he was nearby, in Thonon-les-Bains, France).

Perhaps this simply refers to the architectural styles of the houses rather than to a specific place.

Peace, :-)

Bruce
Smile, I am not sure of all the places that the Master visited while in Europe?

But as for this quote, you would have to ask Juliet Thompson as apparently it is in her Diary. Big smile

Peace and loving thoughts to you.
 
Old 11-01-2013, 08:39 AM   #125
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Ego

The local Opera House had been rented for Abu’l-Fadl’s talks and it was packed. Probably more than a thousand people had come. And, before this crowd Abu’l-Fadl rose to speak. For a moment, he stood there, his eyes roving over all the lifted, waiting faces, and suddenly he thought ‘This trip is proving very successful! I am doing very well, this is a cause for great pride and satisfaction and when I return to Acca the Master will be well pleased with me. Truly I am doing well.’ And, with this thought, the mind of Abu’l-Fadl went completely blank. He did not know who he was or why he was standing on this platform with all these people looking at him or what he was supposed to say. Then, instantly he realized what had happened. He had taken it upon himself to feel that it was HE who had accomplished this success; it was HIS words that would reach the hearts; it was HE - HE - HE - who had been proud. And, as he realized this he turned, in abject shame, to Bahá’u’lláh, imploring His forgiveness and begging Him to fill his heart once more with His Light to move his lips again with His Word. And immediately Abu’l-Fadl’s prayer was answered, and the talk went forward. Later, Abu’l-Fadl asked Dr. Khan how long it had been that he stood there tongue-tied and blank - for it had seemed to Abu’l-Fadl that he must have disgraced himself before that great audience. But Khan assured him that it had been no time at all that there had been no break in the discourse. But it is to be noted that - many years afterward - ‘Abdu’l-Bahá particularly praised Abu’l-Fadl for being one of the very rare souls who never used the pronouns ‘I’ or ‘me’ or ‘mine‘.
(Reginald Grant Barrow, Mother’s Stories: Stories of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and Early Believers told by Muriel Ives Barrow Newhall to her son, p. 7)
 
Old 11-02-2013, 06:26 AM   #126
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Juliet Thompson was also there when ‘Abdu’l-Bahá was introduced Admiral Peary, who had just succeeded in publicly disgracing Captain Cook and proving himself, and not Captain Cook, the discoverer of the North Pole. Juliet said that: … At that moment … he looked like a blown-up balloon. I was standing beside the Master when Khan brought the Admiral over and introduced him. The Master spoke charmingly to him and congratulated him on his discovery. Then, with the utmost sweetness, added these surprising words: “For a very long time the world had been much concerned about the North Pole, where it was and what was to be found there. Now he, Admiral Peary, had discovered it and nothing was to be found there: and so, in forever relieving the public mind, he had rendered a great service.” I shall never forget Peary’s nonplussed face. The balloon collapsed! ‘Abdu’l-Bahá also suggested that the Admiral should explore the invisibilities of the Kingdom.
(Earl Redman, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in Their Midst, p. 97-98 )
 
Old 11-04-2013, 12:42 PM   #127
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Self Pity

Among the women who came out of their homeland was the sorrowing Fatimih Begum, widow of the King of Martyrs. She was a holy leaf of the Tree of God. From her earliest youth she was beset with uncounted ordeals. First was the disaster which overtook her noble father in the environs of Badasht, when, after terrible suffering, he died in a desert caravanserai, died hard—helpless and far from home. The child was left an orphan, and in distress, until, by God’s grace, she became the wife of the King of Martyrs. But since he was known everywhere as a Bahá’í, was an impassioned lover of Bahá’u’lláh, a man distracted, carried away, and since Násiri‘d-Dín Sháh thirsted for blood—the hostile lurked in their ambush, and every day they informed against him and slandered him afresh, started a new outcry and set new mischief afoot. For this reason his family was never sure of his safety for a single day, but lived from moment to moment in anguish, foreseeing and dreading the hour of his martyrdom. Here was the family, everywhere known as Bahá’ís; their enemies, stony-hearted tyrants; their government inflexibly, permanently against them; their reigning Sovereign rabid for blood. It is obvious how life would be for such a household. Every day there was a new incident, more turmoil, another uproar, and they could not draw a breath in peace. Then, he was martyred. The Government proved brutal and savage to such a degree that the human race cried out and trembled. All his possessions were stripped away and plundered, and his family lacked even their daily bread. Fatimih spent her nights in weeping; till dawn broke, her only companions were tears. Whenever she gazed on her children, she would sigh, wearing away like a candle in devouring grief. But then she would thank God, and she would say: “Praised be the Lord, these agonies, these broken fortunes are on Bahá’u’lláh’s account, for His dear sake.” She would call to mind the defenseless family of the martyred Husayn, and what calamities they were privileged to bear in the pathway of God. And as she pondered those events, her heart would leap up, and she would cry, “Praise be to God! We too have become companions of the Prophet’s Household.” Because the family was in such straits, Bahá’u’lláh directed them to come to the Most Great Prison so that, sheltered in these precincts of abounding grace, they might be compensated for all that had passed. Here for a time she lived, joyful, thankful, and praising God. And although the son of the King of Martyrs, Mirza ‘Abdu’l-Husayn, died in the prison, still his mother, Fatimih, accepted this, resigned herself to the will of God, did not so much as sigh or cry out, and did not go into mourning. Not a word did she utter to bespeak her grief. This handmaid of God was infinitely patient, dignified and reserved, and at all times thankful. But then Bahá’u’lláh left the world, and this was the supreme affliction, the ultimate anguish, and she could endure no more. The shock and alarm were such that like a fish taken from the water she writhed on the ground, trembled and shook as if her whole being quaked, until at last she took leave of her children and she died. She rose up into the shadowing mercy of God and was plunged in an ocean of light. Unto her be salutations and praise, compassion and glory. May God make sweet her resting-place with the outpourings of His heavenly mercy; in the shade of the Divine Lote-Tree [1] may He honor her dwelling.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Memorials of the Faithful, p. 174-175)
 
Old 11-04-2013, 11:36 PM   #128
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Stanwood Cobb took his 75-year-old father to see ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in Boston. His father was sympathetic to Stanwood’s attraction to the Bahá’í Faith, but claimed that he himself was too old to change. When his father met the Master, Stanwood was bewildered to see his father dominate the conversation. His father proceeded to enlighten ‘Abdu’l-Bahá about spiritual themes. Stanwood was shocked. ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, though, simply smiled and listened, covering them both with His love. Stanwood’s father left feeling that he had a wonderful interview with the Master and Stanwood learned a lesson in humility and the power of being a good listener.
(Earl Redman, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in Their Midst, p. 137)
 
Old 11-07-2013, 03:03 PM   #129
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Bahá’í poets and people of letters in Persia used to write poems in praise and glorification of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. But the resident Bahá’ís in Akká were very careful not to breathe a word about His glorious station. They knew He had often advised the poets that instead of singing His praise they ought to exalt His station of servitude and utter self-effacement. One day a laudatory letter arrived addressed to ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, composed in verse. Yunis Khan, who was serving the Master, handed the poem to ‘Abdu’l-Bahá as He was coming down the steps of the house in front of the sea. It appeared the right moment to give it to Him. He had hardly read one or two lines when He suddenly turned His face towards Yunis Khan and with the utmost sadness and a deep sense of grief said: ‘Now even you hand me letters such as this! Don’t you know the measure of pain and sorrow which overtakes Me when I hear people addressing Me with such exalted titles? Even you have not recognized me!... I consider Myself lowlier than each and every one of the loved ones of the Blessed Beauty.’ ‘Abdu’l-Bahá spoke angrily in this vein with such vigour that the heart of Yunis Khan almost stopped. His whole body became numb. He wished the earth would open and swallow him up so that he might never again see ‘Abdu’l-Bahá so grief-stricken. Only when the Master resumed His walking down the stairs was he jolted by the sound of His shoes. He quickly followed the Master and heard Him say, ‘I told the Covenant-breakers that the more they hurt Me, the more will the believers exalt My station to the point of exaggeration…’ He was very perturbed that he had brought such grief upon the Master and did not know what to do. Then he heard the Master say, ‘This is in no way the fault of the friends. They say these things because of their steadfastness, their love and devotion…’ Then He said to Yunis Khan, ‘You are very dear to Me…’ Yunis Khan realized that it was always the Master’s way never ever to allow a soul to be hurt. He received comfort and encouragement. His anguish was gone. He was filled with such an indescribable joy and ecstasy that he wished the doors of heaven would open and he could ascend to the Kingdom on high.
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá)
 
Old 11-08-2013, 09:22 AM   #130
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He called Mrs. Goodall to sit beside Him and tell Him of the California Bahá’ís. She told Him that they were in great unity, but wished that she could have brought all of them to see Him. “They are here. You did bring them.” (Earl Redman, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in Their Midst, p. 149)
 
Old 11-08-2013, 03:30 PM   #131
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8 minutes Film Abdul Baha

Friends,
I had not seen this length of film footage of Abdul Baha, some of which you are probably familiar with. It is 8 minutes long

Rare Silent Short Movie of 'Abdu'l-Baha in New York, 1912 - YouTube
 
Old 11-09-2013, 11:50 AM   #132
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Thank you dear Dale for this wonderful film of the Master.
 
Old 11-11-2013, 02:42 PM   #133
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A ‘Mrs C’ was an early believer who went to ‘Akká. She belonged to a wealthy and fashionable group of people in New York. Her life had been conventional and rather unsatisfying. She had been a sincere Christian, but somehow had not gained much comfort from her religion. She had become somewhat melancholy. While travelling abroad, she had learned about ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. She eagerly grasped His message and headed to the prison-city. Having arrived, she was fascinated by everything, most especially by the Master. She noticed that ‘Abdu’l-Bahá always greeted her with ‘Be happy!’ The other members of the party were not addressed in the same way by Him. This troubled her. Finally she asked someone to ask the Master why He addressed her in this way. With ‘His peculiarly illuminating smile‘, He replied, ‘I tell you to be happy because we can not know the spiritual life unless we are happy!’ ‘Then Mrs C’s dismay was complete, and her diffidence vanished with the fullness of her despair.
‘”But tell me, what is the spiritual life?” she cried, “I have heard ever since I was born about the spiritual life, and no one could ever explain to me what it is!” ‘Abdu’l-Bahá looked at His questioner again with that wonderful smile of His, and said gently: “Characterize thyself with the characteristics of God, and thou shalt know the spiritual life!”’ – few words, but they were sufficient. The characteristics of God? They must be such attributes as love and beauty, justice and generosity. ‘All day long her mind was flooded with the divine puzzle, and all day long she was happy. She did not give a thought to her duties, and yet when she arrived at the moment of her evening’s reckoning, she could not remember that she had left them undone.
‘At last she began to understand. If she was absorbed in Heavenly ideals, they would translate themselves into deeds necessarily, and her days and nights would be full of light. From that moment she never quite forgot the divine admonition that had been granted her: “Characterize thyself with the characteristics of God!” ‘And she learned to know the spiritual life.’ (Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 133)
 
Old 11-12-2013, 03:20 PM   #134
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The following Sufi poem was not written about Abdul-Baha, but I found it an interesting poem, concerning the Ocean of Knowledge, which of course is what Baha'u'llah had and presented to the world.

Conversation with the Inner Master

Taking me beside the shore,
The Master asked:
Here is a book and here is the sea.
Which one you choose?

I looked down at my heart,
And my heart whispered: sea.
So I whispered back to my master,
'Sea'.

He said congratulations.
Never make yourself limited by limited knowledge,
But seek knowledge among the signs in nature.

The pages of the book will finish, and
It’s value will come to an end.

But the flow of the sea will never cease,
The waves are infinite.

(c) MysticSaint. Singapore

As of course is the infinite knowledge of Baha'u'llah for the soul who searches and studies the Words of Baha'u'llah, different lessons and knowledge keep appearing as the waves of the sea.
 
Old 11-12-2013, 08:01 PM   #135
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Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
The following Sufi poem was not written about Abdul-Baha, but I found it an interesting poem, concerning the Ocean of Knowledge, which of course is what Baha'u'llah had and presented to the world.

Conversation with the Inner Master

Taking me beside the shore,
The Master asked:
Here is a book and here is the sea.
Which one you choose?

I looked down at my heart,
And my heart whispered: sea.
So I whispered back to my master,
'Sea'.

He said congratulations.
Never make yourself limited by limited knowledge,
But seek knowledge among the signs in nature.

The pages of the book will finish, and
It’s value will come to an end.

But the flow of the sea will never cease,
The waves are infinite.

(c) MysticSaint. Singapore

As of course is the infinite knowledge of Baha'u'llah for the soul who searches and studies the Words of Baha'u'llah, different lessons and knowledge keep appearing as the waves of the sea.
That is great Bill yes it reflects a lot of Passages in the Baha'i Writings

Regards Tony
 
Old 11-14-2013, 10:36 AM   #136
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On one of His visits to New York He stayed with Juliet Thompson on West 10th Street not far from Fifth Avenue. Two or three doors away and across the street, the poet Khalil Gibran was staying with friends. He and ‘Abdu’l-Bahá had met in Syria so now they met again. Gibran said that he believed in everything Bahá’u’lláh had taught, but that he would never declare himself as a Bahá’í because he had his own message to give to mankind and he wished this to remain clearly his. However, said Gibran, he would like to do something for ‘Abdu’l-Bahá - so what might he do? “‘Abdu’l-Bahá was pleased and said, very good - go write me a book and the famous Jesus, Son of Man by Khalil Gibran’s was that book.
(Reginald Grant Barrow, Mother’s Stories: Stories of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and Early Believers told by Muriel Ives Barrow Newhall to her son, p. 40)
 
Old 11-16-2013, 03:55 PM   #137
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Stanwood Cobb wrote that Abdu’l Bahá ‘almost never stood still when He spoke. He paced back and forth and His words were enhanced rather than diminished by the presence of the translator. Abdu’l Bahá would make a statement which the translator would then translate. While the translator put the words into English Abdu’l Bahá would stand and smile, occasionally nodding to affirm important points or as if to approve of the translation. He constantly illumined this translation with the dynamic power of His own spiritual personality. When He spoke: ‘the Persian words … boomed forth almost as musically as in operatic recitatives. While He spoke, He was in constant and majestic motion. To hear Him was an experience unequalled in any other kind of platform delivery. It was a work of art, as well as a spiritual service. First, would come the spiritual flow of thought, musically expressed in a foreign tongue. Then, as the translator set forth its meaning to us, we had the added pleasure of watching Abdu’l Bahá’s response to the art of the translator. It was, all in all, a highly colorful and dramatic procedure.
(Earl Redman, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in Their Midst, p. 74)
 
Old 11-18-2013, 12:41 PM   #138
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The first person singular seldom crept into the Master’s speech. He once told group of New York friends that in the future the words ‘I’ and ‘Me’ and ‘Mine’ would be regarded as profane. Lua Getsinger reported that one day she and Georgie Ralston were driving with the Master. He closed His eyes and apparently fell asleep. Lua and Georgie talked on, probably about their own concerns, for suddenly the Master’s eyes sprang open and He laughed. ‘I, me, my, mine: words of the Devil!’ He said.
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá)
 
Old 11-18-2013, 12:55 PM   #139
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The first person singular seldom crept into the Master’s speech. He once told group of New York friends that in the future the words ‘I’ and ‘Me’ and ‘Mine’ would be regarded as profane. Lua Getsinger reported that one day she and Georgie Ralston were driving with the Master. He closed His eyes and apparently fell asleep. Lua and Georgie talked on, probably about their own concerns, for suddenly the Master’s eyes sprang open and He laughed. ‘I, me, my, mine: words of the Devil!’ He said.
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá)
It is important to point out that the stories of Abdul-Baha are somewhat apocryphal in nature, their authenticity has no guarantee.
 
Old 11-18-2013, 08:54 PM   #140
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The first person singular seldom crept into the Master’s speech. He once told group of New York friends that in the future the words ‘I’ and ‘Me’ and ‘Mine’ would be regarded as profane. Lua Getsinger reported that one day she and Georgie Ralston were driving with the Master. He closed His eyes and apparently fell asleep. Lua and Georgie talked on, probably about their own concerns, for suddenly the Master’s eyes sprang open and He laughed. ‘I, me, my, mine: words of the Devil!’ He said.
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá)
This is a great one Bill :-) Shows the great sense of Humor that the Master had all the while He suffered for this Faith, Or should a person say willingly served it with all his Capacity for all His Life!

But there is wisdom in this even if the story is not 100% accurate, It could be said it will not be far from fact.

P/S Edited this and took out all the reference to I's I had unknowingly put in :-)

Regards Tony

Last edited by tonyfish58; 11-18-2013 at 08:56 PM.
 
Old 11-18-2013, 10:53 PM   #141
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This is a great one Bill :-) Shows the great sense of Humor that the Master had all the while He suffered for this Faith, Or should a person say willingly served it with all his Capacity for all His Life!

But there is wisdom in this even if the story is not 100% accurate, It could be said it will not be far from fact.

P/S Edited this and took out all the reference to I's I had unknowingly put in :-)

Regards Tony
Yes indeed wisdom

As an old dinosaur I have stopped worrying about using the word I. I leave these wise things for the future generations.

I have learn't to accept myself, as I am. And look to the Mercy of God.

But I often think of the future and how wonderful it will be, I have full faith in the Masters words.
 
Old 11-18-2013, 10:58 PM   #142
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It is important to point out that the stories of Abdul-Baha are somewhat apocryphal in nature, their authenticity has no guarantee.
That may be or may not be, I am not the judge.
But I do know that the teachings of Baha'u'llah also teach about the word I and the ego, so for me I can believe this story holds truth.
 
Old 11-19-2013, 10:05 AM   #143
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That may be or may not be, I am not the judge.
But I do know that the teachings of Baha'u'llah also teach about the word I and the ego, so for me I can believe this story holds truth.
Do you have a quote from the Writings of Baha'u'llah anathematising use of the word "I"?
 
Old 11-19-2013, 08:43 PM   #144
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Do you have a quote from the Writings of Baha'u'llah anathematising use of the word "I"?
As this thread is about the Master let us give some quotes from Him

Anathematising - Wow why do we need this word?

I used by us humans, to me is a reflection of Self IMHO - Every time we use I it is usually self based!

I love this passage very much as it is how I feel about Faith in this time of mans progress, we spend far too much time on subjects that have no benefit to help mankind out of its waywardness;

"Even as the clouds let us shed down tears, and as the lightning flashes let us laugh at our coursings through east and west. By day, by night, let us think but of spreading the sweet savours of God. Let us not keep on forever with our fancies and illusions, with our analysing and interpreting and circulating of complex dubieties. Let us put aside all thoughts of self; let us close our eyes to all on earth, let us neither make known our sufferings nor complain of our wrongs. Rather let us become oblivious of our own selves, and drinking down the wine of heavenly grace, let us cry out our joy, and lose ourselves in the beauty of the All-Glorious" Selections From the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá Bahá'í Reference Library - Selections From the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Pages 234-238

"O army of God! Whensoever ye behold a person whose entire attention is directed toward the Cause of God; whose only aim is this, to make the Word of God to take effect; who, day and night, with pure intent, is rendering service to the Cause; from whose behaviour not the slightest trace of egotism or private motives is discerned—who, rather, wandereth distracted in the wilderness of the love of God, and drinketh only from the cup of the knowledge of God, and is utterly engrossed in spreading the sweet savours of God, and is enamoured of the holy verses of the Kingdom of God—know ye for a certainty that this individual will be supported and reinforced by heaven; that like unto the morning star, he will forever gleam brightly out of the skies of eternal grace. But if he show the slightest taint of selfish desires and self love, his efforts will lead to nothing and he will be destroyed and left hopeless at the last". Bahá'í Reference Library - Selections From the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Pages 69-75

I = Self A lot of wonderful Baha'is got rid of I out of life, I would love to be able, but alas I can not :-))

Regards Tony

Last edited by tonyfish58; 11-19-2013 at 08:46 PM.
 
Old 11-19-2013, 08:50 PM   #145
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Originally Posted by tonyfish58 View Post
As this thread is about the Master let us give some quotes from Him

Anathematising - Wow why do we need this word?
Hi Tony,
Ironically I was thinking to myself, "of the devil" - Wow, why do we need this phrase? But oddly some others don't see that as an anathematisation.

Quote:
I used by us humans, to me is a reflection of Self IMHO - Every time we use I it is usually self based!
This is a personal opinion you are very much entitled to.

Quote:
I love this passage very much as it is how I feel about Faith in this time of mans progress, we spend far too much time on subjects that have no benefit to help mankind out of its waywardness;

"Even as the clouds let us shed down tears, and as the lightning flashes let us laugh at our coursings through east and west. By day, by night, let us think but of spreading the sweet savours of God. Let us not keep on forever with our fancies and illusions, with our analysing and interpreting and circulating of complex dubieties. Let us put aside all thoughts of self; let us close our eyes to all on earth, let us neither make known our sufferings nor complain of our wrongs. Rather let us become oblivious of our own selves, and drinking down the wine of heavenly grace, let us cry out our joy, and lose ourselves in the beauty of the All-Glorious" Selections From the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá Bahá'í Reference Library - Selections From the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Pages 234-238

"O army of God! Whensoever ye behold a person whose entire attention is directed toward the Cause of God; whose only aim is this, to make the Word of God to take effect; who, day and night, with pure intent, is rendering service to the Cause; from whose behaviour not the slightest trace of egotism or private motives is discerned—who, rather, wandereth distracted in the wilderness of the love of God, and drinketh only from the cup of the knowledge of God, and is utterly engrossed in spreading the sweet savours of God, and is enamoured of the holy verses of the Kingdom of God—know ye for a certainty that this individual will be supported and reinforced by heaven; that like unto the 72 morning star, he will forever gleam brightly out of the skies of eternal grace. But if he show the slightest taint of selfish desires and self love, his efforts will lead to nothing and he will be destroyed and left hopeless at the last". Bahá'í Reference Library - Selections From the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Pages 69-75

Regards Tony
None of those passages forbid use of the word "I", nor do they describe it as being "of the devil".
 
Old 11-19-2013, 09:00 PM   #146
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Dear Friends,

Search the Baha'i Reference library using the advanced search feature for all works of Abdul-Baha for instances of "I" alone, without even searching for "me" or "my" you will get 1,890 results. The first result listed is "I had a servant". Strange for a person who is alleged to have described use of such a word as being "of the devil". 'Nuff said?
 
Old 11-20-2013, 01:42 AM   #147
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Hi Tony,
Ironically I was thinking to myself, "of the devil" - Wow, why do we need this phrase? But oddly some others don't see that as an anathematisation.


This is a personal opinion you are very much entitled to.



None of those passages forbid use of the word "I", nor do they describe it as being "of the devil".

A light hearted retort about the Devil should just be that? It was humor :-)

The Devil is our lower selves, thus I is a reference our lower selves.

To me it is not so complicated. Just do not use I as a self reference to some form of achievement and no issue.

If One says I taught a fellow the Faith the other day thinking it as a personal achievement, then one would be implying that we did this without any assistance, whereas we know that any teaching we can achieve is a bounty from God.

But if we said I was given the Bounty to teach the Faith to a person the other day it takes the self out of I. Thus no real issue.

But splitting hairs over I is also a bit of a waste of time, this is why the passages were posted above. Lets look at the bigger picture. This thread is about the life of Abdul'baha.

There were no selfish I's in Abdul'Baha, but there is a Great I we can use. Look at me follow me be as I am with lyrics - YouTube Enjoy

Regards Tony

Last edited by tonyfish58; 11-20-2013 at 02:00 AM.
 
Old 11-20-2013, 01:47 AM   #148
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Following in the steps of Abdul'Baha

This is a thought provoking story about following in the steps of Abdul'Baha

Pilgrims’ notes tell us that one day Lua Getsinger was walking with ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and some of the friends on the white sands of the sea near ‘Akka. Lua, it is said, suddenly became aware of the Master’s tracks in the soft sand. She was walking a pace or two behind Him. Quite spontaneously she stepped behind ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and began to trace His footsteps by placing her shoes one at a time in each of His footprints. It is said that without turning, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá said sharply, ‘What are you doing?‘
Lua replied cheerily, ‘I am following in your footsteps.’ ‘Abdu’l-Bahá was silent for some time. Then He repeated more forcefully, ‘Lua, what are you doing?’ She said, ‘I am walking in your footsteps, beloved Master.’ Without a word, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá strode on. Lua, it is said, felt a chill as she realized the utter futility and presumptuousness of such a weak instrument as herself ever daring to aspire to walk in the footsteps of the ‘Mystery of God‘. Suddenly Lua felt an agonizing pain in her ankle. She looked down. She had been stung by a scorpion. She cried out, but the Master did not turn or slow His stride. Lua walked on with the utmost difficulty. Her ankle was swelling rapidly. The pain was becoming intense. But she clenched her teeth and forced herself to continue. When the suffering had become almost unbearable, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá turned and came back. ‘This‘, He told her, ‘is what it means to walk in My footsteps.’ ‘Abdu’l-Bahá touched her head gently with his hand. Lua’s eyes were brimming with tears. She understood the lesson. The Master turned and continued on His way, Lua limping after Him the best she could. She felt the pain gradually diminishing as she tried to keep up with her beloved Master.
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 124)

Regards Tony
 
Old 11-20-2013, 02:11 AM   #149
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Do you have a quote from the Writings of Baha'u'llah anathematising use of the word "I"?
Dear friend, I may have been in error when I said
Quote:
But I do know that the teachings of Baha'u'llah also teach about the word I and the ego, so for me I can believe this story holds truth.
Now I was refering to what Baha'u'llah says regarding the Ego, now of course the I is part of ego is it not? Perhaps I should have just said ego.

You say to Tony
Quote:
Ironically I was thinking to myself, "of the devil" - Wow, why do we need this phrase? But oddly some others don't see that as an anathematisation.
Now apparently this is a recollection of Lua Getsinger, someone I feel that deserves our respect and admiration. I don't know if her memory was at fault, I don't even think that way.
But the fact of the whole matter is as Lua recorded Abdul-Baha said
Quote:
He once told group of New York friends that in the future the words ‘I’ and ‘Me’ and ‘Mine’ would be regarded as profane
So we see he was talking of the future, so no you will not find it probably in the writings. (Also I trust you realise that we do not have ALL of the writings that are available, translated into English at this time.) But of course Baha'u'llah speaks volumes regarding the Ego.

I trust that this explanation clears up any problems that you have, regarding the story.
 
Old 11-20-2013, 02:37 AM   #150
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We‘re told that the station of a Bahá’í in this day is the same as the station of the prophets of old:
In confirmation of the exalted rank of the true believer, referred to by Bahá’u’lláh, He reveals the following: “The station which he who hath truly recognized this Revelation will attain is the same as the one ordained for such prophets of the house of Israel as are not regarded as Manifestations ‘endowed with constancy.’” (Shoghi Effendi, The World Order of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 110)
A Bahá’í mentioned that on pilgrimage he mentioned this quote to Shoghi Effendi, who gave her such a look ... mixed with compassion, that she understood she will never dare think that. How we have to be on guard against our ego!
 
Old 11-22-2013, 01:44 PM   #151
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Friendship

In the morning friends and seekers surrounded ‘Abdu’l-Bahá like moths. He spoke to them in these words: You must have deep love for one another. Go to see each other and be consoling friends to all. If a friend lives a little distance from the town, go to see him. Do not content yourselves with words only but act according to the commandments of God. Hold weekly meetings and give feasts. Put forth your efforts to acquire spiritual perfections and to spread the knowledge of God. These are the attributes of the Bahá’ís. Otherwise, what use is there in being a Bahá’í in word alone.
(Mahmud’s Diary, Sept. 20, 1912)
 
Old 11-25-2013, 07:02 AM   #152
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Visiting the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. – an example of ‘Abdu’l-Baha’s thoroughness
During our dinner at 7:30 [on April 21, 1912] ‘Abdu’l-Baha' sat and talked with us. Mr. Parsons [Agnes Parsons’ husband] suggested going one evening to the Library of Congress to see it lighted, but never dreamed that ‘Abdu’l-Baha would wish to add another activity to this already full day. But ‘Abdu’l-Baha said "Let us go tonight."

We first went up on the elevator to the rotunda looking down on the reading room. Two of the bronze figures were examined, when Mr. Parsons turned to conduct the party to another part of the Library. When it was told to ‘Abdu’l-Baha that Mr. Parsons would like to show Him over some other part of the building, He replied, "When one undertakes to see a thing one should see it," and continued around the rotunda until He had looked carefully at and asked the name of each bronze figure. After doing this part of the Library, we went with Mr. Parsons to his Division and Abdu’l-Baha began to see it as thoroughly as He had examined the figures.

Mr. Parsons turned to me and said: If we go over this Division so thoroughly the lights will be turned off before we shall have finished. Just at this moment, Mr. [Bernard R.] Greene, the Superintendent of the building appeared, met ‘Abdu’l-Baha, and gave the order that the lights were to be left on and no doors were to be locked for the present. Thus there was time to show ‘Abdu’l-Baha the stacks, some of the machinery for moving books and also some Turkish books. And so ‘Abdu’l-Baha had the opportunity of giving us a lesson in thoroughness.

On our return home ‘Abdu’l-Baha had His evening meal and He soon went to His room, but who knows the hour this night when He ceased to pray for His children and allowed himself the so much needed rest! (Agnes Parsons, ‘Abdu’l-Baha in America, The Diary of Agnes Parson’)
 
Old 11-27-2013, 04:55 AM   #153
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‘Abdu’l-Baha tells the story of His prison life at the request of a reporter in Paris
(‘Abdu’l-Baha entered. With one impulse we arose, paying unconscious homage to the majesty of the station of servitude. Surely there can be no greater station than this! Instantly one felt an intangible something that stamped him as one apart. Try as one would it could not be defined. All that was tangible was the dome-like head with its patriarchal beard and eyes that suggested eternity. After greeting us he waved us to our seats and inquired if there were any questions we would like to ask. When informed that my editor had sent me to ascertain if he would speak of his prison life, ‘Abdu’l-Baha began at once to tell his story in a simple, impersonal way)

“At nine years of age, I was banished with my father, Baha’u’llah, on His journey of exile to Baghdad, Arabia; seventy of His followers accompanying us. This decree of exile after persistent persecution was intended to effectively stamp out of Persia what the authorities considered a dangerous movement. Baha’u’llah, His family and followers were driven from place to place.

When I was about twenty-five years old, we were moved from Constantinople to Adrianople and from there went with a guard of soldiers to the fortressed city of Acca where we were imprisoned and closely guarded.

There was no communication whatever with the outside world. Each loaf of bread was cut open by the guard to see that it contained no message. All who believed in the universal precepts of Baha’u’llah, children, men and women, were imprisoned with us. At one time there were one hundred and fifty of us together in two rooms and no one was allowed to leave the place except four people who went to the bazaar to market each morning under guard.

Acca was a fever-ridden town in Palestine. It was said that a bird attempting to fly over it would drop dead. The food was poor and insufficient, the water was drawn from a fever-infected well and the climate and conditions were such that even the natives of the town fell ill. Many soldiers succumbed and eight out of ten of our guards died. During the intense heat of that first summer, malaria, typhoid, and dysentery attacked the prisoners, so that all the men, women and children were sick at one time. There were no doctors, no medicine, no proper food and no medical treatment of any kind. I used to make broth for the people and as I had much practice, I made good broth, (said ‘Abdu’l-Baha, laughingly).

After two years of the strictest confinement, permission was granted me to find a house, so that we could live outside the prison walls but still within the fortifications. Many believers came from Persia to join us, but were not allowed to do so. Nine years passed. Sometimes we were better off and sometimes very much worse. It depended on the governor, who if he happened to be a kind and lenient ruler, would grant us permission to leave the fortification and would allow the people free access to visit the house; but when the governor was more rigorous, extra guards were place around us and often pilgrims who had come from afar were turned away.

One year before Abdu’l-Hamid was dethroned, he sent an extremely overbearing, treacherous and insulting committee of investigation. The chairman was one of the governer's staff, Arif Bey, and with him were three army commanders of varying rank.

Immediately upon his arrival, Arif Bey proceeded to try to get proof strong enough to denounce me to the Sultan and warrant sending me to Fezan, or throwing me into the sea. Fezan is a caravan station on the boundary of Tripoli, where there are no houses and no water. It is a month's journey by camel route from Acca.

The committee, after denouncing me in their report, sent word that they wanted to see me, but I declined. I assured them that I had no desire to meet them. This infuriated them and when they sent for me again I sent this word back: 'I know your purpose. You wish to incriminate me. Very well, write in your report just what you like; send me a copy with instructions as to what you want me to write, and I will seal it myself and give it to you.'

A ship came into port reputed to be the one that was to take me to Fezan or drop me into the sea. The people used to stand on the wall of the city and look at this ship; but Arif Bey, rising in supreme wrath, declared that he would return to Constantinople and bring back an order from the Sultan to have me hanged at the gate of Acca.

About this time another ship appeared in the harbor, an Italian vessel sent by order of the Italian consul. On it I was to escape by night. The friends implored me to go, but I sent this message to the captain: 'The Báb did not run away; Baha’u’llah did not run away; I shall not run away' -- so the ship sailed away after waiting three days and three nights.

It was while the Sultan's committee of investigation was homeward bound that the first historic shell was dropped into Abdu’l-Hamid's camp and the first gun of freedom was into the home of despotism. That was God's gun, (said Abdul Baha, with one of his wonderful smiles.)

When the committee reached Constantinople they had more urgent things to think of. The capital was in a state of uproar and rebellion and the committee, as members of the government staff, were delegated to investigate the insurrection. Meanwhile the people established a constitutional government and Abdu’l-Hamid was deposed.

With the advent of the Young Turk's supremacy, realized through the Society of Union and Progress, in 1898, all the political and religious prisoners of the Ottoman Empire were freed. Events took the chains from my neck and placed them about Hamid's. ‘Abdu’l-Baha came out of prison and Abdu’l-Hamid went in!

(What became of the committee? was asked).

Arif Bey, was shot with three bullets; the general was exiled; the next in rank died suddenly and the third ran away to Cairo where he sought and received help from some of the friends there.

(We are glad you are free, I said.)

(Again the wondrous smile.) Freedom is not a matter of place. It is a condition. I was thankful for the prison and the lack of liberty was very pleasing to me, for those days were passed in the path of service under the utmost difficulties and trials, bearing fruits and results.

Unless one accepts dire vicissitudes he will not attain. To me prison is freedom; troubles rest me; incarceration is an open court; death is life and to be despised is honor. Therefore, I was happy all that time in prison. When one is released from the prison of self, that is indeed freedom, for self is the greater prison. When this release takes place, one can never be imprisoned. They used to put my feet in stocks so, (and he put out his feet before him to illustrate and laughed as though it were a joke he enjoyed.)

I would say to the guard 'You cannot imprison me, for here I have light and air and bread and water. There will come a time when my body will be in the ground and I shall have neither light nor air nor food nor water, but even then I shall not be imprisoned.' The afflictions which come to humanity sometimes tend to center the consciousness upon the limitations. This is a veritable prison. Release comes by making of the will a door through which the confirmations of the spirit come.

(What do you mean by the confirmations of the spirit? I asked.)

The confirmations of the spirit are all those powers and gifts with which some are born and which men sometimes call genius, but for which others have to strive with infinite pains. They come to that man or woman who accepts his life with radiant acquiescence.”

(Radiant acquiescence -- that was the quality with which we were suddenly seemed inspired as Abdul Baha bade us good-bye.) (‘Abdu'l-Baha, quoted by Isabel Chamberlain (d. 1939), who compiled the book, ‘Abdu’l-Baha on Divine Philosophy’, consisting of talks delivered in Paris.)
 
Old 11-30-2013, 05:32 PM   #154
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A funny incident while in the company of the Master

Although ‘Abdu’l-Baha was a serious expounder of the Baha’i Faith He had a fine sense of humor. One day at dinner, we were eating soup, a nice thick soup. Leaving my spoon in the plate I raised my hand to adjust my collar. As I brought down my hand my elbow came in contact with the handle of the spoon. And soup was spread upon the whiskers of the Persian believer on my right. Of course, I was terribly embarrassed. However, ‘Abdu’l-Baha, observing the incident quickly said: “Do not worry. That is a blessing” and laughed aloud. My brother Wendell, then remarked: “Who gets the blessing, Bill, you or the friend with the whiskers?” And ‘Abdu’l-Baha laughed again. Wendell and I were so glad to be with ‘Abdu’l-Baha. At some times we were quite jolly. We were mere boys of 18 and 21.
(Excerpt from the transcript of a talk given by William Copeland Dodge relating the account of his pilgrimage to ‘Akka in 1901) (To listen to and read the entire talk please visit Baha’i Talks, Messages and Articles)
 
Old 12-05-2013, 05:15 PM   #155
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Be natural, be happy…

Wendell [Dodge] and I [William Dodge] were so glad to be with ‘Abdu’l-Baha [in ‘Akka, in 1901]. At some times we were quite jolly. We were mere boys of 18 and 21. Our interpreter, Ameen Fareed, told us that we must be reverent, that when we entered the presence of the Master we must bow our heads, clasp our hands, avoid smiling. Of course we felt the rebuke. So the next time we entered the dining room, our heads were bowed, our hands clasped, and we did not smile. ‘Abdu’l-Baha passed quickly by us. He seemed to ignore us. We felt further rebuked. Returning to our room we wondered why ‘Abdu’l-Baha seemed different in His attitude toward us. Well, we decided that we were not good actors. So when we entered the dining room for the next meal, we smiled. ‘Abdu’l-Baha smiled. He came over to us, took us in his arms and said: “That’s the way I want you, boys, to act -- be natural, be happy.”

(Excerpt from the transcript of a talk given by William Copeland Dodge relating the account of his pilgrimage to ‘Akka in 1901) (To listen to and read the entire talk please visit Baha’i Talks,Messages and Articles)
 
Old 12-05-2013, 08:13 PM   #156
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Be natural, be happy…

Wendell [Dodge] and I [William Dodge] were so glad to be with ‘Abdu’l-Baha [in ‘Akka, in 1901]. At some times we were quite jolly. We were mere boys of 18 and 21. Our interpreter, Ameen Fareed, told us that we must be reverent, that when we entered the presence of the Master we must bow our heads, clasp our hands, avoid smiling. Of course we felt the rebuke. So the next time we entered the dining room, our heads were bowed, our hands clasped, and we did not smile. ‘Abdu’l-Baha passed quickly by us. He seemed to ignore us. We felt further rebuked. Returning to our room we wondered why ‘Abdu’l-Baha seemed different in His attitude toward us. Well, we decided that we were not good actors. So when we entered the dining room for the next meal, we smiled. ‘Abdu’l-Baha smiled. He came over to us, took us in his arms and said: “That’s the way I want you, boys, to act -- be natural, be happy.”

(Excerpt from the transcript of a talk given by William Copeland Dodge relating the account of his pilgrimage to ‘Akka in 1901) (To listen to and read the entire talk please visit Baha’i Talks,Messages and Articles)
That one Bill is a very good Meditation to Life and a Great lesson for Us Baha'is

How different we are and how we must let people grow as/by themselves.

Regards Tony
 
Old 12-06-2013, 03:08 AM   #157
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That one Bill is a very good Meditation to Life and a Great lesson for Us Baha'is

How different we are and how we must let people grow as/by themselves.

Regards Tony
Hello dear Tony.

Do you see me here standing by the sea and waving across the ocean to you

Yes we all walk our path to God, but none on the same path we are all unique, and have our own path to tread. Was reading just yesterday Abdul-Baha advising us to live the life, no matter what those around us are doing, we are not to look at others lives, but concentrate on our own farrow, then the world may be changed.

Keep well dear friend and above all HAPPY.
 
Old 12-06-2013, 01:22 PM   #158
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Hello dear Tony.

Do you see me here standing by the sea and waving across the ocean to you

Yes we all walk our path to God, but none on the same path we are all unique, and have our own path to tread. Was reading just yesterday Abdul-Baha advising us to live the life, no matter what those around us are doing, we are not to look at others lives, but concentrate on our own farrow, then the world may be changed.

Keep well dear friend and above all HAPPY.
Bill - I see my friend, but not with my eyes.

The Chilli Trip seems to be on our list of to do now

There is a good chance that when the Temple opens, My Wife and I will be there, that of course is God Willing.

As my wife is not a Baha'i, the trip will be for Tourist reasons with time out for me to share that momentous occasion with all that are there. Of course hopefully you and your wife will be there as well!

Fingers Crossed and Stay Well Stay Happy Bill & all the best to the extended Family.

Regards Tony
 
Old 12-07-2013, 05:06 AM   #159
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‘Abdu’l-Baha tells the story of Baha’u’llah’s agreement to perform any miracle agreed on by the divines
It often happened that in Baghdád certain Muhammadan ‘ulamá, Jewish rabbis and Christians met together with some European scholars, in a blessed reunion: each one had some question to propose, and although they were possessed of varying degrees of culture, they each heard a sufficient and convincing reply, and retired satisfied. Even the Persian ‘ulamá who were at Karbilá and Najaf chose a wise man whom they sent on a mission to Him; his name was Mullá Hasan ‘Amú. He came into the Holy Presence, and proposed a number of questions on behalf of the ‘ulamá, to which Bahá’u’lláh replied. Then Hasan ‘Amú said, “The ‘ulamá recognize without hesitation and confess the knowledge and virtue of Bahá’u’lláh, and they are unanimously convinced that in all learning he has no peer or equal; and it is also evident that he has never studied or acquired this learning; but still the ‘ulamá say, ‘We are not contented with this; we do not acknowledge the reality of his mission by virtue of his wisdom and righteousness. Therefore, we ask him to show us a miracle in order to satisfy and tranquilize our hearts.’”

Bahá’u’lláh replied, “Although you have no right to ask this, for God should test His creatures, and they should not test God, still I allow and accept this request. But the Cause of God is not a theatrical display that is presented every hour, of which some new diversion may be asked for every day. If it were thus, the Cause of God would become mere child’s play.

“The ‘ulamás must, therefore, assemble, and, with one accord, choose one miracle, and write that, after the performance of this miracle they will no longer entertain doubts about Me, and that all will acknowledge and confess the truth of My Cause. Let them seal this paper, and bring it to Me. This must be the accepted criterion: if the miracle is performed, no doubt will remain for them; and if not, We shall be convicted of imposture.” The learned man, Hasan ‘Amú, rose and replied, “There is no more to be said”; he then kissed the knee of the Blessed One although he was not a believer, and went. He gathered the ‘ulamá and gave them the sacred message. They consulted together and said, “This man is an enchanter; perhaps he will perform an enchantment, and then we shall have nothing more to say.” Acting on this belief, they did not dare to push the matter further.

This man, Hasan ‘Amú, mentioned this fact at many meetings. After leaving Karbilá he went to Kirmansháh and Tihrán and spread a detailed account of it everywhere, laying emphasis on the fear and the withdrawal of the ‘ulamá.
(‘Abdu’l-Baha, ‘Some Answered Questions’)
 
Old 12-10-2013, 11:07 PM   #160
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From the writings of the Master.

In sooth, there will be found in those regions certain persons like the Pharisees of the time of Christ, who, night and day, will exert themselves with all heart and soul to cast forth doubts, in order that they may deprive the souls of the glad-tidings of the Holy Spirit. They will disseminate false rumors and utter many a calumny and will publish and announce (false) stories. They will undertake all these only for the sake of earthly vanities.
And some Pharisees among the missionaries of the Gospel will hasten thither from Persia and say, “We are aware of the secret of the matter.” All they may say is sheer slander.
Now know you these [things], that in its time you may dispel and annihilate the darkness of those suspicions, like unto a manifest light. I beg of God that He may grant thee a power that thou mayest resist all in the earth—how much more these weak, hired individuals who receive salary and bribe for spreading such calumnies!

Be ye admonished, O possessors of understanding!

Tablets of Abdul-Baha Abbas. Page 730
 
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