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Old 03-29-2013, 01:08 PM   #1
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Stories of the Master (Servant of Glory)

Extract from a talk by Hand of the Cause of God A.Q. Faizi in 1969 in Australia:

'Abdu'l-Baha traveled in Europe after He had been released from prison, and he traveled in America too, to propagate the Faith of His Father. One of the greatest and cruellest enemies, one of the princes of Persia , was in Europe at the same time as 'Abdu'l-Baha. One day he went to 'Abdu'l-Baha and said, "I have come to ask you one question. Look at me, my hat is covered with diamonds, my garments have all sorts of jewels, and yet when I walk in the streets, nobody looks at me or pays any attention to me. And yet, when you walk in the streets and you have the simplest garment in the world, everyone makes way for you. They come to you. There are always hundreds of people at your door. I want to know why."

'Abdu'l-Baha knew him and knew that because of him many of the Baha'is had been put to death. Therefore he told him, "Your Highness, will you sit down a little and I will tell you a story." The prince sat down. The name of that prince was Zillu's Sultan, the son of Nasiri'd-Din Shah. The Master said: "Once a wise man passed the square of a certain town and found one of the richest people of that town gloomy and sad, brooding over his sorrows in the corner of the square. He went to him and asked, "What is the matter with you?' He answered, 'I have enough money to be the greatest merchant in this town, but I am not satisfied. I want to be greater than that.' The wise man said, 'For instance, what would you like to be?' The merchant replied, `I want to be the governor of this town.' The wise man said, 'If I make you the governor of this province, not the town, but the whole province, will you be satisfied? Please search your heart and give me the true answer.' The man pondered and then said: 'Honestly, I will not be satisfied. I want to be a minister.' 'I will make you a Minister, but give me another honest answer, will you be satisfied?' After that, he wanted to be King of the country, and the wise man said, 'I will make you the king, will you then be happy and satisfied? Do you want anything beyond that?' The man replied, 'After that there is nothing.' 'Abdu'l-Baha then said to the prince, "Your Highness, I am that nothing."

"A divine Mine only can yield the gems of divine knowledge, and the fragrance of the mystic Flower can be inhaled only in the ideal Garden, and the lilies of ancient wisdom can blossom nowhere except in the city of a stainless heart. "
Baha'u'llah
 
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Old 03-29-2013, 01:24 PM   #2
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Very interesting story Bill. Thanks for sharing!
 
Old 03-29-2013, 01:49 PM   #3
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Lua Gestinger, one of the early Baha'is of America, tells of an experience she had in Akka. She had made the pilgrimage to the prison-city to see 'Abdu'l-Baha. One day He said to her that He was too busy today to call upon a friend of His who was very poor and sick. He wished Lua to go in His place. He told her to take food to the sick man and care for him as He had been doing.
Lua learned the address and immediately went to do as 'Abdu'l-Baha had asked. She felt proud that 'Abdu'l-Baha had trusted her with some of His own work. But soon she returned to 'Abdu'l-Baha in a state of excitement. "Master," she exclaimed, "You sent me to a very terrible place! I almost fainted from the awful smell, the dirty rooms, the degrading condition of that man and his house. I left quickly before I could catch some terrible disease." Sadly and sternly, 'Abdu'l-Baha gazed at her. If she wanted to serve God, He told her, she would have to serve her fellow man, because in every person she should see the image and likeness of God. Then He told her to go back to the man's house. If the house was dirty, she should clean it. If the man was dirty, she should bathe him. If he was hungry, she should feed him. He asked her not to come back until all of this was done. 'Abdu'l-Baha has done these things many times for this man, and he told Lua Getsinger that she should be able to do them once. This is how 'Abdu'l-Baha taught Lua to serve her fellow man. (Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha)
 
Old 03-29-2013, 05:44 PM   #4
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Two ladies from Scotland, delighted that their request to have an evening with the Master while He was in London had been granted, were warmly received by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. How they relished having this intimate evening! Half an hour passsed in His warm presence, when suddenly they were filled with consternation—an aggressive reporter strode into their midst and seated himself—he wanted information about the Master. His talkative, impolite manner left the ladies speechless—such an intrusion could spoil that precious evening. Then, to their surprise, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stood up and, beckoning the reporter to follow Him, led the way into His room. The ladies had indeed got rid of the intruder, but they had also lost ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. What were they to do? Before long the hostess went into the Master’s secretary and asked that He be informed ‘that the ladies with whom the appointment had been made are awaiting His pleasure.’ Very soon kind words of farewell were heard. Then the Master returned, pausing by the door. Gravely, He looked at each and said, ‘You were making that poor man uncomfortable, so strongly desiring his absence; I took him away to make him feel happy.’

(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 54
 
Old 03-29-2013, 05:57 PM   #5
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I remember a story of a Christian minister who interviewed Abdu'l-Baha in a decidedly unfriendly manner, and afterwards Abdu'l-Baha hugged him and grabbed a nearby bouquet of flowers to put into his arms. Can anyone help me find that?

I also remember a story about a woman who felt hurt when she saw someone come back from seeing Abdu'l-Baha, with a bouquet of flowers that she had given to Abdu'l-Baha!
 
Old 03-30-2013, 08:30 AM   #6
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The Master's life was centered on God, not on Himself.
To do God's will, to be His servant, were His concerns.

He disliked photographs of Himself, permitting them only to satisfy His friends. "But to have a picture of oneself," He said, "is to emphasise the personality, which is merely the lamp, and is quite unimportant.
The light burning within the lamp has only real significance.
(Vignettes from the life of Abdul-Baha, - Annamarie Honnold, p12-13)
 
Old 03-30-2013, 08:43 AM   #7
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One day Abdul-Baha was going from Akká to Haifa and asked for a seat in the stage coach. The driver, surprised, said "Your Excellency surely wishes a private carriage, "No" replied the Master. While He was still in the coach the in Haifa, a distressed fisherwoman came to Him; all day she had caught nothing and now must return to her hungry family. The Master gave her five francs, then turned to the driver and said; "You now see the reason why I would not take a private carriage, Why should I ride in luxury when so many are starving?"
 
Old 03-30-2013, 09:34 AM   #8
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Thank you for the story Jim
 
Old 03-30-2013, 09:35 AM   #9
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Being on time……a lesson learnt.
Kindness lies at the heart of loving discipline. Abdul-Baha dearly loved His little grandson Shoghi, but he needed to learn to be on time. This he learned very early in his life ‘After receiving one good chastisement from no other hand than of his grandfather!’ He then became the first to get up for family prayers and breakfast.
(Vignettes from the life of Adul-Baha, Annamarie Honnold)
 
Old 04-13-2013, 09:22 AM   #10
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Into the lives of those He loved spilled ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s love of flowers, which He often shared with others. On one occasion a ‘little floor maid emerged from ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s suite, her arms filled with roses – beautiful roses – a gift to Him from some of the Bahá’ís. Sensing that we were friends of the Master,’ continued Ella Quant, ‘all formality fell away and with a touching gesture she exclaimed, “See what He gave me! See what He gave me!” She probably knew nothing of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s Station as the Center of God’s Covenant and the Interpreter of Bahá’u’lláh’s teaching to a needy world; she perhaps did not know His name or title, but He had shown her His love.’ (Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 97)
 
Old 04-13-2013, 09:24 AM   #11
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Corinne True told the story of a cleaning woman who greatly wished to meet ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, but was too embarrassed by her rough, work – worn hands to do so in the public reception line. Mrs. True urged her to go to ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and finally, hoping to simply touch His robe and dash away before He saw her hands, she approached the Master. As she bent over to touch His robe, He took one of her hands and raised her up. ‘Abdu’l-Bahá carefully examined the captive hand and with deep love and understanding gazed into her eyes. “Sacrifice!", He uttered simply.
(Earl Redman, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in Their Midst, p. 196)
 
Old 04-13-2013, 09:25 AM   #12
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Just before Mrs C left the household of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in ‘Akka, ‘He came into her room to say farewell, and seating Himself by the window looked off upon the sea in silence for so long a time that His guest began to wonder if He had forgotten her presence. ‘Then at length He turned to her and said, with that eager speech that is one of His peculiarities: “Mrs C when you go back to New York talk to people about the love of God. People in the world do not talk enough about God. Their conversation is filled with trivialities, and they forget the most momentous subjects. Yet is you speak to them of God they are happy, and presently they open their hearts to you. Often you can not mention this glorious Revelation, for their prejudice would interfere, and they would not listen. But you will find that you can always talk to them about the love of God.”’ ‘Then He went away, and Mrs C sat a long time in the gathering darkness, while the glory of the sun descended upon the glittering waters of the Mediterranean. The fragrant shadows seemed to echo softly with the last words of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá: “You will find that you can always talk to them about the love of God.”’ (Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 163)
 
Old 04-23-2013, 08:07 AM   #13
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Early in the days of Abdul-Baha's imprisonment in the barracks in Akká, news of His wisdom spread from a butcher's shop. He and a few of Baha'u'llah's companions had left the barracks to procure food and other necessary items from the markets. In the butchers shop where the Master waited to be served, a Muslim and a Christian were apparently expounding the merits of their respective faiths. The Christian was winning the discussion. Thereupon, Abdul-Baha entered the conversation and with simplicity and eloquence proved the validity of Islám to the satisfaction of the Christian. The news of this incident spread and warmed the hearts of many people of Akká towards the Master; this was the beginning of His immense popularity among the inhabitants of that city. There even came a time when the governor of the city, Ahmad Big Tawfíq, sent his own son to Abdul-Baha for instruction and enlightenment.
(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha)

Last edited by BlinkeyBill; 04-23-2013 at 03:11 PM. Reason: reference
 
Old 04-24-2013, 05:40 AM   #14
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And there is yet more!

Obviously at a different date, there were three brothers in high positions in Akka, all named "Jarrah" ("surgeon"):
  • the mayor of the town,
  • a colonel in the Turkish army, and
  • a physician.

ALL THREE of these brothers became so impressed with Baha'u'llah that they became Baha'is!

And indeed, the colonel's photograph (in full dress uniform) was published in a Baha'i book (Door of Hope, by David Ruhe).

That same portrait now hangs in Mazra'ieh directly across from the picture of one of the great enemies of the Faith, as I understand it so that the face in the enemy's picture can "stare" across at the Baha'i colonel and remember his own error.

And I have the bounty of knowing the fifth- and sixth-generation descendants of the colonel, who were in my community and still live near me! :-)

Peace, :-)

Bruce

Last edited by BruceDLimber; 04-24-2013 at 05:43 AM.
 
Old 04-24-2013, 07:58 AM   #15
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I love this thread!
 
Old 04-24-2013, 09:11 AM   #16
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Stanwood Cobb, renowned educator, wrote, 'This philosophy of joy was keynote of all of Abdul-Baha's teaching. "Are you happy?" was His frequent greeting to His visitors. "Be happy!"
'Those who were unhappy (and who of us are not at times!) would weep at this. And Abdul-Baha would smile as if to say, "Yes, weep on. Beyond the tears is sunshine."

'And sometimes He would wipe away with His own hands the tears from their wet cheeks, and they would leave His presence transfigured.'

In California it was observed that 'despite the Master's fatigue at times, and His physical ailments, He welcomed everyone with a beaming smile, and in His pleasing vibrant voice would ask, "Are you happy?"
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 110)
 
Old 04-24-2013, 09:24 AM   #17
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Abdul-Baha was blessed with a delightful sence of humour. He found fun in situations and stories.

'One day in the Holy Land He told Harlan Ober, an American Baha'i, that he was going to India. Harlan Ober did travel far and wide in the interests of the Faith, but at that particular time he did not cherish making that journey. A few days later Abdul-Baha told him to go to America. "But Master," Ober said, "I thought I was going to India." "So did Christopher Columbus," Abdul-Baha replied.'
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 152)
 
Old 04-26-2013, 10:17 AM   #18
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"'Abdu'l-Baha's kind heart went out to those who were ill. If He could alleviate a pain or discomfort, he set about to do so. We are told that one old couple who were ill in bed for a month had twenty visits from the Master during that time in Akka. He daily sent a servant to inquire about the welfare of the ill, and as there was no hospital in town, He paid a doctor a regular salary to look after the poor. The doctor was instructed not to tell Who provided this service. When a poor and crippled woman was shunned on contracting measles, the Master, on being informed, 'immediately engaged a woman to care for her; took a room, put comfortable bedding (His own) into it, called the doctor, sent food and everything she needed. He went to see that she had every attention, and when she died in peace and comfort, He it was Who arranged her simple funeral, paying all charges.'" (Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 43-4)
 
Old 04-26-2013, 10:22 AM   #19
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A representative from a well known society made reference to its meetings for the purpose of a search into the reality of truth, and ‘Abdu’l-Bahá said “I know of your work. I think a great deal of it. I know your desire is to serve mankind, and to draw together Humanity under the banner of Oneness; but its members must beware less it become only a discussion. Look about you. How many committees have been formed, and living for a little while, have died! Committees and Societies can not create or give life.
“People get together and talk, but it is God’s Word alone that is powerful in its results. Consider for a moment: you would not trade together if you had no income from it and derived no benefit! Look at the followers of Christ. Their power was due to their ardour and their deeds. Every effort must have its result, else it is not a true effort. You must become the means of lighting the world of humanity. This is the infallible proof and sign. Every progress depends on two things, knowledge and practice. First acquire knowledge, and, when conviction is reached, put it into practice.
“Once a learned man journeyed to see me to receive my blessing, saying he knew and comprehended the Bahá’í teachings. When I told him that he could receive the blessings of the Holy Spirit at any time when he put himself in a receptive attitude to accept them, he said he was always in a receptive attitude.
“‘What would you do,’ I asked ‘if I were to suddenly turn and strike you?’ He instantly flared with indignation and strode angrily about the room.
“After a little I went over and took his arm, saying, ‘But you must return good for evil. Whether I honoured you or despised you, you should follow the teachings; now you merely read them. Remember the words of Jesus who said, ‘The first shall be last, and the last first.’ The man turned, shook my hand and departed, and I have since heard of many kind acts he has done.” When ‘Abdu’l-Bahá was addressed by the name of prophet, he answered, “My name is ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, the Servant of God” [literally, the Slave of Glory.][1]
[1]Compare:—“My Name is ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. My Reality is ‘Abdu’l-Bahá: and Service to all the human race is my perpetual Religion.... ‘Abdu’l-Bahá is the Banner of the Most Great Peace ...The Herald of the Kingdom is he, so that he may awaken the people of the East and the West. The Voice of Friendship, of Truth, and of Reconciliation is he, quickening all regions. No name, no title will he ever have, except ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. This is my longing. This is my Supreme height. O ye friends of God! ‘Abdu’l-Bahá is the manifestation of Service, and not Christ. The Servant of humanity is he, and not a chief. Summon ye the people to the station of Service of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and not his Christhood.” (From a letter sent to the friends in New York, January 1st, 1907.)
 
Old 05-03-2013, 06:08 PM   #20
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In New York City a young supporter of tax-reform asked, "What message shall I take to my friends?" The Master laughed with delighted humour: "Tell them to come into the Kingdom of God. There they will find plenty of land - and there are no taxes on it!"

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 155)
 
Old 05-03-2013, 09:01 PM   #21
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Thx Bill! Keep 'em coming. . .
 
Old 05-04-2013, 03:42 PM   #22
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Before a winter's cold took hold of Akká, the Master would go to a clothing shop where He would arrange that a number of the poor would should come to receive their annual cloaks. He would adjust the garments over some of those poor shoulders. He gave where He felt it was merited and kept a record of the recipients. He did not wish to be abused - but even abuse was known to receive kindness at His generous hands, as has been shown. (50) Small wonder that the Arabs called Him the 'Lord of Generosity' (51) and Baha'is became ablaze by observing His actions of continuing kindness and loved Him as the Servant of God.
(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 65)
 
Old 05-05-2013, 05:07 PM   #23
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At Wandsworth Prison the Master, Abdul-Baha, wrote in the visitors book: 'The greatest prison is the prison of self.'

When people said to Abdul-Baha how happy they were that He was free, He replied:
'Freedom is not a matter of place, but of condition. I was happy in that prison, for those days were passed in the path of service.
'To me prison was freedom.
'Troubles are a rest to me.
'Death is life.
'To be despised is honour.
(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 9)
 
Old 05-06-2013, 04:28 PM   #24
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Abdul-Baha's family were taught to dress in such a way that they would be 'an example to the rich and an encouragement to the poor'. Available money was stretched to cover far more than the Master's family needs. One of His daughters wore no bridal gown when she married - a clean dress sufficed. The Master was queried why He had not provided bridal clothes. With candour He replied simply, 'My daughter is warmly clad and has all that she needs for comfort. The poor have not. What my daughter does not need I will give to the poor rather than to her.'

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 24)
 
Old 05-06-2013, 04:40 PM   #25
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Florence Khánum relates two sayings she heard from Abdul-Baha. On one occasion He said to her"Sabr kun; mithl-i-Man básh" - be patient, be as I am. The other was when some one expressed discouragement to Him, saying they could not possibly acquire all the qualities and virtues that Baha'is are directed to possess, and the Master replied, " Kam Kam, Rúz bih rúz" - little by little; day by day.
(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 27)
 
Old 05-11-2013, 10:22 AM   #26
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Stanwood Cobb recorded that 'the most important interview' he had with the Master was while in Paris in 1913. He wrote, 'I was one of the staff of Porter Sargent's Travel School for Boys. On my first visit He inquired about the school and asked me what we taught. I told Him that I taught English, Latin, Algebra and Geometry. He gazed intently at me with His luminous eye's and said, "Do you teach the spiritual things?"

This question embarrassed me. I did not know how to explain to Abdul-Baha that the necessity of preparing the boys for college-entrance exams dominated the nature of the curriculum. So I simply answered: "No, there is no time for that."

Abdul-Baha made no comment on this answer. But He did not have to. Out of my own mouth I had condemned myself and modern education. No time for spiritual things! That of course, is just what is wrong with our modern materialistic "civilization". It has no time to give for spiritual things.

But Abdul-Baha's question and His silent response indicated that from His viewpoint spiritual things should come first.

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 122)
 
Old 05-11-2013, 10:02 PM   #27
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Stanwood Cobb

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
Stanwood Cobb recorded that 'the most important interview' he had with the Master was while in Paris in 1913. He wrote, 'I was one of the staff of Porter Sargent's Travel School for Boys. On my first visit He inquired about the school and asked me what we taught. I told Him that I taught English, Latin, Algebra and Geometry. He gazed intently at me with His luminous eye's and said, "Do you teach the spiritual things?"

This question embarrassed me. I did not know how to explain to Abdul-Baha that the necessity of preparing the boys for college-entrance exams dominated the nature of the curriculum. So I simply answered: "No, there is no time for that."

Abdul-Baha made no comment on this answer. But He did not have to. Out of my own mouth I had condemned myself and modern education. No time for spiritual things! That of course, is just what is wrong with our modern materialistic "civilization". It has no time to give for spiritual things.

But Abdul-Baha's question and His silent response indicated that from His viewpoint spiritual things should come first.

(Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 122)
Bill,
I attended his funeral in 1982 in Washington DC when I was living there, as a new Baha'i.
 
Old 05-12-2013, 08:44 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by dale ramsdell View Post
Bill,
I attended his funeral in 1982 in Washington DC when I was living there, as a new Baha'i.
Interesting my friend.

He must have been a wonderful man.
 
Old 05-13-2013, 04:29 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceDLimber View Post

And indeed, the colonel's photograph (in full dress uniform) was published in a Baha'i book (Door of Hope, by David Ruhe).

That same portrait now hangs in Mazra'ieh directly across from the picture of one of the great enemies of the Faith, as I understand it so that the face in the enemy's picture can "stare" across at the Baha'i colonel and remember his own error.

And I have the bounty of knowing the fifth- and sixth-generation descendants of the colonel, who were in my community and still live near me! :-)

Peace, :-)

Bruce
That's funny!
 
Old 05-13-2013, 04:36 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
"'Abdu'l-Baha's kind heart went out to those who were ill. If He could alleviate a pain or discomfort, he set about to do so. We are told that one old couple who were ill in bed for a month had twenty visits from the Master during that time in Akka. He daily sent a servant to inquire about the welfare of the ill, and as there was no hospital in town, He paid a doctor a regular salary to look after the poor. The doctor was instructed not to tell Who provided this service. When a poor and crippled woman was shunned on contracting measles, the Master, on being informed, 'immediately engaged a woman to care for her; took a room, put comfortable bedding (His own) into it, called the doctor, sent food and everything she needed. He went to see that she had every attention, and when she died in peace and comfort, He it was Who arranged her simple funeral, paying all charges.'" (Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p. 43-4)
How much money did Abdu'l-Baha make during this time? I remember reading he made rugs in prison as a source of income. I'm wondering how much he saved for himself and how much he gave to others.
 
Old 05-13-2013, 05:31 AM   #31
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Quote:
Abdul-Baha made no comment on this answer. But He did not have to. Out of my own mouth I had condemned myself and modern education. No time for spiritual things! That of course, is just what is wrong with our modern materialistic "civilization". It has no time to give for spiritual things.
Triple underline this!

Bill, I think this just might be my favorite thread on the board. Can't wait for the next part. . .

Last edited by light upon light; 05-13-2013 at 05:33 AM.
 
Old 05-18-2013, 06:03 PM   #32
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Bahíyyih Randall was only thirteen years old when she went to Haifa to see the Master. She recalled that 'there was a perfectly wonderful person who always sat on the right of Abdul-Baha at dinner. His name was Haydar-Ali and he had been a follower of Baha'u'llah and was so meek and so beautiful. His hands would shake so that he could not eat. He was such an old,old man, and Abdul-Baha would feed him with such tenderness. One day I saw him sitting out in the garden and I asked him what he had ever done. Of course, he could not speak English and I could not speak Persian, but we somehow seemed to understand. A man came along to interpret just then, and told him what I had asked: 'What have you done to serve the Faith?'
Haydar-Ali looked up with his eyes to heaven and said, "I have not done as much as an ant could do in the path of God." Then the interpreter told me that he had been dragged across the desert, tied in a bag on a camel, and that his whole life had been one series of martyrdoms - yet he had said, "I have not done as much as an ant could do in the path of God!"

( Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p.82-83)
 
Old 05-18-2013, 06:09 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahanu View Post
How much money did Abdu'l-Baha make during this time? I remember reading he made rugs in prison as a source of income. I'm wondering how much he saved for himself and how much he gave to others.
My dear friend, who would know how much he would have made from such an enterprise, but the size of the family and visitors he had to feed would have required a large amount. So I do not think he would have saved much for himself, was he not always giving to others? No I do not believe he made much for himself as you ask.
 
Old 05-18-2013, 06:25 PM   #34
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Many American women believed that their equal rights had been promised them in 1776, and that by the words “All men are created equal,” the nation’s founders surely meant humankind, including women.

Seventy years later, in 1848, 100 delegates to the historic 1848 Women’s Rights Convention—68 women and 32 men—signed a declaration of sentiments declaring women as equal to men.

At the dawn of the 20th century, women were still widely considered as weak, childlike creatures needing a man’s protection. In the first decade of the new century, indignant female activists took to the streets, weary of waiting for what they considered to be the single basic right of an American citizen—the right to vote. The suffrage movement called for passage of a Constitutional amendment introduced into Congress more than three decades earlier. Militant suffragists marched in parades, held silent vigils, and went on hunger strikes. Often supporters met fierce resistance. Opponents heckled, jailed, and physically abused them.

This foment was ongoing in the U.S. and England during ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s visits. He commented on it in an address in Boston, saying “Demonstrations of force… are neither becoming nor effective in the cause of womanhood and equality.” He pointed out that “When men own the equality of women, there will be no need from them to struggle for their rights!”
 
Old 05-18-2013, 06:29 PM   #35
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Education of Women and Girls

In 1912, only about a third of college students were women, and they were not expected to contribute to society in the same ways as men. ‘Abdu’l-Bahá not only advocated that “Daughters and sons must follow the same curriculum of study,” but went a step further:

“…the education of women is of greater importance than the education of men, for they are the mothers of the race, and mothers rear the children. The first teachers of children are the mothers. Therefore, they must be capably trained in order to educate both sons and daughters.”

Women and Peace

‘Abdu’l-Bahá also frequently linked the advancement of women with the cause of international peace, and met with some of the women who were most active in the peace movements of the day, including such well-known figures as Jane Addams and Sarah Farmer.
Abdul-Baha in America 1912
 
Old 05-18-2013, 06:43 PM   #36
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Mirza Haydar Ali

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
Bahíyyih Randall was only thirteen years old when she went to Haifa to see the Master. She recalled that 'there was a perfectly wonderful person who always sat on the right of Abdul-Baha at dinner. His name was Haydar-Ali and he had been a follower of Baha'u'llah and was so meek and so beautiful. His hands would shake so that he could not eat. He was such an old,old man, and Abdul-Baha would feed him with such tenderness. One day I saw him sitting out in the garden and I asked him what he had ever done. Of course, he could not speak English and I could not speak Persian, but we somehow seemed to understand. A man came along to interpret just then, and told him what I had asked: 'What have you done to serve the Faith?'
Haydar-Ali looked up with his eyes to heaven and said, "I have not done as much as an ant could do in the path of God." Then the interpreter told me that he had been dragged across the desert, tied in a bag on a camel, and that his whole life had been one series of martyrdoms - yet he had said, "I have not done as much as an ant could do in the path of God!"

( Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p.82-83)
Mirza Haydar Ali was the greatest, the humblest, the truest servant of this Faith. (Although you could say that about a few others... ;-)
I once had a book of his stories. I forget the name. It was a treasure chest full of wisdom and simplicity, dedication and sacrifice.

"I crossed the desert on a camel with no name.
It felt good to get out of the sand...
La La La La La La La La
La La La La La ...
 
Old 05-19-2013, 03:51 PM   #37
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It is told that in the house of Abdul-Baha there was a beautiful rug upon which He used to sit. One day a poor Arab brought a load of wood to the house. He saw the rug and was very much attracted by its beauty. He handled it with great appreciation and exclaimed, "Oh, how wonderful it must be to have such a splendid rug to sit upon!"
Abdul-Baha heard him and said, "If you like the rug, take it."
The man could not believe it was really a gift. Fearing he would lose it, he put it over his his shoulder and began to run, looking back to see if anyone was coming to take it from him.
With delicious humour Abdel-Baha said, "Go on, no one is going to take it away from you."

( Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p.59)
 
Old 05-19-2013, 11:14 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkeyBill View Post
It is told that in the house of Abdul-Baha there was a beautiful rug upon which He used to sit. One day a poor Arab brought a load of wood to the house. He saw the rug and was very much attracted by its beauty. He handled it with great appreciation and exclaimed, "Oh, how wonderful it must be to have such a splendid rug to sit upon!"
Abdul-Baha heard him and said, "If you like the rug, take it."
The man could not believe it was really a gift. Fearing he would lose it, he put it over his his shoulder and began to run, looking back to see if anyone was coming to take it from him.
With delicious humour Abdel-Baha said, "Go on, no one is going to take it away from you."

( Honnold, Vignettes from the Life of 'Abdu'l-Baha, p.59)
Keep them coming BlinkeyBill - They are so heartwarming and well, the Perfect example

Regards Tony
 
Old 05-20-2013, 08:29 PM   #39
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nice thoughts, i love such types of didactic stories. Thanks for sharing such thoughts
 
Old 05-20-2013, 08:31 PM   #40
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thanks for sharing such thoughts, i love such didactic stories. One i like most is, a person used public carrier except of private and help the fisherwomen.


If all we thought like that then there will be satisfaction and a bful world would emerge
 
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