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Old 10-04-2017, 05:42 AM   #1
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MysticMonist's Avatar
 
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From: USA
Posts: 53
Plato's persecuted just person and Bahá'u'llá

I came across a passage in Plato that immediately made me think of Bahá'u'llá as well as other persecuted figures like Jesus and Job.

Plato in the Republic (Book 2) describes the just person treated as if he were unjust.
“They will tell you that the just man who is thought unjust will be scourged, racked, bound–will have his eyes burnt out; and, at last, after suffering every kind of evil, he will be impaled”

In contrast a unjust person who hides behind an illusion of being just.
“In the first place, he is thought just, and therefore bears rule in the city; he can marry whom he will, and give in marriage to whom he will; also he can trade and deal where he likes, and always to his own advantage, because he has no misgivings about injustice; and at every contest, whether in public or private, he gets the better of his antagonists, and gains at their expense, and is rich, and out of his gains he can benefit his friends, and harm his enemies; moreover, he can offer sacrifices, and dedicate gifts to the gods abundantly and magnificently, and can honour the gods or any man whom he wants to honour in a far better style than the just”

Plato's point it's easy to act virtuously when you are praised and rewarded by others. It takes much greater strength of character it takes to be virtuous when it earns only persecution. Bahá'u'llá went from exile to exile and was accused of all sorts of sins against God and man. Yet he persisted in his virtue.

What do you all think?
 
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Old 10-04-2017, 06:36 AM   #2
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Joined: Jul 2017
From: Kettering, Ohio USA
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticMonist View Post
I came across a passage in Plato that immediately made me think of Bahá'u'llá as well as other persecuted figures like Jesus and Job.

Plato in the Republic (Book 2) describes the just person treated as if he were unjust.
“They will tell you that the just man who is thought unjust will be scourged, racked, bound–will have his eyes burnt out; and, at last, after suffering every kind of evil, he will be impaled”

In contrast a unjust person who hides behind an illusion of being just.
“In the first place, he is thought just, and therefore bears rule in the city; he can marry whom he will, and give in marriage to whom he will; also he can trade and deal where he likes, and always to his own advantage, because he has no misgivings about injustice; and at every contest, whether in public or private, he gets the better of his antagonists, and gains at their expense, and is rich, and out of his gains he can benefit his friends, and harm his enemies; moreover, he can offer sacrifices, and dedicate gifts to the gods abundantly and magnificently, and can honour the gods or any man whom he wants to honour in a far better style than the just”

Plato's point it's easy to act virtuously when you are praised and rewarded by others. It takes much greater strength of character it takes to be virtuous when it earns only persecution. Bahá'u'llá went from exile to exile and was accused of all sorts of sins against God and man. Yet he persisted in his virtue.

What do you all think?
I think you're on to something.
 
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