Allah-u-Abha

Jul 2014
832
colorado/summer-Oklahoma/winter
#1
I have been thinking about this for a few months now, so thought I would bring it to the forum. When you pray your 95 repetitions of God the All Glorious, Allah-u-Abha, do you recite it in your native language? I have discussed this with a few friends, and we haven't been able to come to a conclusion. Only 1 friend, a third generation Baha'i, felt that it shouldn't be said in your native language. It came to me once after praying, that maybe I should be using my native language, that maybe it would have a greater effect on my area. And I did my 95 repetitions in English for about a month, but then I wondered if I should. I figure someone must have wondered this before me......

Loving regards,
Becky
 
Sep 2017
343
Earth
#2
-

Hi Becky Alláh’u’Abhá. Great question I have absolutely thought of this before but I was under the assumption that it must be said in Arabic .. But I can't remember where I had heard it I will look into it further and be back on this thread but I'm intrigued to hear what others have to say.
 
Sep 2010
4,437
Normanton Far North Queensland
#3
I have been thinking about this for a few months now, so thought I would bring it to the forum. When you pray your 95 repetitions of God the All Glorious, Allah-u-Abha, do you recite it in your native language? I have discussed this with a few friends, and we haven't been able to come to a conclusion. Only 1 friend, a third generation Baha'i, felt that it shouldn't be said in your native language. It came to me once after praying, that maybe I should be using my native language, that maybe it would have a greater effect on my area. And I did my 95 repetitions in English for about a month, but then I wondered if I should. I figure someone must have wondered this before me......

Loving regards,
Becky
Saying it as Allah'u'abha I would say.

It is also used as the Greeting in the same way.

Regards Tony
 
Oct 2017
45
Zanesville, Ohio
#5
Becky,

Your question becomes a deepening among the believers.

The two Semitic languages of Hebrew and Arabic are considered as holy languages, as having been the source of the Old Testament and the Quran. This promotes the concept that the spoken Word must be sanctified by one of the two.

In Christianity, was not the Word first spoken in Aramaic? Do Christians only use Aramaic in their services? If one memorized the Lord's Prayer from the King James Version of the Holy Bible, does this mean that the English language is ineffectual when in prayer?

Likewise, as the Baha'i Sacred Scriptures are divided between Arabic and Persian, by the Central Figures of the Faith, are both not sacred?

In the Kitab-i-Aqdas, (pg. 22) by Baha'u'llah (translated for English speaking Baha'is) concerning Ablutions, if clean water is not available, it says to repeat five times "In the Name of God the Most Pure, the Most Pure". Does this mean it is not kosher if not spoken as Allah-u-Athar (as given us by the Bab)?

Add unto this, He says to intone our prayers in a melodious fashion. Should everyone, without regard to their inability to sing on key, chant as do the Persian believers?

Each of us must discern for their self. It is a part of spiritual growth, understanding, and deepening in the Faith of God.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2010
4,437
Normanton Far North Queensland
#6
Becky,

Your question becomes a deepening among the believers.

The two Semitic languages of Hebrew and Arabic are considered as holy languages, as having been the source of the Old Testament and the Quran. This promotes the concept that the spoken Word must be sanctified by one of the two.

In Christianity, was not the Word first spoken in Aramaic? Do Christians only use Aramaic in their services? If one memorized the Lord's Prayer from the King James Version of the Holy Bible, does this mean that the English language is ineffectual when in prayer?

Likewise, as the Baha'i Sacred Scriptures are divided between Arabic and Persian, by the Central Figures of the Faith, are both not sacred?

In the Kitab-i-Aqdas, (pg. 22) by Baha'u'llah (translated for English speaking Baha'is) concerning Ablutions, if clean water is not available, it says to repeat five times "In the Name of God the Most Pure, the Most Pure". Does this mean it is not kosher if not spoken as Allah-u-Athar (as given us by the Bab)?

Add unto this, He says to intone our prayers in a melodious fashion. Should everyone, without regard to their inability to sing on key, chant as do the Persian believers?

Each of us must discern for their self. It is a part of spiritual growth, understanding, and deepening in the Faith of God.

With those thoughts this may be of interest;

A Million Ways to Intone Your Prayer

Regards Tony
 
Oct 2017
45
Zanesville, Ohio
#7
Tony,

Sitting in a small private fireside with Mrs. Khadem, the question was raised concerning the Persians asked to chant prayers at a feast.

It was obvious to those present, each had a wonderful voice. It was also revealed, as is the custom, a Persian maiden must be asked three times, with her compliance, should she be in agreement, after the third request.

Then, regarding the chant, it was confirmed by her that it is most often impromptu. Further questions and she agreed, it is much like original jazz compositions, in the moment and from the heart.

It is through intoning, in a melodious fashion, that many discover it is easier to memorize a specific Writing, or prayer. Mine own is used in times of difficulty and during the noon day prayer, much like one would use a mantra.

In my private times of communing with Him, all is done in melodious readings. In this the mood is set (as in mystic circles, recognized as "a place"), that meditation may become a time of receiving a thought, a "thing". [ A mystical axiom = A mood is a place and a thought is a thing ]

Some may experience a thought as an inspiration, or enlightenment. The experience can expand ones own capacity, even unto other worlds of consciousness (see Writings for "worlds of consciousness).

-Zo-
 
Jun 2014
1,044
Wisconsin
#8
I don't think there'd be any specific problem with saying it any language. Though I think it sounds easier to chant as "Allah-u-Abha" than it does as 'God the All-Glorious".

Though it gets me thinking... if the language is not all that important, maybe make it into a sort of "World Unity" chant. Maybe state the name in five different languages in 19 repetitions for the total of 95. or 19 languages in five repetitions if you can find that many translations.
 
Jul 2014
832
colorado/summer-Oklahoma/winter
#9
Thank you everybody for giving this question your consideration. I had felt compelled to recite God the All Glorious for some reason, out of the blue, just felt very urgent about it. As Walrus said, it is easier and faster to say Allah'u'Abha, but maybe I am supposed to take more time. So perhaps, my resolution will be to alternate languages. Thank you for all your help!
Loving regards,
Becky
 
Aug 2010
724
New Zealand mainly
#10
Because the original begins with Ya, it is a vocative, so rather than reciting "God, the all-glorious" why not try "All Glorious God!" / "Most Glorious God" / "O God, the all-glorious." Each of these is a translation that is clearly vocative.
 

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