Baha’is and climate change

Jan 2012
719
China
#1
My only reason for discussing climate change with other Baha’is would be for our possible common ground in loving and trusting Baha’u’llah, Abdu’l-Baha, Shoghi Effendi and/or the House of Justice. Is there anyone here who is interested in discussing what to do about climate change, in that context?

I’ll repeat what I said in another thread. One possibility I see is for each of us to describe what we’re doing and hoping to do, and each try to understand what the others are doing, just to understand it and not to argue against it or poke holes in it. If anyone wants to try to persuade me to do anything different, I would first need to see that they have thoughtfully studied all the statements about it from the BIC, and the UN sustainable development goals.

If anyone has any other ideas about how to have a discussion on climate change grounded in trusting and following one or more of our central figures and/or the House of Justice, I would be glad to see them.
 
Sep 2010
4,511
Normanton Far North Queensland
#2
Personally I see that the health of the mind of humanity ties into climate change and I do not see the mind of man is very healthy at this time.

So what are we doing about it? Personally I am trying to create a healthy mind and also assist my family to do the same. If we acheive that, we may be able to help to others?

Regards Tony
 
Likes: jimhabegger
May 2019
1
idaho
#3
Hello, I am new to the forum and would also like to discuss climate change. I have read
Deep Adaptation: A Map for Navigating ClimateTragedy
IFLAS Occasional Paper 2 www.iflas.info
July 27th 20181
Professor Jem Bendell BA (Hons) PhD
I frequently read the UHJ April 27th 2017 letter, as I need constant guidance and prayer so as not to become more “militant” in light of the future, our divinely gifted planet and its people, now face. Yet I have great faith in humanity’s adaptability and problem solving skills, (historical perspective). For my own part I am doing everything I can to reduce my personal carbon footprint. I buy very little new. Everything I wear is second hand. As are furnishings, kitchen supplies, etc. I live in an area with an abundance of second hand stores. They will also take my used goods. I use a sewing machine to repair clothes and undergarments. I plant a small garden and compost waste. I reuse waste water whenever possible. I am retired, but have quite a few volunteer activities in my community. So I am pleasantly surprised at how easy it has been to make this shift, and enjoyable. Reducing plastic is a real challenge. So I would love input on that. It can make grocery shopping a challenge, at times. I have found making these changes to be a good source of education for myself and others. From my perspective corporate change will be the only change that has an immediate impact. In the U.S.? I’m not holding my breath for that. Thanks for addressing this topic.
 
Likes: jimhabegger
Jan 2012
719
China
#5
Mostly what I'm doing about climate change, and all other current issues, is trying to help with the growth and spread of the kind of community building that the House of Justice is promoting. I'll say more about that in the thread about Baha'i response to what the world needs according to the House of Justice.