Becoming Spiritual with metaphors of hedonism (wine, sex & beautiful maiden)

#12
Anyways. What youth doesn't experience some kind of apprehension at fear of NOT attaining (or attaining) Romantic Union (as a beloved husband and wife does with each other) in a true chaste Bahai Marriage? IMHO there is a certain kind of way to trick the mind away from being unchaste in the midst of loneliness in A LOT of Bahai writings telling us forget our lives for spiritual ecstacy, be patient, and take a certain amount of pain of facing our enemies and adversaries we ever experience true loving Union. The Seven Valleys seems to suggest this very vividly:

At last, the tree of his longing yielded the fruit of despair, and the fire of his hope fell to ashes. Then one night he could live no more, and he went out of his house and made for the marketplace. On a sudden, a watchman followed 14 after him. He broke into a run, with the watchman following; then other watchmen came together, and barred every passage to the weary one. And the wretched one cried from his heart, and ran here and there, and moaned to himself: "Surely this watchman is Izra'il, my angel of death, following so fast upon me; or he is a tyrant of men, seeking to harm me." His feet carried him on, the one bleeding with the arrow of love, and his heart lamented. Then he came to a garden wall, and with untold pain he scaled it, for it proved very high; and forgetting his life, he threw himself down to the garden.

And there he beheld his beloved with a lamp in her hand, searching for a ring she had lost. When the heart-surrendered lover looked on his ravishing love, he drew a great breath and raised up his hands in prayer, crying: "O God! Give Thou glory to the watchman, and riches and long life. For the watchman was Gabriel, guiding this poor one; or he was Israfil, bringing life to this wretched one!"

(Baha'u'llah, The Seven Valleys, p. 13)
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Jun 2014
1,024
Wisconsin
#13
My first thought: Have you ever read Song of Songs?? It's the book of the Bible wherein Solomon declares and describes his love for God in a very sexualized context. It's a weird read, given that you don't often see something like that, but fascinating in its symbolic dimension.

My next thoughts: Hedonistic metaphor for the spiritual is a good and necessary thing. Like how Jesus spent his time among the lost and those in darkness, you want to be able to speak to those who need these teachings the most. In other words, you want to communicate your message of detachment and spirituality to those who practice hedonism and materialism, those are the people who need detachment and spirituality the most, after all.

And to communicate to those people, what better way to describe things but with hedonistic and materialistic metaphor?? Speaking in a language they would understand and be able to process.
 
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#14
My first thought: Have you ever read Song of Songs?? It's the book of the Bible wherein Solomon declares and describes his love for God in a very sexualized context. It's a weird read, given that you don't often see something like that, but fascinating in its symbolic dimension.
No I haven't. Solomon was the son of David who defeated the Giant Goliath built a Great Temple had almost 1,000 wives many of whom were mind controlled sex slaves & spoils of war (if you really think what a kingdom entails without the balance of a queen in monogomous union) is still venerated and today in the Occult world especially Free Masonry. His kingdom fell apart shortly after he died. He was the bane of the Jews ever since. Abdul Baha says somewhere Israel fell into discord after Solomon's reign of terror.
 
Jul 2017
238
Kettering, Ohio USA
#15
No I haven't. Solomon was the son of David who defeated the Giant Goliath built a Great Temple had almost 1,000 wives many of whom were mind controlled sex slaves & spoils of war (if you really think what a kingdom entails without the balance of a queen in monogomous union) is still venerated and today in the Occult world especially Free Masonry. His kingdom fell apart shortly after he died. He was the bane of the Jews ever since. Abdul Baha says somewhere Israel fell into discord after Solomon's reign of terror.
Solomon didn't have a reign of terror. Read the Bible.
 
#16
Solomon didn't have a reign of terror. Read the Bible.
Okay so I'm gonna get around to fetching & pasting that Ocean Software's search results for "SOLOMON" where Abdu'l-Baha essentially says spiritual Judaism's peak was with tyrant Solomon and if you are so determined to contradict me. Why are you hesitating to show some kind of quote to support otherwise? Are you even the least bit of a Bahai advocate or apologist? Or Are you somekind of weird Talmudic jew following crap that according to Bahais is either fraud or rendered obsolete a long time ago?
 
#17
I guess why I brought up this old last jewish King with any semblence of an advanced civiliation for those ancient times is he was an elitist and a hedonist and in a sense corrupted. Good article here why: https://www.gotquestions.org/Solomon-wives-concubines.html If you want to discuss King Solomon some with me some more please start another thread.
In brief, Moses -- upon Whom be peace! -- founded the law of God, purified the morals of the people of Israel and gave them an impetus toward nobler and higher attainments. But after the departure of Moses, following the decline of the glory of Solomon's era and during the reign of Jeroboam there came a great change in this nation. The high ethical standards and spiritual perfections ceased to exist. Conditions and morals became corrupt, religion was debased, and the perfect principles of the Mosaic law were obscured in superstition and polytheism. War and strife arose among the tribes, and their unity was destroyed. The followers of Jeroboam declared themselves rightful and valid in kingly succession, and the supporters of Rehoboam made the same claim. Finally, the tribes were torn asunder by hostility and hatred, the glory of Israel was eclipsed, and so complete was the degradation 407 that a golden calf was set up as an object of worship in the city of Tyre. Thereupon God sent Elijah, the prophet, who redeemed the people, renewed the law of God and established an era of new life for Israel. History shows a still later change and transformation when this oneness and solidarity were followed by another dispersion of the tribes. Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, invaded the Holy Land and carried away captive seventy thousand Israelites to Chaldea, where the greatest reverses, trials and suffering afflicted these unfortunate people. Then the prophets of God again reformed and reestablished the law of God, and the people in their humiliation again followed it. This resulted in their liberation, and under the edict of Cyrus, King of Persia, there was a return to the Holy City. Jerusalem and the Temple of Solomon were rebuilt, and the glory of Israel was restored. This lasted but a short time; the morality of the people declined, and conditions reached an extreme degree until the Roman general Titus took Jerusalem and razed it to its foundations. Pillage and conquest completed the desolation; Palestine became a waste and wilderness, and the Jews fled from the Holy Land of their ancestors. The cause of this disintegration and dispersion was the departure of Israel from the foundation of the law of God revealed by Moses -- namely, the acquisition of divine virtues, morality, love, the development of arts and sciences and the spirit of the oneness of humanity

(Abdu'l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 406)
 
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Jun 2014
1,024
Wisconsin
#18
I guess why I brought up this old last jewish King with any semblence of an advanced civiliation for those ancient times is he was an elitist and a hedonist and in a sense corrupted. Good article here why: https://www.gotquestions.org/Solomon-wives-concubines.html If you want to discuss King Solomon some with me some more please start another thread.
I can't tell if you're serious.

You say 'Abdu'l-Baha said Solomon was a tyrant, and then quote a passage of him describing the tyranny of Jeroboam to support your claim.

Did you misread that verse in earnest, or are you willfully misquoting things to support your assertions??
 
#19
I can't tell if you're serious.

You say 'Abdu'l-Baha said Solomon was a tyrant, and then quote a passage of him describing the tyranny of Jeroboam to support your claim.

Did you misread that verse in earnest, or are you willfully misquoting things to support your assertions??
I'm saying the seeds of Solomon's Kingdom going to crap after he died were inherent in his corrupt methods of keeping power
which only lasted during his lifetime and fell to pieces shortly after.
 
Jun 2014
1,024
Wisconsin
#20
I'm saying the seeds of Solomon's Kingdom going to crap after he died were inherent in his corrupt methods of keeping power
which only lasted during his lifetime and fell to pieces shortly after.
So when you wrote "where Abdu'l-Baha essentially says spiritual Judaism's peak was with tyrant Solomon", you're essentially just putting words in Abdu'l-Baha's mouth. Got it.
 

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