Bridging The Gap Between Religion And Mental Illness

Jul 2011
1,747
n ireland
#62
I forget the details, memory has become unreliable due to illness and meds,the BBC has done an article on middle-aged men alone this Christmas. Apparently there are several thousands in UK. Understandably many people are aware of the lonely elderly at this time. Everyone, I think assumes that this time of year doesn't impact upon male adults:confused:
 
Oct 2011
4,213
Quilimari,Chile
#63
I forget the details, memory has become unreliable due to illness and meds,the BBC has done an article on middle-aged men alone this Christmas. Apparently there are several thousands in UK. Understandably many people are aware of the lonely elderly at this time. Everyone, I think assumes that this time of year doesn't impact upon male adults:confused:
Sadly with many marriage breakdowns, there are more people in lonely situations.
Woman have far more assistance than men, with self help groups and also Government institutions.
But men are learning and now there is slowly more self help groups being formed, also some churches offer assistance at this time. Something I feel that Local Spiritual Assemblies need to consider.

I still remember one Christmas after being told to leave my house and my marriage, because I was ill with my CFS and no other reason, my daughter the last one who had, I felt a loving relationship with, told me that she would spend the day with my wife as she had already accepted the invitation, I still remember my shock and hurt, that she did not take into account what had been done to me, and my daughter apparently did not understand the hurt and lonliness that she was inflicting, upon one now suffering a severe illness, rejection from the woman I had loved, and now I was to be deprived of my daughter and two granddaughters. Yes that was many years ago, but the pain of that day still lingers.

So dear aidan I have empathy of what you speak about.
So dear friend check your e-mail box I will be writing to you, because of distance sadly I can't come and visit.

Loving regards
bill
 
Aug 2015
380
Europe
#64
How could one even imagine such a thing as people who might have behaved in a sane way before, when meeting the Faith, demonstrating passive-aggressive, narcissistic, psychopathic behaviour as a defence against this absolutely incomprehensible reality?
... or it's just your interpretation that this is what happens.

I've been around for a while and I've noticed that many religious people, from different denominations, have two things in common:
1. They negatively stigmatize anyone who doesn't submit to their religion.
2. They are blind to the fact that all kinds of religious people want other people to join their particular religion.

For someone who is not affiliated with any particular religion, the situation with different religions is like being pulled by a dozen people in different religions, and they're all saying the same thing ("Follow me, I am right, and all the others are wrong!"), but each of them is pulling in a different direction.

In the face of this being pulled in all directions, if a person doesn't "demonstrate passive-aggressive, narcissistic, psychopathic behaviour" -- then such a person must be really really advanced, or catatonic.
 
Aug 2015
380
Europe
#65
How do we bridge a gap of understanding mental illness and reconciling it with our blessed faith.

Do we judge those among us who have illness of any kind, with love and understanding?
"Mental illness" according to whose definition of "mental illness"?
Western psychologists'?

Why subscribe to a religion, but then, in some areas of life, subscribe to the definitions made by people who less or more oppose said religion??
 
Sep 2010
4,436
Normanton Far North Queensland
#66
For someone who is not affiliated with any particular religion, the situation with different religions is like being pulled by a dozen people in different religions, and they're all saying the same thing ("Follow me, I am right, and all the others are wrong!"), but each of them is pulling in a different direction.
Then it must be refreshing when you find one that will tell you they all come from the same source and choose your own path and make up your own mind. :eek:

Of course this does not explain the complexities of such a statement

Regards Tony
 
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Oct 2014
1,786
Stockholm
#68
"Mental illness" according to whose definition of "mental illness"?
Western psychologists'?

Why subscribe to a religion, but then, in some areas of life, subscribe to the definitions made by people who less or more oppose said religion??
Dear Sophia,

As so often, you have a point there, and that theme could be elaborated on many pages. :)

gnat
 
Jul 2015
75
Berlin, Germany
#69
I had a psychosis 10 years ago that would have been diagnosed as schizophrenia, had it lasted longer. For these four weeks, my perception of reality was distorted, much like people might describe a bad LSD trip or such. It was NOT a matter of a false attitude, "bad mood". It was a false balance of brain chemistry and very real.

Fortunately, I got medication that quickly helped me. I've been taking it on a low dose since then, attempts at quitting it were not successful, but thanks to this medication, I can live a happy, "normal" life now.

It was this very experience that triggered my spiritual journey away from atheism.

I'd like to say it clearly here: Anyone who claims mental illness does not exist, or is just a matter of definition, is clearly either ignorant or totally lacking empathy here. Likewise, I cannot agree with anyone who dismisses the value of Western medicine when it comes to this topic.

There are serious forms of mental illness that are not any less real than a broken bone, and some which can just as well be addressed with standard material medicine -- though, needless to say, a purely materialistic life will be just as one-sided for a person with a mental illness, like for everybody else.

I'm sorry if I'm too direct saying this, but this topic is "close to home" for me. The world would certainly be a better place if more people had more empathy with people suffering from one form of mental illness or another.
 
Jul 2011
1,747
n ireland
#70
I had a psychosis 10 years ago that would have been diagnosed as schizophrenia, had it lasted longer. For these four weeks, my perception of reality was distorted, much like people might describe a bad LSD trip or such. It was NOT a matter of a false attitude, "bad mood". It was a false balance of brain chemistry and very real.

Fortunately, I got medication that quickly helped me. I've been taking it on a low dose since then, attempts at quitting it were not successful, but thanks to this medication, I can live a happy, "normal" life now.

It was this very experience that triggered my spiritual journey away from atheism.

I'd like to say it clearly here: Anyone who claims mental illness does not exist, or is just a matter of definition, is clearly either ignorant or totally lacking empathy here. Likewise, I cannot agree with anyone who dismisses the value of Western medicine when it comes to this topic.

There are serious forms of mental illness that are not any less real than a broken bone, and some which can just as well be addressed with standard material medicine -- though, needless to say, a purely materialistic life will be just as one-sided for a person with a mental illness, like for everybody else.

I'm sorry if I'm too direct saying this, but this topic is "close to home" for me. The world would certainly be a better place if more people had more empathy with people suffering from one form of mental illness or another.
I concur with Sebastian 100%. There's still so much societal ignorance re this difficult aspect of illness:yes: