Faith of Kemet (Ancient Egypt)

Mar 2019
27
Senegal
#1
The Hinduism threads got me inspired to return to the faith of Ancient Egypt. The term Amen/Amin could have origins in AUM of India, or Amun of Kemet, or maybe both. I think the following info may be of great interest... From the Wikipedia page on the Amun-Ra.

"Amun-Ra retained chief importance in the Egyptian pantheon throughout the New Kingdom. Amun-Ra in this period (16th to 11th centuries BC) held the position of transcendental, self-created, Creator deity "par excellence"; he was the champion of the poor or troubled and central to personal piety. His position as King of Gods developed to the point of virtual monotheism where other gods became manifestations of him"

And about Trinity...
"In the Leiden hymns, Amun, Ptah, and Re are regarded as a trinity who are distinct gods but with unity in plurality.

"All gods are three: Amun, Re and Ptah, whom none equals. He who hides his name as Amun, he appears to the face as Re, his body is Ptah."

About Ptah...
"Ptah is an Egyptian deity and considered the demiurge who existed before all other things and, by his will, thought the world into existence. It was first conceived by Thought, and realized by the Word: Ptah conceives the world by the thought of his heart and gives life through the magic of his Word"

Another is the Thebia Triad, Father - Mother - Son:
"The Theban Triad are three Egyptian gods that were the most popular in the area of Thebes, in Egypt. The group consisted of Amun, his consort Mut and their son Khonsu."

Khonsu is associated with the moon, and the moon reflects the Sun's light. His name means Traveler, and he is a Healer.
The Mother Mut is associated with the primordial waters that birthed the world.
 
Feb 2019
70
Chicago
#2
The Hinduism threads got me inspired to return to the faith of Ancient Egypt. The term Amen/Amin could have origins in AUM of India, or Amun of Kemet, or maybe both. I think the following info may be of great interest... From the Wikipedia page on the Amun-Ra.

"Amun-Ra retained chief importance in the Egyptian pantheon throughout the New Kingdom. Amun-Ra in this period (16th to 11th centuries BC) held the position of transcendental, self-created, Creator deity "par excellence"; he was the champion of the poor or troubled and central to personal piety. His position as King of Gods developed to the point of virtual monotheism where other gods became manifestations of him"

And about Trinity...
"In the Leiden hymns, Amun, Ptah, and Re are regarded as a trinity who are distinct gods but with unity in plurality.

"All gods are three: Amun, Re and Ptah, whom none equals. He who hides his name as Amun, he appears to the face as Re, his body is Ptah."

About Ptah...
"Ptah is an Egyptian deity and considered the demiurge who existed before all other things and, by his will, thought the world into existence. It was first conceived by Thought, and realized by the Word: Ptah conceives the world by the thought of his heart and gives life through the magic of his Word"

Another is the Thebia Triad, Father - Mother - Son:
"The Theban Triad are three Egyptian gods that were the most popular in the area of Thebes, in Egypt. The group consisted of Amun, his consort Mut and their son Khonsu."
.
Thanks for sharing. Amun, Re and Ptah correspond to Aum, Tat and Sat of Hinduism. That's quite interesting but not surprising given the links between India and Egypt in the ancient times.


The brightest evidence of India's
direct relations with Egypt is, however, preserved in the
Mauryan Emperor Ashok's thirteenth rock edict, inscribed in the
early decades of the third century B. C. In it, Ashoka
refers to his contacts with Ptolemy II Philadelphus of Egypt
(285-246 BC), in connection with the expansion of his policy of
the propagation of the Law of Righteousness (dharma). In the
Ashokan records of Ptolemy II is referred to as Turamaya. There
can be little doubts that official embassies were exchanged
between the Mauryan court and that of Ptolemy II. Pliny names
the Egyptian ambassador of Ptolemy II to India as Dionysius.

Ashoka, in his second rock edict, refers to the philanthropic activities undertaken by himself. He records that he had made arrangements for the medical treatment of men and animals in the territories of his own empire as well as in the region ruled by Antiochus Theos II of Syria (260-246 BC) and its neighboring kingdoms, which also included Egypt.

With the growth of India's links with the West, there was brisk communication in the area of trade with the Hellenistic world including Egypt, and it is believed that Indian traders reached the land of the Pharaohs. A Hellenistic writer, Agatharchides, the learned tutor of Ptolemy Soter II informs one about a colony of Indians on the island close to the mouth of the Red Sea, named Socotra, which in Sanskrit would be Sukhottara-dvipa (island of great joy). Socotra, must have functioned as one of many intermediary ports between Egypt and India.

Interestingly, it is stated that the Egyptian ruler Ptolemy IV, Philopator, lined a part of his yacht with Indian stones. The presence of Indians in Egypt in the third century BC has been attested by Athenaeus who observes that the processions of Ptolemy II Philadelphus also included women, cows, and hunting dogs from India.

Historians have long known that Egypt and India traded by land and sea during the Roman era, in part because of texts detailing the commercial exchange of luxury goods, including fabrics, spices and wine. Among their finds at the site near Egypt's border with Sudan: more than 16 pounds (7 kilograms) of black peppercorns, the largest stash of the prized Indian spice ever recovered from a Roman archaeological site.

Ships would sail between Berenike and India during the summer, when monsoon winds were strongest, Wendrich said. From Berenike, camel caravans probably carried the goods 240 miles (386 kilometers) west to the Nile, where they were shipped by boat to the Mediterranean port of Alexandria, she said. From there, they could have moved by ship through the rest of the Roman world. Mediterranean goods, including wine from the Greek island of Kos and fine tableware, moved in the opposite direction. This Indian cotton textile was excavated from a Roman trash dump in the ancient Egyptian town of Berenike. Local Ababda nomads dig in one of the streets in Berenike, which holds an array of artifacts that scientists say reveals an "impressive" sea trade between the Roman Empire and India.
 
Jun 2014
1,061
Wisconsin
#3
The Hinduism threads got me inspired to return to the faith of Ancient Egypt. The term Amen/Amin could have origins in AUM of India, or Amun of Kemet, or maybe both.
It's a word with Semitic origins, so Egyptian roots would be more likely than Indo-European roots.

The brightest evidence of India's
direct relations with Egypt is, however, preserved in the
Mauryan Emperor Ashok's thirteenth rock edict, inscribed in the
early decades of the third century B. C. In it, Ashoka
refers to his contacts with Ptolemy II Philadelphus of Egypt
(285-246 BC), in connection with the expansion of his policy of
the propagation of the Law of Righteousness (dharma). In the
Ashokan records of Ptolemy II is referred to as Turamaya. There
can be little doubts that official embassies were exchanged
between the Mauryan court and that of Ptolemy II. Pliny names
the Egyptian ambassador of Ptolemy II to India as Dionysius.

Ashoka, in his second rock edict, refers to the philanthropic activities undertaken by himself. He records that he had made arrangements for the medical treatment of men and animals in the territories of his own empire as well as in the region ruled by Antiochus Theos II of Syria (260-246 BC) and its neighboring kingdoms, which also included Egypt.

With the growth of India's links with the West, there was brisk communication in the area of trade with the Hellenistic world including Egypt, and it is believed that Indian traders reached the land of the Pharaohs. A Hellenistic writer, Agatharchides, the learned tutor of Ptolemy Soter II informs one about a colony of Indians on the island close to the mouth of the Red Sea, named Socotra, which in Sanskrit would be Sukhottara-dvipa (island of great joy). Socotra, must have functioned as one of many intermediary ports between Egypt and India.

Interestingly, it is stated that the Egyptian ruler Ptolemy IV, Philopator, lined a part of his yacht with Indian stones. The presence of Indians in Egypt in the third century BC has been attested by Athenaeus who observes that the processions of Ptolemy II Philadelphus also included women, cows, and hunting dogs from India.

Historians have long known that Egypt and India traded by land and sea during the Roman era, in part because of texts detailing the commercial exchange of luxury goods, including fabrics, spices and wine. Among their finds at the site near Egypt's border with Sudan: more than 16 pounds (7 kilograms) of black peppercorns, the largest stash of the prized Indian spice ever recovered from a Roman archaeological site.

Ships would sail between Berenike and India during the summer, when monsoon winds were strongest, Wendrich said. From Berenike, camel caravans probably carried the goods 240 miles (386 kilometers) west to the Nile, where they were shipped by boat to the Mediterranean port of Alexandria, she said. From there, they could have moved by ship through the rest of the Roman world. Mediterranean goods, including wine from the Greek island of Kos and fine tableware, moved in the opposite direction. This Indian cotton textile was excavated from a Roman trash dump in the ancient Egyptian town of Berenike. Local Ababda nomads dig in one of the streets in Berenike, which holds an array of artifacts that scientists say reveals an "impressive" sea trade between the Roman Empire and India.
I'm not so sure that this is evidence of religious influence of India onto Egypt. Every one of these examples of contact between Egypt and India are either from Ptolemaic or post-Ptolemaic Egypt, the Greek-Egyptian Dynasty which was the result of Alexander the Great's conquests which, of course, spanned to India and thus obviously connected the two cultures with one another.

But these Egyptian religious figures predate Alexander by quite a bit. I think we'd need evidence of pre-Hellenic contact to conclusively state that any Egyptian religious concept corresponds with any Dharmic one.

((That being said, the cultural exchange between the Hellenic world and India is quite fascinating. Buddha statues, for example, are the result of Greek colonists who converted to Buddhism bringing elements from the Hellenic religious statuary into their new faith. There's a ton of evidence of very interesting exchange between Greek and Indian cultures following Alexander's conquests... but I haven't seen much about pre-Hellenic Egyptian-Indian contact.))