Hello, everyone!

Oct 2019
32
Vrindavan
The greater question currently facing all humanity may be that of the unity of mankind, how we can reach that goal?
From my point of view we must learn to overcome the divisive differences, not only the unity of religion, because a unity of religions would mean to draw a separation to those who are not religious at the same time.

Our religious understanding must go so far that it no longer asks for religious people. The term religion is fundamentally doubtful. Originally it originated in the Christian Middle Ages and described the worship of the exclusively Trinitarian God. Over the centuries, the term was changed until even religious studies today no longer has a clear concept of religion.

If we no longer think in terms of religion, the question of one religion no longer arises. We should ask about people. There are studies that the moral questions originally did not belong to spirituality. Therefore moral questions do not have to be clarified out of spirituality. They can be conclusions from being human itself. Much more important is when we ask for people to think in this unity that people are always related to God or are part of God.

The Baha'i are approaching this at the community level, building strong communities in love of virtues and services to the community.
I can't really judge that. When I'm in the big cities in Germany. When we go to Baha'i meetings, we often talk about the smallest minority in terms of numbers. Accordingly, only a few people can be reached. That's why I don't know what the term "building strong communities" means.

Somewhat curious seems to me the idea of successive revelators. Baha'u'llah's message is much closer to the revelation of Jesus Christ than to the revelation of Mohammed. Nevertheless, in the Baha'i scriptures the Qur'an is described as more authentic. The Qur'an departs from the peaceful character of Christianity and is full of verses about war and struggle. In addition, there are many verses that draw a hostile line between believers and unbelievers. Why doesn't the Baha'i religion see itself as a continuation of Christianity and ignore Islam, which is a theological and ethical step backwards compared to Christianity?

What is your vision for the future?
To be a little bit better in my relationship with God.
 
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Dec 2012
204
Earth
Greetings Siddhanta108,

Welcome to the forum. Please convey our appreciation to the person that kindly directed you here.

There is a wide diversity of users on this forum. In addition to this, as its users live around the world, it often makes for some really interesting discussions. These can be far removed from some national perceptions on the Bahá’í Faith, because historically it was promoted inline with peoples national cultures. So for example, there is actually an enormous difference from the way Bahá’ís in English speaking states understand the Bahá’í Faith too. A matter that many American friends realise when they leave the U.S. Indeed some do not relish returning when they realise what they are missing. A very common view with Bahá’í U.S. Airforce wives. So relax and feel at home, because your insights will not be anymore out of place than those of anyone else, be they Bahá’ís or guests.

One of my greatest Bahá’í mentors was born and raised in India and her outlook towards spirituality has had a tremendous impact upon me and given me a very deep respect for Indian spiritual culture. Sadly she is no longer with us, but I always feel her presence when when a person from India is present. So it is particularly welcoming for me to find someone like yourself on the forum.

Here is looking forward to the discussions to come.

Earth
 
Oct 2019
32
Vrindavan
Hello, Earth,

Thank you very much for the nice greeting. Unfortunately, I am not from India, but since the writings were exported all over the world and made accessible through translations, there was the transcendent experience behind these writings, within the framework of different cultures. When we speak of a divine culture, it takes place behind the cultural level and is realized by the fact that every human being carries it out and implements it in his life.

That is why I am sceptical about the idea of an original religion, because religion is what comes into being and takes shape individually. What you say about the different ways of living religion also reflects also my experience. Religious studies also does not assume that there is a linear development of religions, but that each religion in itself is a unity which under development of external circumstances, society and environment underwent an inner development.

Within this system of coordinates, religions are evolving from simpler forms to the present and will continue to evolve. It is not only among Baha'i families and believers that cultural differences exist. Basically this is the case with all religions.

Have a good day,

Siddhanta
 

Jcc

Mar 2013
577
Edwardsville, Illinois, USA
Hello, Earth,

Thank you very much for the nice greeting. Unfortunately, I am not from India, but since the writings were exported all over the world and made accessible through translations, there was the transcendent experience behind these writings, within the framework of different cultures. When we speak of a divine culture, it takes place behind the cultural level and is realized by the fact that every human being carries it out and implements it in his life.

That is why I am sceptical about the idea of an original religion, because religion is what comes into being and takes shape individually. What you say about the different ways of living religion also reflects also my experience. Religious studies also does not assume that there is a linear development of religions, but that each religion in itself is a unity which under development of external circumstances, society and environment underwent an inner development.

Within this system of coordinates, religions are evolving from simpler forms to the present and will continue to evolve. It is not only among Baha'i families and believers that cultural differences exist. Basically this is the case with all religions.

Have a good day,

Siddhanta
Welcome!
There is a lot in what you say that I wholeheartedly agree with.

Good point about there not being an original religion. There many different traditional stories from the ancient religions about the creation of the world and origin of man. These have spiritual meaning, but of course should not be taken literally. What we know from modern science is that mankind has evolved over millions of years, and there is evidence of religious belief of some type in the physical artifacts of ancient man going back as far as we can see in the archaeological record. So, both from the Baha’i teachings, and from scientific evidence we can know that religion is intimately associated with man and has evolved over time along with us, or perhaps, we have evolved because of it, in other words, due to the action of the creative Word of God.
 
Oct 2019
32
Vrindavan
Good points you're leading.

My current religious studies have shown that the earliest religious developments (about 40000 B.C.) originally came with the area of sedentariness. People legitimized their territory by assigning their village or city to city deities.

With the emergence of territorial states, smaller units were merged and placed under the jurisdiction of a superior deity. So we can observe that religion has always been related to the unity of human groups since its earliest emergence.

I had to spontaneously think of the Baha'i faith in this discovery, which, as far as I understood it correctly, thematizes this unity.
 
Feb 2019
220
Chicago
Somewhat curious seems to me the idea of successive revelators. Baha'u'llah's message is much closer to the revelation of Jesus Christ than to the revelation of Mohammed. Nevertheless, in the Baha'i scriptures the Qur'an is described as more authentic. The Qur'an departs from the peaceful character of Christianity and is full of verses about war and struggle. In addition, there are many verses that draw a hostile line between believers and unbelievers. Why doesn't the Baha'i religion see itself as a continuation of Christianity and ignore Islam, which is a theological and ethical step backwards compared to Christianity?
Perhaps this will answer your question to some extent:

the Bab gradually confided that he was not merely a gate to the Hidden Imam but the manifestation of the expected Imam, the Qá'im himself, whose appearance the Shi`is expected for a thousand years. Preoccupied with numerology and occult sciences, the Bab drew on the fact that his "manifestation of the [divine] cause" occurred in the year 1260 AH, a thousand years after the presumed Greater Occultation of the Twelfth Imam, Muhammad ibn Hasan al-`Askari, in the year 260 AH/873-874. He also drew on the fact that he was a sayyid, a descendant of the house of the Prophet, from which the Mahdi will appear, while stressing his own intuitive experiences and visions, his purity of character, and his ability to utter holy verses similar to the Qur'án. Implicitly denying the doctrine of Occultation, he further stated that his manifestation was a symbolic return of the Lord of the Age and not the flesh-and-blood reappearance of Muhammad ibn Hasan al-`Askari, who had died a millennium earlier (Amanat 1989, 109-211)

 
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ams

Nov 2019
52
Thailand
Hi Siddhanta
Somewhat curious seems to me the idea of successive revelators. Baha'u'llah's message is much closer to the revelation of Jesus Christ than to the revelation of Mohammed. Nevertheless, in the Baha'i scriptures the Qur'an is described as more authentic. The Qur'an departs from the peaceful character of Christianity and is full of verses about war and struggle. In addition, there are many verses that draw a hostile line between believers and unbelievers. Why doesn't the Baha'i religion see itself as a continuation of Christianity and ignore Islam, which is a theological and ethical step backwards compared to Christianity?
I also think that the Quran is more authentic as the Bible.

Authentic in the sense... that the texts of the Bible went through more hands back to the OT- Prophets and Jesus' original speaking...
- and therfore are more colored by the many different "hands" between -
as it is the case with the texts in the Quran going back to the original speaking of the words of the Prophet Muhammad.

But why then the holy Quran "departs from the peaceful character"... in comparison with the Bible?
(for the Old Testament this is imho not the case, OT has very much violence... but for the New Testament it is, yes)

Because Jesus has strictly - very strictly - prohibited any violence.

Let's remember: Peter wanted to defend Jesus with violence in the Garden of Gethsemane.

Lord Jesus said to him: "Put your sword back Peter. Anyone fight with the sword will die from it". ( = Karma )

In case of the Prophet Muhammad ... he could not keep 100% nonviolence all the time. He would. But he couldn't.

Please note: I blame not. There were very angry people who want kill Muhammad. He could have let him killed (like Jesus did) to keep nonviolence.
Or fighting back with the sword. And Muhammad choose fighting back.

If one is in war with other people - even if he is a chosen Prophet of God - this would generate clouds between his consciousness and God.

There is no way to avoid this.

Neither for the Prophet Muhammad..

Neither it would had been avoidable for Lord Jesus... if he were choosing to fight back with the sword - as Peter wanted - against the Romans Soldier .... or against the religious authority of the Jews in their plan to let him crucify. (Jesus knew that they want kill him)

So that is the reason why the Quran departs - from a certain point on - from a peaceful character.

The consciousness of Muhammad - being in war with other people - affected the Message of God... that it was not 100% peaceful anymore.

All Muslims hopefully forgive me if they think that i - God forbid - want blaming the chosen Prophet Muhammad. I blame not. No.
 
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