How important is physical appearance ? - Abdul Baha

Sep 2017
370
Earth
#1
How important is physical appearance ? Many have told me not much, except for keeping clean and refined.

However, looking at the master I seem to be drawn to the way he looks and dresses and his mannerisms In his videos .. is this significant ?

Many people who met about Abdul Baha in the book Abdul Baha by husayn Balyuzi are impressed by how he looks, there are endless accounts ‘I haven’t met one whose appearance impressed me more’.

One part of me thinks physical appearance is not important, and society places to much of an emphasis on physical appearance and It’s vain, but I am also told that attraction to beauty is virtue .. and Abdul Baha being the example impressed people by how he looked.

Any thoughts?
 
Apr 2011
1,083
Hyrule
#2
There was one instance in which Abdu'l-Baha would only let the photographer snap a picture of his hand. Interesting story.

 
Sep 2018
19
Canada
#4
Personally I think the Sikh appearance works perfectly with the Baha'i belief. I think Baha'i's would likely enjoy how its symbolism that you wear
1) Kara (iron bangle) symbol for our unbreakable connection to God, and a constant reminder for service in His name
2) Kesh (uncut hair) Shows our submission to God, in that He was right to give up the hairs we have and make them grow how they do, you can also say since it means men with long hair and women with body hair it promotes equality to break down gender barriers
3) Kangha (wooden comb) to symbolise the physical and spiritual clean that a Sikh has, used 2x daily at least to maintain cleanness
4) Kirpan (Dagger) to symbolise the truth cutting lies away, and also to use for only defense as a last resort, a tool to show you are a defender of people needing it
5) Kacchera (Drawstring boxers) to aid in chastity and be symbol of purity (they are white, this also has a dual symbol of death in Indian culture, it was meant to be a uniform with wartime to help in horse riding too when Sikhs needed to defend)

Your appearance matters because while you are detached its not ok to let your body go to ruins, its a holy temple that needs your care

Hope I helped
 
Likes: Rani
Sep 2017
370
Earth
#5
Personally I think the Sikh appearance works perfectly with the Baha'i belief. I think Baha'i's would likely enjoy how its symbolism that you wear
1) Kara (iron bangle) symbol for our unbreakable connection to God, and a constant reminder for service in His name
2) Kesh (uncut hair) Shows our submission to God, in that He was right to give up the hairs we have and make them grow how they do, you can also say since it means men with long hair and women with body hair it promotes equality to break down gender barriers
3) Kangha (wooden comb) to symbolise the physical and spiritual clean that a Sikh has, used 2x daily at least to maintain cleanness
4) Kirpan (Dagger) to symbolise the truth cutting lies away, and also to use for only defense as a last resort, a tool to show you are a defender of people needing it
5) Kacchera (Drawstring boxers) to aid in chastity and be symbol of purity (they are white, this also has a dual symbol of death in Indian culture, it was meant to be a uniform with wartime to help in horse riding too when Sikhs needed to defend)

Your appearance matters because while you are detached its not ok to let your body go to ruins, its a holy temple that needs your care

Hope I helped
Thank you, for me refinement is important, and uncut hair does not appeal to me. We may need outward symbols to remind us of our inner spiritual life, however we can attain a degree of spirituality where we need no outward symbols to remind us. How many a outward spiritual man, fails to tend to the inner garden of his heart
 
Sep 2018
19
Canada
#6
I agree, many Hindus look outwardly spiritual yet fail terribly at connecting to the Lord. Sikhi though I would say does not fall into this trap, because Sikhs aren't called to just live spiritually like in other religions. Sikhs hold themselves to a higher standard as the Guru Granth says. It is about being an example to others, not following the pack. The higher ideal is what matters. Like how Abdulbaha talk about vegetarian being for the future but meat still okay. Khalsa lifestyle does not eat meat because it is the higher ideal even if meat is not forbidden. Alcohol and drugs like your religion aren't touched because so many already do and we need to be examples. the 5 kakars are to get one to live the disciplined life. To embody Khlasa (I guess even as Baha'i) is to embody the purest refinements, holding yourself to a higher standard than the common folk so that we can be exemplars. It looks like Abdulbaha though it looks he only wore kesh, embodies the khalsa standards, and he is the Baha'i example to follow. He was disciplined in himself to become an example. That is refinement, not cutting your hair to look like "professionals" but to hold yourself to God's definition of refinement.

Long hair is to me more refinement than cutting it short. It does not matter if others will see you as unrefined, you are exactly as the Lord designed you. To cut the hair is just logic to me, God put it there, so let it grow, he was right to put it there and make it grow, to cut it is saying God/nature was wrong to give you that hair. You alter your natural body by doing this. It might not appeal to you but it's the right thing to do. Of course if it's some sort of condition that is not regular to the body things may change.

To answer the original question, outward appearance is important for accepting the way you were created and not resisting it, and taking care of your body is so important because it is a temple. My message sounds aggressive but please don't take it like that, I wrote this with much smiling and positivity to answer your question my english is not the best as it's second nature to me.

Be refined in the eyes of God and not in the eyes of others.
 
Sep 2017
370
Earth
#7
I agree, many Hindus look outwardly spiritual yet fail terribly at connecting to the Lord. Sikhi though I would say does not fall into this trap, because Sikhs aren't called to just live spiritually like in other religions. Sikhs hold themselves to a higher standard as the Guru Granth says. It is about being an example to others, not following the pack. The higher ideal is what matters. Like how Abdulbaha talk about vegetarian being for the future but meat still okay. Khalsa lifestyle does not eat meat because it is the higher ideal even if meat is not forbidden. Alcohol and drugs like your religion aren't touched because so many already do and we need to be examples. the 5 kakars are to get one to live the disciplined life. To embody Khlasa (I guess even as Baha'i) is to embody the purest refinements, holding yourself to a higher standard than the common folk so that we can be exemplars. It looks like Abdulbaha though it looks he only wore kesh, embodies the khalsa standards, and he is the Baha'i example to follow. He was disciplined in himself to become an example. That is refinement, not cutting your hair to look like "professionals" but to hold yourself to God's definition of refinement.

Long hair is to me more refinement than cutting it short. It does not matter if others will see you as unrefined, you are exactly as the Lord designed you. To cut the hair is just logic to me, God put it there, so let it grow, he was right to put it there and make it grow, to cut it is saying God/nature was wrong to give you that hair. You alter your natural body by doing this. It might not appeal to you but it's the right thing to do. Of course if it's some sort of condition that is not regular to the body things may change.

To answer the original question, outward appearance is important for accepting the way you were created and not resisting it, and taking care of your body is so important because it is a temple. My message sounds aggressive but please don't take it like that, I wrote this with much smiling and positivity to answer your question my english is not the best as it's second nature to me.

Be refined in the eyes of God and not in the eyes of others.
I don’t feel as if you are aggressive, but Abdul Baha did trim his hair, well his beard hair anyway, as there are pictures where this is clearly visible. I have nothing against those who do not wish to trim their hair, each to their own :).

Sikhs are wonderful people, Guru Nanak was also wonderful. There are bad apples in every tree, but they do not of course represent the message.

May God guide us to His ways
 
May 2013
1,786
forest falls california
#8
I agree, many Hindus look outwardly spiritual yet fail terribly at connecting to the Lord. Sikhi though I would say does not fall into this trap, because Sikhs aren't called to just live spiritually like in other religions. Sikhs hold themselves to a higher standard as the Guru Granth says. It is about being an example to others, not following the pack. The higher ideal is what matters. Like how Abdulbaha talk about vegetarian being for the future but meat still okay. Khalsa lifestyle does not eat meat because it is the higher ideal even if meat is not forbidden. Alcohol and drugs like your religion aren't touched because so many already do and we need to be examples. the 5 kakars are to get one to live the disciplined life. To embody Khlasa (I guess even as Baha'i) is to embody the purest refinements, holding yourself to a higher standard than the common folk so that we can be exemplars. It looks like Abdulbaha though it looks he only wore kesh, embodies the khalsa standards, and he is the Baha'i example to follow. He was disciplined in himself to become an example. That is refinement, not cutting your hair to look like "professionals" but to hold yourself to God's definition of refinement.

Long hair is to me more refinement than cutting it short. It does not matter if others will see you as unrefined, you are exactly as the Lord designed you. To cut the hair is just logic to me, God put it there, so let it grow, he was right to put it there and make it grow, to cut it is saying God/nature was wrong to give you that hair. You alter your natural body by doing this. It might not appeal to you but it's the right thing to do. Of course if it's some sort of condition that is not regular to the body things may change.

To answer the original question, outward appearance is important for accepting the way you were created and not resisting it, and taking care of your body is so important because it is a temple. My message sounds aggressive but please don't take it like that, I wrote this with much smiling and positivity to answer your question my english is not the best as it's second nature to me.

Be refined in the eyes of God and not in the eyes of others.
Simply a comparison here. God also causes our fingernails and toenails to grow. Should we not trim them? Personally, in my youthful days when growing long hair was important to me, I found that working as a mechanic, it was very impractical and dangerous, as leaning over a car, if the hair falls near the engine and a belt is running, I could be seriously injured or killed. There is a wisdom in the Laws of God as given by Baha'u'llah for the Age in which we live, and He advocates sciences, crafts, and employment. We are to be worker bees, and in modern society, we must trim our fingernails, toenails, and perhaps even our hair and beard for practical reasons.
 
Sep 2018
19
Canada
#9
The comparison to fingernails has been responded to by many other Sikhs better in english than me to explain, it's worth Google searching though. The living part of nails isn't cut only the gray dead bit, it's similar to combing our hair to get the dead hairs out. Also tie your hair in a bun, it will not fall. Most sikhs wear turbans too which prevents your issue. I understand what you come from however
 
Feb 2019
164
Chicago
#10
Many Hindu yogis keep their hair long because they use it as a medium to draw cosmic energy from the ether in to their bodies and also to preserve certain energies. They do not eat much but live off of the cosmic energy that they tap in to using esoteric yogic practices.


 
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