How to practise the law of 'reciting the verses of God every morn and eventide'?

May 2017
26
Earth
#1
I'm having a hard time understanding what this refers to specifically.

"Recite ye the verses of God every morn and eventide. Whoso faileth to recite them hath not been faithful to the Covenant of God and His Testament..." - Baha'u'llah

1. Does this involve both prayer and reading the Writings, or just reading the Writings.
2. What are the specifications for 'morn' and 'eventide'. Are the morning and evening times identical to the specifications for the obligatory prayer times?

With these two questions, I would appreciate it if you could refer me to messages and guidance rather than just opinion, thank you.

I've tried looking around but can't find any definitive answers. I've always understood the verse as meaning both prayer and reading, and 'eventide' as being any time before I sleep, but from a previous post here, I realized it could just be referring to reading the Writings, and if 'eventide' means evening that might be specifically between sunset and 2 hours after sunset. Does that mean praying in the morning and night is not a Baha'i Law?

If it helps, what is the answer to Ruhi Book 1, Unit 2, Section 8, Question 3, where it asks “At least how many times should we pray each day?” My whole teaching team has been putting down 'three times' for years lol.
 
Jul 2017
78
Denver, CO
#3
I recently opened this thread where you might find some useful perspective.

What matters most is that one seeks hungrily after nearness to God. One way to do this is by constantly refreshing one's mind with draughts from the Ocean of His Word (the writings and teachings of the Manifestations of God.)
 
Jul 2017
64
Germany
#4
Dear divan9,

I have anready anwered No. 1 in the mentioned thread. Here is a letter from the Universal House of Justice concerning the definition of "Verses of God".

the Universal House of Justice said:
Bahá’u’lláh states that the essential “requisite” for reciting “the verses of God” is the “eagerness and love” of the believers to “read the Word of God” (Q and A 68). With regard to the definition of “verses of God”, Bahá’u’lláh states that it refers to “all that hath been sent down from the Heaven of Divine Utterance”. Shoghi Effendi, in a letter written to one of the believers in the East, has clarified that the term “verses of God” does not include the writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá; he has likewise indicated that this term does not apply to his own writings.
As for 2: There is no specific time set. I personally think that it is more of a reminder to read the Writings on a regular basis rather than fixed times. But I once thought about asking the House of Justice for clarification. These were my early times as a Bahá'í though. At present I wouldn't bother with details - neither me nor them. ;-)
 
May 2017
26
Earth
#6
I have anready anwered No. 1 in the mentioned thread. Here is a letter from the Universal House of Justice concerning the definition of "Verses of God".
So in the Baha'i Faith, praying morning and night is not a requirement, but perhaps just a recommendation? Which would mean the answer to the Book 1 question is 'we should pray at lease once a day?'
 
Jul 2017
64
Germany
#7
So in the Baha'i Faith, praying morning and night is not a requirement, but perhaps just a recommendation?
I haven't heard of a law concerning praying at night yet. There is the religious duty to recite one of the Obligatory Prayers which also sets the time when to read it. All other prayers are voluntary. If you'd take every time one of the Central Figures said "Say this prayer every morning" or "Say this prayer in this situation" as a law we'd do nothing else but pray all day long. :noob:
 
Jul 2017
78
Denver, CO
#8
There are three Obligatory prayers: The Short Obligatory Prayer, the Medium Obligatory Prayer, and the Long Obligatory Prayer. Upon believers, it is enjoined to perform at least one of these each day, which, if performed in a spirit of humble reverence, will result in the individual drawing closer to God.
 

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