Huquq, its importance and ways to do it

Jun 2011
1,543
Somewhere "in this immensity"
I think it would be nice if we shared different ideas about how we understand the law, and, how we have tried to impliment it or possibly, ways we have imagined but haven't yet tried!

I will start the thread with something posted in a thread about the funds, about Huquq that I thought would be better in a new thread on the topic of Huquq.

Rani said:
Offering Huquq is a bounty as we are told, and it also seems a little complicated to me.

I think I could pay it at the moment -although I'll need to check on the forever changing price of gold; But, I've asked myself whether I should purchase some items like a washing machine, television (I am still contenting myself with an old analogue one), a kindle etc, renew a passport just maybe.. yada.
In purchasing some of those it might threaten my ability to pay Huquq right away.

Do I see these things as essentials or non-essentials? I guess only I can say..

(I have a wm btw, but I don't like it -too small and seemingly rough on my clothes.

Hope this wasn't too personal of me to share..
Fadl said:
I will tell you a method my wife and I started recently that works well so far.

We bought a nice little decorated box to set where we always see it, and at the point of purchase of anything, we decide: needful / not needlful. If it is not needful, then we save the receipt. Every month, we tally the receipts and if the tally reaches the rate of 19 mithqals of gold, then we calculate 19% of that portion and pay it. If any portion was left in excess of the 19 mithqals amount, the sum is carried over to the next calculation period and factored in with the receipts at that time. We have a nice little notebook in the box where we record the sums and payments, etc to keep track of it all. We then intend, at the end of the year, to see what savings we have, and if applicable, pay huquq on that.

The benefits of this method are:

1. We don't get behind and build a big debt to Huquq (which would feel awful)
2. We pay it frequently, and just about when it is due (ie when it reaches 19 mithqals value)
3. We have the huquq in our mind daily, and we think about our expeneses and what is necessary or not necessary in our lives, and that is a wonderful thing.

Anyway, it is a new approach for us, and I really prefer it to a complicated end of year accounting, because I am not a good book keeper, and I lose and forget things easily and would probably not accurately calculate it if I waited for once a year. Also, if I die unexpetedly.....you get the idea. :yes:
 
Jun 2011
1,543
Somewhere "in this immensity"
Could you explain your method in a little more detail? I'm slightly confused by it
Basically, I am doing it inside out.

So you know, basically whenever a person acquires 19 mithqals of gold, less needful expenses, such as your home, furnishings, etc. 19 percent of that is due. So, rather than deducting my exemptions, I am taxing myself on things that are NOT exempted. That way, the only thing left to do is calculate on my savings.

A less backwards way, would be to determine your savings once a year, then deduct all the exempt items, add back in all the non exempt items, see if you reach 19 mithqals ( a huquq unit) and then pay 19 % of that.

I found my method easier for me because I keep up as I go, and, by taxing myself on that which is not exempt, I don't worry that I forget to add it back to my savings total later, meaning I would under pay Huquq. Of course, there are lots of ways to do this, and mine is only a way, not necessarily the best. I've only started it a few months back this way, so I will see at the end of the year how much better it is than how I did it before. I can say that so far this way feels easier, and I like that I can do the payment more often because it is such a spiritual thing, really.
 
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Oct 2012
142
Earth
Basically, I am doing it inside out.
rather than deducting my exemptions, I am taxing myself on things that are NOT exempted.
Makes sense.

I just checked the current US price for gold its 55.23-55.46
Lets take $55.46/gram for the sake of simplicity.
1 Mithqal is 4.46g?
So 19 Mithqals would be 84.74 grams of gold?

So 55.46 X 84.74
which is
4699.6804
So for every $4699 you would pay 19% ? which is about $892

If I'm right so far, is the $4699 based on everything bought that is not necessaries? Or would it be $4699 minus the necessities then 19% of that?

I just happen to have a math exam tomorrow haha
 
May 2011
507
Australia
57. Thou hast written that they have pledged themselves to observe maximum austerity in their lives with a view to forwarding the remainder of their income to His exalted presence. This matter was mentioned at His holy court. He said: Let them act with moderation and not impose hardship upon themselves. We would like them both to enjoy a life that is well-pleasing.

(Compilations, Huququ'llah)

For me, and from my perspective, I think it might be austere to tax myself on every small and not-quite-necessary item. But we all must make these decisions ourselves everyday about whether something is necessary and helpful to our development, or whether it is possibly just a waste.

I mean, am I going to pay Huquq on the $6 DVD I have in my cupboard or the biography that I didn't absolutely need in my bookshelf? I'd really rather not. I'd prefer to just have an attitude of simplicity, try to be mindful of how I use my money, bearing in mind advice (to the seeker) to be 'content with little' and also the principle of moderation; and then pay Huquq on my savings (assuming I have saved at least the equivalent of 19 mithqals of gold).

About 3 yrs ago, I was almost ready to pay Huquq and these really cheap overseas flights were advertised. A friend was encouraging me to go and there was just a day or two before the offer would expire. I contacted my Huquq representative and described the situation, and asked him for advice. At the time, he said that a holiday could be seen as an expense and that I could purchase a ticket with an open heart.
I was slightly surprised by his response, and I did proceed to purchase it. But I really didn't need it, so I hope I would act with more inner assurance given a similar situation again.
 
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May 2011
507
Australia
Ah makes sense.

On a side note: Anyone know what a dowry is? its mentioned in your link but I've never heard of it before. If someone wants they can pm me as id rather not hijack this thread
Um, I haven't read up on it recently but here is some info below..

I'm quite sure that it is one of those laws that is not applied to baha'is yet. Just like it took a while for the law of Huquq to apply to believers around the globe.
Kinda cool though that it's the bridegroom that pays and not the bride's parents. hehe. ;-

93. No marriage may be contracted without payment
of a dowry # 66

The Synopsis and Codification, section IV.C.1.j.i.-v.,
summarizes the main provisions concerning the dowry.
These provisions have their antecedents in the Bayan.

The dowry is to be paid by the bridegroom to the
bride. It is fixed at 19 mithqals of pure gold for city-dwellers,
and 19 mithqals of silver for village-dwellers (see
note 94). Bahá'u'lláh indicates that, if, at the time of the
wedding, the bridegroom is unable to pay the dowry in full,
it is permissible for him to issue a promissory note to the
bride (Q and A 39).
With the Revelation of Bahá'u'lláh many familiar
concepts, customs and institutions are redefined and take on
new meaning. One of these is the dowry. The institution of
dowry is a very ancient practice in many cultures and takes
many forms. In some countries it is a payment made by the
parents of the bride to the bridegroom; in others it is a
payment made by the bridegroom to the parents of the
bride, called a "bride-price". In both such cases the amount
is often quite considerable. The law of Bahá'u'lláh abolishes
all such variants and converts the dowry into a symbolic act
whereby the bridegroom presents a gift of a certain limited
value to the bride.

The Kitabi-Aqdas. p. 207.
 
Sep 2010
4,645
Normanton, Far North West Queensland
Makes sense.

I just checked the current US price for gold its 55.23-55.46
Lets take $55.46/gram for the sake of simplicity.
1 Mithqal is 4.46g?
So 19 Mithqals would be 84.74 grams of gold?

So 55.46 X 84.74
which is
4699.6804
So for every $4699 you would pay 19% ? which is about $892

If I'm right so far, is the $4699 based on everything bought that is not necessaries? Or would it be $4699 minus the necessities then 19% of that?

I just happen to have a math exam tomorrow haha
As I understand it, You do not calculate Huquq on the necessities as these are exempt from Huquq - One must refer to the writings to decide for themselves what would constitute a necessity.

I would calculate the value of any owned item that is not a necessity and add them up including any savings. If they Total over 19 Mithqals, then Huquq is paid on this amount over19 Mithqals. The next year you go through the same process but you do not include the items that Huquq is already paid on. If you have not accumulated any extra wealth then no more Huquq is payable.

What I have not contemplated yet is "What if your non necessity item carries a debt? For example you buy a boat at a value of $45,000 and have a loan for 30,000 to pay off! What happens to the interest on the loan? In the end a $45,000 boat will cost you around maybe $55,000 when you add interest. So do you calculate the $45,000 minus the cost to carry the debt making Huquq payable on $35,000????

I see a job in the future for Huquq Accountants :cool: :yes:

Regards Tony
 
May 2011
507
Australia
If I'm right so far, is the $4699 based on everything bought that is not necessaries? Or would it be $4699 minus the necessities then 19% of that?

Yea, I just did a rough calculation, and as at 31st Oct, I think the value of 19 mithqals of gold in US dollars is $3976.33. Changeable daily in small fluctuations of course.

So it means that if after, you have paid all of your necessary expenses for the year, if you have acquired $3976, or the value of that in unnecessary items, then you pay 19% of whatever you have acquired if it is equivalent to that or if it exceeds that amount.
If you have only saved $1000, for eg. you pay nothing.

And and other have said, your house, and necessary furnishings and things you need to carry on your profession are exempt.