Introducing Vinayaka

Aug 2018
32
New Zealand
#1
We may have a special visitor to our forum, a Hindu named Vinayaka who I've been talking to over the last 2 years on another forum. He has been a committed Saivite Hindu for the last 40 years and he would be here to answer any questions about Hinduism from general Hindu, Saivite and then personal perspective. I invited him to join us as some of us like myself don't get to talk in depth to too many Hindus about thier faith. Its important to note that Vinayaka isn't interested in changing religions. He was a little apprehensive when invited that we might proselytise about the Baha'i Faith. I assured him we wouldn't. :)
 
Apr 2019
14
Canada
#2
Thanks Adrian, and to the mods here for approving this. So a bit about me ... born atheist, found Hinduism at about age 18, officially converted (change of name) at age 26, Canadian, Caucasian, retired teacher.
I've been a guest speaker occasionally in schools, at colleges, basically for the same reason as here. At those times I often ask which answer to a question someone wants: a) my perception of the general Hindu answer, b) my sect's answer, or c) my personal answer. So we can do any of those. For anyone looking for info on Hinduism, there are many introductory books or websites, so just as I have resources available to me about Baha'i faith, so too do you about Hindu religion. But engaging directly with folks is sometimes more productive, perhaps less boring. I've been engaging now with several Baha'is, including Adrian and Tony, for a couple of years, who are also active on this forum.

That's about it. Any questions?
 
Apr 2019
14
Canada
#5
Hi Vinayaka,

Do you have any favorite writers or books to recommend on Hinduism?
Hi. Thanks for the question.
Firstly, Hinduism isn't really that much of a book religion. The focus is more on practice. There are hundreds of books though. For non-Hindus, I usually recommend this one: Himalayan Academy Publications - What Is Hinduism? It gives a general overview, and is written in fairly simple American English, is reasonably short, and is free on-line. So it's a good overview of a vast topic.
 
Apr 2019
14
Canada
#6
Why is Krishna depicted with blue skin? I recently read an interesting article about this here.
Thanks for the question.
Since I'm not a Vaishnavite personally, I know very little about Krishna. My sect is Saiva. I certainly couldn't add any more than the author in your link did. The internet probably has other answers as well.
 
Feb 2019
164
Chicago
#7
Hi Vinayaka,

Do you have any favorite writers or books to recommend on Hinduism?
I am a Hindu too. I would recommend Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda published by Self-Realization Fellowship.

One book in particular stayed with Steve Jobs his entire life, Autobiography of a Yogi...'the guide to meditation and spirituality that he had first read as a teenager, then re-read in India and had read once a year ever since.' --Huffington Post, review of Walter Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs

Selected as "One of the 100 Best Spiritual Books of the Twentieth Century", Autobiography of a Yogi has been translated into more than 50 languages, and is regarded worldwide as a classic of religious literature. Several million copies have been sold, and it continues to appear on best-seller lists after more than sixty consecutive years in print.
With engaging candor, eloquence, and wit, Paramahansa Yogananda tells the inspiring chronicle of his life: the experiences of his remarkable childhood, encounters with many saints and sages during his youthful search throughout India for an illumined teacher, ten years of training in the hermitage of a revered yoga master, and the thirty years that he lived and taught in America. Also recorded here are his meetings with Mahatma Gandhi, Rabindranath Tagore, Luther Burbank, the Catholic stigmatist Therese Neumann, and other celebrated spiritual personalities of East and West. The author clearly explains the subtle but definite laws behind both the ordinary events of everyday life and the extraordinary events commonly termed miracles. His absorbing life story becomes the background for a penetrating and unforgettable look at the ultimate mysteries of human existence.

About the Author
Hailed as the father of Yoga in the West, Paramahansa Yogananda is regarded as one of the great spiritual figures of our time. Born in northern India, he came to the United States in 1920, where for more than 30 years he taught the ancient science of meditation and the art of balanced spiritual living. That same year he founded Self-Realization Fellowship, to disseminate his writings and teachings worldwide. Through his best-selling classic, Autobiography of a Yogi, and his numerous other books, he has introduced millions throughout the world to the spiritual principles of yoga meditation and the universal truths underlying all world religions.

Autobiography of a Yogi — with Bonus CD – SRF Bookstore
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Feb 2019
164
Chicago
#8
Meditate profoundly, that the secret of things unseen may be revealed unto you, that you may inhale the sweetness of a spiritual and imperishable fragrance, and that you may acknowledge the truth that from time immemorial even unto eternity the Almighty hath tried, and will continue to try, His servants, so that light may be distinguished from darkness, truth from falsehood, right from wrong, guidance from error, happiness from misery, and roses from thorns. - Bahaullah, The Kitáb-i-Íqán
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Feb 2019
164
Chicago
#9
Abdul Baha on Meditation

You cannot apply the name “man” to any being void of this faculty of meditation; without it he would be a mere animal, lower than the beasts.

Through the faculty of meditation man attains to eternal life; through it he receives the breath of the Holy Spirit—the bestowal of the Spirit is given in reflection and meditation.

The spirit of man is itself informed and strengthened during meditation; through it affairs of which man knew nothing are unfolded before his view. Through it he receives Divine inspiration, through it he receives heavenly food.

Meditation is the key for opening the doors of mysteries. In that state man abstracts himself: in that state man withdraws himself from all outside objects; in that subjective mood he is immersed in the ocean of spiritual life and can unfold the secrets of things-in-themselves. To illustrate this, think of man as endowed with two kinds of sight; when the power of insight is being used the outward power of vision does not see.

This faculty of meditation frees man from the animal nature, discerns the reality of things, puts man in touch with God. This faculty brings forth from the invisible plane the sciences and arts. – Abdu’l-Baha, Paris Talks, pp. 173-175.
 
Likes: tonyfish58

Similar threads