Krishna- Reincarnation - Bhagavad Gita

Oct 2019
57
Vrindavan
Let me also mention that even i'm not able to interpret the Bhagavad-gita because i'm not much familar with i.e. the symbolics..
It happens to a lot of people. Therefore different translations can be used. In any case, I would recommend to take a translation that includes the original verses in Sanskrit and a word-to-word transmission so that the translation becomes transparent for you.
 

ams

Nov 2019
88
Thailand
It happens to a lot of people. Therefore different translations can be used. In any case, I would recommend to take a translation that includes the original verses in Sanskrit and a word-to-word transmission so that the translation becomes transparent for you.
Thank you for this.

Until now... since decades ... i loved listening to Hindus explaining and "translating" the meanings of the divine Bhagavad-gita teachings to me.. as a western, growing up in Christianity.

Many things in i.e. the Bible i was then understand much much better... which were before just a mystery to me.

I don't know whether Yogananda is considered as an Avatar... but for me... reading his teachings... he was.
 

ams

Nov 2019
88
Thailand
Also the same for me... for the Baha'i teachings.

Personaly... in the Baha'i Faith... i'm attached very to the words of Abdul-Baha.

Very clear words of deep divine Truth and Widsom... rarely listening to such... in the abrahamatic context.

If especially the muslim world (but also christianity and judaism) would be able to recognize those widsom... all would only profit.
 
Oct 2019
57
Vrindavan
I don't know whether Yogananda is considered as an Avatar... but for me... reading his teachings... he was.
Recently I had visited a Yogananda group, Society of Self-realization, perhaps the name is not right. I found it very different. A Christian service was imitated, with a variation of the Father's Our Prayer, Lecture, Collection, Intercessions.

The translation of Yogananda's Bhagavad-gita is praised from many different sides, it is said to be one of the best. But what was offered there was a half thing in which I had neither a Christian message, nor really anything of the realization of the Eastern religions.

It seemed like a mixture of Charismatics, Evangelicals and Free Churches. Eclecticism, in my opinion, is not what leads to unity. But I don't think that what was offered there was really part of Yogananda's mission.
 

ams

Nov 2019
88
Thailand
Recently I had visited a Yogananda group, Society of Self-realization ...
Do you mean the Self-Realization Fellowship Group? Their website: yogananda.org

From Wiki:

- Founded by Paramahansa Yogananda in 1920 and served as head until his death in March 1952

- Leaded by Mrinalini Mata until her death 2017,

- She was one of the close disciples of Yogananda personally chosen and trained by him to help guide his society after his passing

Self-Realization Fellowship - Wikipedia


... which I had neither a Christian message
Mhh... may i ask, what in your view is the core if the Christian Message?

Greetings
Ams
 
Oct 2019
57
Vrindavan
Mhh... may i ask, what in your view is the core if the Christian Message?
The question lies on an intellectual level. On this level I cannot answer your question. It was an impression. But at least I would say that someone who wants to focus on Jesus Christ will probably go to a Christian group. That was what I meant by imitation. In the Bhagavad-gita there are so many gods and in India there is such a complex philosophy, why should yoga focus on Jesus Christ? And on the other hand, why should someone who is interested in the message of Christ go to a small yoga group?
And why should one meditate for an hour according to a philosophy of impersonality and then go into an almost sentimental and absolutely personal invocation "Jesus Christ some" which was so close to the practice of the mormons I knew that you had to remember once again that it was a yoga group ? Where is the common ground? That's what I meant by nothing half and nothing whole. You didn't have a clear focus in the group, it seemed to be thrown together.
It is hard for me to imagine that what I experienced there was really the spiritual direction that Yogananda embodied. But this is not a rational and objective description, but only my subjective impression.
 

ams

Nov 2019
88
Thailand
Hi Siddhanta

it's not my intention - god forbid- to speak against your experience.


But i believe in this statement made by Yogananda, quoted via SRF:

... to reveal the complete harmony and basic oneness

of original Christianity as taught by Jesus Christ

and original Yoga as taught by Bhagavan Krishna;

and to show that these principles of truth are the common scientific foundation of all true religions.

Also the other core-aims which reminds me very much to the core of the Baha'i Faith:


- To unite science and religion through realization of the unity of their underlying principles.

- To advocate cultural and spiritual understanding between East and West, and the exchange of their finest distinctive features.


- To encourage “plain living and high thinking”; and to spread a spirit of brotherhood among all peoples by teaching the eternal basis of their unity: kinship with God.

- To disseminate among the nations a knowledge... for attaining direct personal experience of God.

- To serve mankind as one’s larger Self



Aims and Ideals
 
Oct 2019
57
Vrindavan
Yes, I understand. The reason why I added that it was only my personal impression is to make it clear that this statement is not based on any objective analysis and therefore does not require any attention beyond the point of discussion.

But Yogananda seems to me like a "Baha'u'llah of the East". Writing a 2-volume explanation of the New Testament is a remarkable achievement. With regard to the Bhagavad Gita, exactly the same.

Even if Hinduism does not interest many Baha'i, I think that Yogananda's mission should be taken into account. Especially with an interreligious approach, Yogananda's writings can certainly provide much that is helpful.
 

ams

Nov 2019
88
Thailand
Yogananda seems to me like a "Baha'u'llah of the East".
Yes, quite comparable :)

I see Baha'u'llah's divine revelations (+ 'Abdu'l-Bahá,'s explanations) ... specially desigend as an opportunity for traditional Islam.

Of course, not only for Islam... No. Because simultaneously it is also an universal teaching and revelations,
where also traditional Judaism and Christianity could gain a lot.... ie. for getting rid of each others contradictions.

And in the deep spiritual core - the Union of God with all - ... it is in my view
the same spiritual core teachings of the divine revelations of Hindu/Bhagavad Gita

(especially if it explained - for Western/Christianity Culture, which are my roots - by Master Yogananda... )

But it is also the core of Christ and Buddhist teachings.

Yes, even the spiritual teachings of Judaism (Kabbalah) ... and Islam (via Sufism).

In the end... all is pointing to the same core found in all major religions.

From whatever Religion one would look to it.

They are all planets... orbiting the sun.
 
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Oct 2019
57
Vrindavan
I see Baha'u'llah's divine revelations (+ 'Abdu'l-Bahá,'s explanations) ... specially desigend as an opportunity for traditional Islam.
That was also my basic impression when I read the texts of Baha'u'llah, Abdu'l-Baha or Shoghi Effendi. For Christians the many quotes from the Koran are uninteresting and also the way Baha'u'llah talks about God is more in a way we know from the Koran. In addition, Baha'u'llah now also comes classically from the Muslim background. Somewhere I read that the Koran has a higher significance than the Bible in the Baha'i Revelation, because of the argument of the time. Baha'u'llah provides many things that are present in Christian Revelation but were still missing in Islam (e.g. grace before justice) to Muslims through his Revelation. Therefore I agree with your impression.