Muslim roommate with Bahai

Jun 2014
3
United States
Hello everyone,

So I am a Persian muslim and I might be rooming with a Bahai (I think he's Persian too) for college. We're both male. I come from a religious family but I am not practicing myself. I follow certain guidelines such as only eating halal meat due to both habit and out of respect to my parents (as I still live under their roof). I will be meeting my potential roommate soon but I wanted to get some background information. I am not familiar with the Bahai faith at all since I was born and raised in the USA and the topic never really came up. However, when I told my parents the person is Bahai they were a bit hesitant because there are (from what I was told) bad relations between the two faiths.

I personally do not have any issues with the being roommates with someone of any faith as long as they respect me and my boundaries (which are common limitations many people would agree on. For example, no smoking/no drugs)

My questions is: Would you, as a follower of the Bahai faith, be willing to be roommates with someone who comes from an Islamic background? or is that an immediate rejection?

Thanks!
 
Nov 2012
949
Florida
My questions is: Would you, as a follower of the Bahai faith, be willing to be roommates with someone who comes from an Islamic background? or is that an immediate rejection?

Thanks!

As a Baha'i, I would have absolutely no problem rooming with a Muslim. You might find the following from Shoghi Effendi, the Guardian of the Baha'i Faith, helpful:


"The Faith standing identified with the name of Bahá'u'lláh disclaims any intention to belittle any of the Prophets gone before Him, to whittle down any of their teachings, to obscure, however slightly, the radiance of their Revelations, to oust them from the hearts of their followers, to abrogate the fundamentals of their doctrines, to discard any of their revealed Books, or to suppress the legitimate aspirations of their adherents. Repudiating the claim of any religion to be the final revelation of God to man, disclaiming finality for His own Revelation, Bahá'u'lláh inculcates the basic principle of the relativity of religious truth, the continuity of Divine Revelation, the progressiveness of religious experience. His aim is to widen the basis of all revealed religions and to unravel the mysteries of their scriptures. He insists on the unqualified recognition of the unity of their purpose, restates the eternal verities they enshrine, coordinates their functions, distinguishes the essential and the authentic from the nonessential and spurious in their teachings, separates the God-given truths from the priest-prompted superstitions, and on this as a basis proclaims the possibility, and even prophecies the inevitability, of their unification, and the consummation of their highest hopes.

As to Muhammad, the Apostle of God, let none among His followers who read these pages, think for a moment that either Islám, or its Prophet, or His Book, or His appointed Successors, or any of His authentic teachings, have been, or are to be in any way, or to however slight a degree, disparaged."
 
Jun 2014
3
United States
Would you consider your opinion to be the majority consensus?

Also, is there anything specific I should know about the faith prior to meeting him? I just want to show that I'm not completely ignorant if he asks me

thanks for the quote!
 
Nov 2012
949
Florida
Would you consider your opinion to be the majority consensus?

Also, is there anything specific I should know about the faith prior to meeting him? I just want to show that I'm not completely ignorant if he asks me

thanks for the quote!

Absolutely the majority consensus; even more than a consensus. Belief in Baha'u'llah also requires belief in all the Prophets gone before, including Muhammad.

Below is a link for more information about our Faith and beliefs:

The Bahá
 
Oct 2011
4,213
Quilimari,Chile
Hello everyone,

So I am a Persian muslim and I might be rooming with a Bahai (I think he's Persian too) for college. We're both male. I come from a religious family but I am not practicing myself. I follow certain guidelines such as only eating halal meat due to both habit and out of respect to my parents (as I still live under their roof). I will be meeting my potential roommate soon but I wanted to get some background information. I am not familiar with the Bahai faith at all since I was born and raised in the USA and the topic never really came up. However, when I told my parents the person is Bahai they were a bit hesitant because there are (from what I was told) bad relations between the two faiths.

I personally do not have any issues with the being roommates with someone of any faith as long as they respect me and my boundaries (which are common limitations many people would agree on. For example, no smoking/no drugs)

My questions is: Would you, as a follower of the Bahai faith, be willing to be roommates with someone who comes from an Islamic background? or is that an immediate rejection?

Thanks!
Dear friend most Baha'is would not have any problem being roommates with you, if they had a problem possibly they are not good Baha'is :bigsmile:

For just like Muslims you will discover Baha'is are not perfect either. We are all on a journey to improve our lives and live by the teachings of God. It is a daily struggle of submission to the will of God/Allah.

Best wishes to you
 
Dec 2012
207
Earth
Greetings Cookoosabzi,

A number of Bahá’ís are married to sincere Muslims or people from Muslim families. This more than anything should allay any concerns you might have. Any idea that Bahá’ís have issues with sincere Muslims or Islam would be unfounded. Indeed belief in the Prophet and Islam is part of Bahá’í belief, as is defending the integrity of Islam. In this respect he will understand your parents and your own beliefs much better than many, or should do at least. So will be more allied to you than you might as yet fully appreciate.

Bahá’í religious customs are quite simple and many will seek to keep their religious affairs discreet in shared accommodation, like obligatory prayers and such. But like yourself he is likely to bring some of his friends around from time to time.

There is no problems with Bahá’ís eating halal meat, so you could dine together sometimes if you choose. But if you want to ensure there is no cross contamination with his own food this can simply be arranged between you. Unlike some a Bahá’í is very unlikely to switch your food to mock you. Something many Muslim students can face in college environments.

Bahá’ís students tend to do well at college and university and in this respect he should be a positive influence on you compared to some students that focus more on their social activities. Because of this, sharing accommodation with a Bahá’í can pay dividends that you will more fully appreciate when you are older.

As your families originate from Persia you are likely to share much in common with each other. So the experience is likely to be beneficial for both of you. And you will both learn from each other. Therefore do not concern yourself if you know little about the Bahá’í Faith at this time.

If you are concerned oven some issues then the following documentary in Persian was produced independently by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), one of the most respected media bodies in the world. It may help you to understand some issues from a neutral perspective. Do appreciate that the BBC were given special permission by the Bahá’í World Centre to film in some locations were permission has never been granted to journalists before and it also contains some rare film footage of `Abdu’l-Bahá. This documentary also include the passport picture of Bahá’u’lláh, the Founder of the Bahá’í Faith, but this is in the spirit of responsible journalism.

WARNING: For the attention of Bahá’ís the following documentary contains the passport image of Bahá’u’lláh between 8:15 and 8:32, if you wish to advert your eyes.

Baha'is in Iran - YouTube

Naturally no one here could vouch for your room mates character and this you must determine this for yourself. But if your families are meeting each other I would view this as a positive sign.

Here is wishing you every success with your studies.

Earth
 
May 2013
1,786
forest falls california
Most certainly would room

My questions is: Would you, as a follower of the Bahai faith, be willing to be roommates with someone who comes from an Islamic background? or is that an immediate rejection?

Thanks![/QUOTE]

Most certainly I would welcome to be a roommate with a Muslim, and would really hope to learn more about Islam as part of learning about all of the religions. We all need to expand our comfort zones and grow, especially from diversity. The more difference the richer the opportunity.
 
May 2011
507
Australia
If I had any fear at all, in rooming with a muslim person, it would only be based on a slight fear that maybe they might judge me, or could inwardly reject me because of their own beliefs, or any preconceptions they may have.

So, I guess if you are both 'detached' in the spiritual sense, and embrace each other, figuratively speaking, accepting and seeing the value and positivity in your slightly different backgrounds, then I hope and expect you will be good friends!

I almost flatted with an Australian girl who had converted to Islam, but for practical reasons (transport issues), I didn't take the place. It was nice to meet someone who had thought outside the box, and who loved her Faith though.
 
Last edited:
Jul 2011
1,747
n ireland
A true Baha'i would relish the opportunity to talk about God,spirituality and pray together :yes: