New Translations available

Jun 2006
4,319
California
#2
Tony...

I too am very excited about the new translations that are now available online!

Recent Additions – Authoritative Writings and Guidance | Bahá’í Reference Library

One Tablet by Abdul-Baha in particular struck my attention!

Extract from a Tablet of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

"In ancient times the people of America were, through their northern regions, close to Asia, that is, separated from Asia by a strait. For this reason, it hath been said that crossing had occurred. There are other signs which indicate communication.

"As to places whose people were not informed of the appearance of Prophets, such people are excused. In the Qur’án it hath been revealed: “We will not chastise them if they had not been sent a Messenger.”1

"Undoubtedly in those regions the Call of God must have been raised in ancient times, but it hath been forgotten now."


  • 1 Qur’án 17:15
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Sep 2010
4,522
Earth
#3
Tony...

I too am very excited about the new translations that are now available online!

Recent Additions – Authoritative Writings and Guidance | Bahá’í Reference Library

One Tablet by Abdul-Baha in particular struck my attention!

Extract from a Tablet of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

"In ancient times the people of America were, through their northern regions, close to Asia, that is, separated from Asia by a strait. For this reason, it hath been said that crossing had occurred. There are other signs which indicate communication.

"As to places whose people were not informed of the appearance of Prophets, such people are excused. In the Qur’án it hath been revealed: “We will not chastise them if they had not been sent a Messenger.”1


"Undoubtedly in those regions the Call of God must have been raised in ancient times, but it hath been forgotten now."

  • 1 Qur’án 17:15
Great to see you here Arthra

I liked this first one in first document I opened which links with yours;

Additional Tablets, Extracts and Talks | Bahá’í Reference Library

Twelve table talks given by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá in ‘Akká
– 1 –
The Three Kinds of Prophets
1QUESTION: HOW MANY kinds of divine Prophets are there?
2Answer: There are three kinds of divine Prophets. One kind are the universal Manifestations, which are even as the sun. Through Their advent the world of existence is renewed, a new cycle is inaugurated, a new religion is revealed, souls are quickened to a new life, and East and West are flooded with light. These Souls are the universal Manifestations of God and have been sent forth to the entire world and the generality of mankind.
3Another kind of Prophets are followers and promulgators, not leaders and law-givers, but they are nonetheless the recipients of the hidden inspirations of God. Yet another kind are Prophets Whose prophethood has been limited to a particular locality. But the universal Manifestations are all-encompassing: They are like the root, and all others are as the branches; they are like the sun, and all others are as the moon and the stars."

Hope all is well regards Tony
 
Jun 2014
1,081
Wisconsin
#5
"As to thy question: 'To whom should we turn?'—turn thou to the Ancient Beauty. God willing, a copy of His blessed portrait will in due course be dispatched to thee so that when offering prayer thou mayest turn thyself in spirit towards that Holy Likeness, and not towards some mere figment of the imagination. Know thou, however, that at no time should His blessed portrait be hung in the Mashriqu’l-Adhkár."

Woah, that's interesting. I had heard some Baha'is say it is impermissible to keep an image of Baha'u'llah outside of the one at the world center... but this seems to say we should have one for use in prayer, just never in the Mashriqu’l-Adhkár.
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Jul 2017
302
Kettering, Ohio USA
#6
I have an image of Baha'u'llah on m computer, but up to now I have looked at it rarely. I will from now on look at the picture of Baha'u'llah when praying.
 
Sep 2010
4,522
Earth
#7
This is a great one. The world of the future will be different after the mess has been cleaned up!

"Extract from a Tablet of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

The question of economics must commence with the farmer and then be extended to the other classes inasmuch as the number of farmers is far greater than all other classes. Therefore, it is fitting to begin with the farmer in matters related to economics for the farmer is the first active agent in human society. In brief, from among the wise men in every village a board should be set up and the affairs of that village should be under the control of that board. Likewise a general storehouse should be founded with the appointment of a secretary. At the time of the harvest, under the direction of that board, a certain percentage of the entire harvest should be appropriated for the storehouse.
The storehouse has seven revenues: Tithes, taxes on animals, property without an heir, all lost objects found whose owners cannot be traced, one third of all treasure-trove, one third of the produce of all mines, and voluntary contributions.
This storehouse also has seven expenditures:
  1. General running expenses of the storehouse, such as the salary of the secretary and the administration of public health.
  2. Tithes to the government.
  3. Taxes on animals to the government.
  4. Costs of running an orphanage.
  5. Costs of running a home for the incapacitated.
  6. Costs of running a school.
  7. Payment of subsidies to provide needed support of the poor.

The first revenue is the tithe. It should be collected as follows: If, for instance, the income of a person is five hundred dollars and his necessary expenses are the same, no tithes will be collected from him. If another’s expenses are five hundred dollars while his income is one thousand dollars, one tenth will be taken from him, for he hath more than his needs; if he giveth one tenth of the surplus, his livelihood will not be adversely affected. If another’s expenses are one thousand dollars, and his income is five thousand dollars, as he hath four thousand dollars surplus he will be required to give one and a half tenths. If another person hath necessary expenses of one thousand dollars, but his income is ten thousand dollars, from him two tenths will be required for his surplus represents a large sum. But if the necessary expenses of another person are four or five thousand dollars, and his income one hundred thousand, one fourth will be required from him. On the other hand, should a person’s income be two hundred, but his needs absolutely essential for his livelihood be five hundred dollars, and provided he hath not been remiss in his work or his farm hath not been blessed with a harvest, such a one must receive help from the general storehouse so that he may not remain in need and may live in comfort.
A certain amount must be put aside from the general storehouse for the orphans of the village and a certain sum for the incapacitated. A certain amount must be provided from this storehouse for those who are needy and incapable of earning a livelihood, and a certain amount for the village’s system of education. And, a certain amount must be set aside for the administration of public health. If anything is left in the storehouse, that must be transferred to the general treasury of the nation for national expenditures.

Regards Tony
 
Likes: Traveller
May 2018
111
New Zealand
#9
This is a great one. The world of the future will be different after the mess has been cleaned up!

"Extract from a Tablet of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

The question of economics must commence with the farmer and then be extended to the other classes inasmuch as the number of farmers is far greater than all other classes. Therefore, it is fitting to begin with the farmer in matters related to economics for the farmer is the first active agent in human society. In brief, from among the wise men in every village a board should be set up and the affairs of that village should be under the control of that board. Likewise a general storehouse should be founded with the appointment of a secretary. At the time of the harvest, under the direction of that board, a certain percentage of the entire harvest should be appropriated for the storehouse.
The storehouse has seven revenues: Tithes, taxes on animals, property without an heir, all lost objects found whose owners cannot be traced, one third of all treasure-trove, one third of the produce of all mines, and voluntary contributions.
This storehouse also has seven expenditures:
  1. General running expenses of the storehouse, such as the salary of the secretary and the administration of public health.
  2. Tithes to the government.
  3. Taxes on animals to the government.
  4. Costs of running an orphanage.
  5. Costs of running a home for the incapacitated.
  6. Costs of running a school.
  7. Payment of subsidies to provide needed support of the poor.

The first revenue is the tithe. It should be collected as follows: If, for instance, the income of a person is five hundred dollars and his necessary expenses are the same, no tithes will be collected from him. If another’s expenses are five hundred dollars while his income is one thousand dollars, one tenth will be taken from him, for he hath more than his needs; if he giveth one tenth of the surplus, his livelihood will not be adversely affected. If another’s expenses are one thousand dollars, and his income is five thousand dollars, as he hath four thousand dollars surplus he will be required to give one and a half tenths. If another person hath necessary expenses of one thousand dollars, but his income is ten thousand dollars, from him two tenths will be required for his surplus represents a large sum. But if the necessary expenses of another person are four or five thousand dollars, and his income one hundred thousand, one fourth will be required from him. On the other hand, should a person’s income be two hundred, but his needs absolutely essential for his livelihood be five hundred dollars, and provided he hath not been remiss in his work or his farm hath not been blessed with a harvest, such a one must receive help from the general storehouse so that he may not remain in need and may live in comfort.
A certain amount must be put aside from the general storehouse for the orphans of the village and a certain sum for the incapacitated. A certain amount must be provided from this storehouse for those who are needy and incapable of earning a livelihood, and a certain amount for the village’s system of education. And, a certain amount must be set aside for the administration of public health. If anything is left in the storehouse, that must be transferred to the general treasury of the nation for national expenditures.

Regards Tony
This reminded me of something I have been meaning to ask; do any of the current houses of worship have schools , hospitals , orphanages or other such institutes associated with them ?
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Sep 2010
4,522
Earth
#10
This reminded me of something I have been meaning to ask; do any of the current houses of worship have schools , hospitals , orphanages or other such institutes associated with them ?
Not yet.Traveller, though the land is being purchased.

The first ever in ishqabad had started and it was working well. It unfortunatly must have been ahead of its time as it was seized, used for some time as an art gallery and then damaged in an earthquake to be demolished all together.

Baha'i Historical Facts: The Mashriqu'l-Adhkar in 'Ishqabad, extensively damaged by violent earthquakes in 1948, was demolished in 1963 by the Russian authorities for safety reasons

The future will see every town centered around its House of Worship and benevolent institutions.

Regards Tony
 

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