Old Testament God

Jul 2011
1,747
n ireland
#1
In the Book of Genesis, when Moses asked God His name, He replied " I am who am". For me "I am" is the only name for God that makes any sense as it infers that we can never fully know or understand who He is.
 
Sep 2010
4,522
Earth
#2
In the Book of Genesis, when Moses asked God His name, He replied " I am who am". For me "I am" is the only name for God that makes any sense as it infers that we can never fully know or understand who He is.
Though you could be right I am not sure ;)

God bless and regards Tony
 
Apr 2015
211
Las Vegas, Nevada
#3
In the Book of Genesis, when Moses asked God His name, He replied " I am who am". For me "I am" is the only name for God that makes any sense as it infers that we can never fully know or understand who He is.

When I read that as I was reading the bible, I took it as a mistranslation form of "I am, who am". To me, it refers that God dwells within all of us and everything while still being seperated (panentheistic), when it says "who am" I take it as who means everything in existence. I also agree with you, it has multiple meanings as does every single verse in the Bible
 
Mar 2015
42
Switzerland
#7
I think Allah is also a great name. The name itself implies, that there can't be another God, that Allah is THE God.
 
Jun 2014
1,081
Wisconsin
#8
Yep.

Seems to me like God's given us a lot of names to use for him. I Am, Yhwh, El, Elohim, Ellah, Allah, Baha, Ya Baha'u'l-Abha, Vishnu, Ahura Mazda, Tian. And that list is only counting the confirmed Baha'i prophets (and largely ignoring the hundred-or-so names in Islamic tradition because no one here has time to read all those).

I think the point of giving us this deluge of names is to realize no one name can possibly perfectly fit.
 
Jul 2015
75
Berlin, Germany
#9
In the Book of Genesis, when Moses asked God His name, He replied " I am who am". For me "I am" is the only name for God that makes any sense as it infers that we can never fully know or understand who He is.
This is extra complicated now, as English isn't my first language ... so sorry for possible confusion.

When I had Jehova's Witnesses over the other day, they explained to me that "I am who am" is not the best translation of the Hebrew original. They explained this in detail, grammar and all, but as I don't speak Hewbrew, I don't remember the details.

But we checked half a dozen (German) Bible translations, and it indeed seemed like there was a slightly different translation in each of them.

Long story short, "I am the one who will bestow himself on the world", or "the one who will prove himself to the world", or "the one who will be obvious" (German: "Der, der sich erweisen wird") maybe is a better translation.
 
Oct 2014
1,798
Stockholm
#10
In the Book of Genesis, when Moses asked God His name, He replied " I am who am". For me "I am" is the only name for God that makes any sense as it infers that we can never fully know or understand who He is.
I'd say that this is the very essence: God is the One who he/she/it is. All the rest is lengthy elucidations of that statement:

"Blessed is the man that hath acknowledged his belief in God and in His signs, and recognized that 'He shall not be asked of His doings'. Such a recognition hath been made by God the ornament of every belief and its very foundation. Upon it must depend the acceptance of every goodly deed."

gnat
 

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