Personal Favorite messenger?

May 2013
1,773
forest falls california
#51
Oxymoron

I don't really understand what you mean. What ultimate reality that we have to deal with? Why can't people claim what they will about their beliefs? It may be bizarre and may not make sense but if LogicalReason wants to believe he's an atheist Baha'i then fine.
To me, its an oxymoron on steriods (or something) which unravels the very usage and value of the written word. He's having fun, and God loves laughter... ;-)

"Can't we all just get a donut?"

Baha'u'llah, in English, translates, as you well know, into the Glory of "God". Hence, for one who recognizes the Glory of God to disbelieve in the God Whose Glory is made manifest is illogical. (or so Spock told me...)

Its all good. (but I don't believe in good)
 
Jun 2014
726
United States
#52
To me, its an oxymoron on steriods (or something) which unravels the very usage and value of the written word. He's having fun, and God loves laughter... ;-)

"Can't we all just get a donut?"

Baha'u'llah, in English, translates, as you well know, into the Glory of "God". Hence, for one who recognizes the Glory of God to disbelieve in the God Whose Glory is made manifest is illogical. (or so Spock told me...)

Its all good. (but I don't believe in good)
Well people believe things others think are silly all the time, such as avoiding black cats. :p
 
Mar 2013
276
Netherlands
#54
My favourite Messenger (Manifestation of God) is Baha'u'llah. Why? Because I know Him the best and because He's the closest to us in time. Baha'u'llah says that all the Manifestations of God speak with the same voice and sit on the same throne, and in essence they are all one and the same. So in that sense I love them all equally. But only because Baha'u'llah says so! He also says that they each have a unique Mission, and the Mission of Baha'u'llah is the peaceful unification of the human race, and this speaks to me more than any other. It's what I truly believe is needed for this time we live in. And His Writings are so beautiful and rich with inner meaning. And the stories I've read of His life, and the effect He had on people speak to me as well.

All best wishes,

Suzanne
 
Sep 2010
2,106
United Kingdom
#59
As a Christian, I would naturally have to say Jesus.

I admire the fact that He was willing to face torture and death, to expose the innocence not only of himself as the pure "Lamb of God" but, by implication, of all innocent victims throughout history (as he said himself: "all the righteous blood shed on the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel to the blood of Zechariah") who had become scapegoats of baying mobs riled up by self-serving elites to try and pacify their subjects and distract their attention from the real cause of their discontent, societal exploitation.

Jesus willingly sacrificed himself to become a scapegoat for his enemies, rather than abandon His belief in what was true, knowing - I feel - that his perfect innocence and lack of complicity in the false crimes for which He had been accused would be vindicated after his death, as it was when Mary Magdalene re-confirmed the faith of His apostles, and that the knowledge of his death would spread throughout the world, freeing people from the kind of victimization which had resulted in his death.

I admire the fact that even when when being crucified, He still cared about his tormentors and prayed that they might be forgiven for "they knew not what they were doing".

Throughout his life, as recorded in the Gospels, he had demonstrated an hitherto unprecedented concern for the weak, vulnerable and outcasts of society who had no one else to vouch for them, as in this beautiful passage from Luke:


Then Jesus said to the man who had invited Him, “When you host a dinner or a banquet, do not invite your friends or brothers or relatives or rich neighbors. Otherwise, they may invite you in return, and you will be repaid. But when you host a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind, and you will be blessed"


In the end, Jesus died but His enemies won no victory over Him. Instead, through his followers whose lives He had so profoundly transformed, the cross became the subversive symbol of a movement that would go on to utterly dominate the Roman Empire such that by the end of fourth century Jesus was the only "deity" left.

As Abdu'l-Baha explained:


After the Lord Christ suffered, the disciples wept, and gave way to their grief. They thought that their hopes were shattered, and that the Cause was utterly lost, till Mary Magdalene came to them and strengthened them saying: 'Do you mourn the body of Our Lord or His Spirit? If you mourn His Spirit, you are mistaken, for Jesus lives! His Spirit will never leave us!' Thus through her wisdom and encouragement the Cause of Christ was upheld for all the days to come. Her intuition enabled her to grasp the spiritual fact."

(Abdu'l-Baha in London, pp. 104-105)
 
Last edited:
Jul 2017
38
Canada
#60
As a Christian, I would naturally have to say Jesus.

I admire the fact that He was willing to face torture and death, to expose the innocence not only of himself as the pure "Lamb of God" but, by implication, of all innocent victims throughout history (as he said himself: "all the righteous blood shed on the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel to the blood of Zechariah") who had become scapegoats of baying mobs riled up by self-serving elites to try and pacify their subjects and distract their attention from the real cause of their discontent, societal exploitation.

Jesus willingly sacrificed himself to become a scapegoat for his enemies, rather than abandon His belief in what was true, knowing - I feel - that his perfect innocence and lack of complicity in the false crimes for which He had been accused would be vindicated after his death, as it was when Mary Magdalene re-confirmed the faith of His apostles, and that the knowledge of his death would spread throughout the world, freeing people from the kind of victimization which had resulted in his death.

I admire the fact that even when when being crucified, He still cared about his tormentors and prayed that they might be forgiven for "they knew not what they were doing".

Throughout his life, as recorded in the Gospels, he had demonstrated an hitherto unprecedented concern for the weak, vulnerable and outcasts of society who had no one else to vouch for them, as in this beautiful passage from Luke:


Then Jesus said to the man who had invited Him, “When you host a dinner or a banquet, do not invite your friends or brothers or relatives or rich neighbors. Otherwise, they may invite you in return, and you will be repaid. But when you host a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind, and you will be blessed"


In the end, Jesus died but His enemies won no victory over Him. Instead, through his followers whose lives He had so profoundly transformed, the cross became the subversive symbol of a movement that would go on to utterly dominate the Roman Empire such that by the end of fourth century Jesus was the only "deity" left.

As Abdu'l-Baha explained:


After the Lord Christ suffered, the disciples wept, and gave way to their grief. They thought that their hopes were shattered, and that the Cause was utterly lost, till Mary Magdalene came to them and strengthened them saying: 'Do you mourn the body of Our Lord or His Spirit? If you mourn His Spirit, you are mistaken, for Jesus lives! His Spirit will never leave us!' Thus through her wisdom and encouragement the Cause of Christ was upheld for all the days to come. Her intuition enabled her to grasp the spiritual fact."

(Abdu'l-Baha in London, pp. 104-105)

Jesus is pretty dang great, I think we all agree on this :)
 

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