Pure Persian in 'The Tabernacle of Unity'?

Jan 2018
11
United States
Hi Everyone,

I've got a question about the specific use of language in 'The Tabernacle of Unity'. The introduction in my copy states that the tablet was revealed in pure Persian without the usual interjection of Arabic words and phrases that were common at the time, especially in religious writings.

My question: Is the word for God used in the tablet the Arabic 'Allah', or was a Zoroastrian name of God used. I'm guessing that Allah was used, but If not I'm curious what pure Persian name of God was used.

Thanks in advance!
 
Sep 2010
4,604
Normanton, Far North West Queensland
Hi Everyone,

I've got a question about the specific use of language in 'The Tabernacle of Unity'. The introduction in my copy states that the tablet was revealed in pure Persian without the usual interjection of Arabic words and phrases that were common at the time, especially in religious writings.

My question: Is the word for God used in the tablet the Arabic 'Allah', or was a Zoroastrian name of God used. I'm guessing that Allah was used, but If not I'm curious what pure Persian name of God was used.

Thanks in advance!
There are a couple here that can answer your question, I have not seen them for a while. Sorry I can not.

Good to meet you.

Regards Tony
 
Jul 2018
105
Tarshish, bound for Nineveh
I do not read Persian (although as an Arabic reader I could "read" Persian text with low comprehension) and so I have not attempted to see the original Persian text. I do know, however, the pre-Islamic and native Persian word for God, is Khoda and the Zoroastrians also used Ahura Mazda. I would guess one of those two words (if not Allah) was used. Perhaps one of our Persian readers here can confirm what the text used.

Out of curiosity, what made you think if this interesting question?

Cheers
 
Jan 2018
11
United States
Out of curiosity, what made you think if this interesting question?

Cheers[/QUOTE]

Hi Luqman,

I started thinking about this question because the writings of Baha'u'llah have such a strong Islamic quality to them. The writings quote the Quran and make frequent reference to Hadith and the sayings of the Imams and Islamic theologians and mystics. The Tabernacle of Unity is one of the few writings of Baha'u'llah (that I know of) that goes beyond Islamic, and sometimes Christian explanations. In other words all of the writings 'seem' to be addressed to either a Baha'i/Babi, Muslim, Christian, or perhaps faithless audience. The fact that Baha'u'llah would have no problem using a name of God from a non-Abrahamic faith seems important and I am frankly surprised to find this to be the case. I supposed that not using Allah might seem heretical in the historical context, not that Baha'u'llah seemed afraid of being accused of heresy. Perhaps using 'Khoda' was more common that I thought; I am completely ignorant of the details of linguistics in 19th century Persia.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tonyfish58
Dec 2012
206
Earth
Greetings Couch of Heedlessness,

This is a very interesting subject matter because it depends on how well you know Persian history and the type of belief systems that have naturally evolved within it’s lands. Contrary to some western views, Persian Bahá’ís come from a very wide religious ancestry. This certainly includes Zoroastrians, Jews and Christians in addition to Muslims and Bábís. So this has naturally shaped the way in which the Bahá'í Revelation has been presented. Just being aware of this simple fact will help you to read and comprehend the Bahá’í Writings so much better because you will begin to read them in their intended context.

The following link on the Tabernacle of Unity, published on Bahaiblog, might help you to appreciate this subject matter a little more. Like the author, I too have a great admiration for Bahá’ís from Zoroastrian backgrounds. The idea that Persian Bahá’ís evolved from a Shia Islamic background is as much as a prejudice as is the notion that the Bahá’í Faith evolved from Shia Islam. Only when we can come to see the true universality within the Bahá’í Writings will we begin to witness it for what it really is. Enjoy the article and its links An Introduction to The Tabernacle of Unity - Baha'i Blog

Earth
 
  • Like
Reactions: tonyfish58