Responding to Backbiting

Jul 2017
78
Denver, CO
#1
If one is in conversation with a person, and that person backbites against someone else -- what is the proper response?
 
Sep 2017
370
Earth
#2
Great question. I think I have read one must not be involved in hearing backbiting therefore one must say they don't wish to talk about another behind there back without making the other feel like they are wrong for doing so ... However I don't have any quotes so I'm going to go and look for the proof of my statement as I kind of remember reading it
 
Sep 2017
370
Earth
#3
It is obvious that if we listen to those who complain to us about the faults of others we are guilty of complicity in their backbiting. We should therefore, as tactfully as possible, but yet firmly, do our utmost to prevent others from making accusations or complaints against others in our presence.
(Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 93)
 
Oct 2014
1,797
Stockholm
#4
And then we have the conditions of the real world. In my work, which in reality to a large extent is a fight against calumny, backbiting and lies, I am obliged to dig up negative facts about people.

We could take another example, from the real world. If you have certain information, you are more or less obliged to give advice such as "If you work for that person, he is likely to cheat you on your salary and the fruits of your work", or "Be careful with that person: he is known for never paying back his debts."

We also could turn to the example of Abdu'l-Bahá, who referred to the Persian Crown Prince as "ashes". In another case, when a prominent Bahá'í cheated on his wife, the Master informed the wife.

So, as usual, there are no absolute rules. We have to use our own judgment.

Best,

from

gnat
 
Sep 2017
370
Earth
#5
And then we have the conditions of the real world. In my work, which in reality to a large extent is a fight against calumny, backbiting and lies, I am obliged to dig up negative facts about people.

We could take another example, from the real world. If you have certain information, you are more or less obliged to give advice such as "If you work for that person, he is likely to cheat you on your salary and the fruits of your work", or "Be careful with that person: he is known for never paying back his debts."

We also could turn to the example of Abdu'l-Bahá, who referred to the Persian Crown Prince as "ashes". In another case, when a prominent Bahá'í cheated on his wife, the Master informed the wife.

So, as usual, there are no absolute rules. We have to use our own judgment.

Best,

from

gnat
Can u please quote where abdul baha calls the prince ashes .. Thanks as I did not know of that
 
Oct 2014
1,797
Stockholm
#6
Can u please quote where abdul baha calls the prince ashes .. Thanks as I did not know of that
It's a reference to the last Qajar Crown Prince, and can be found in Summon Up Remembrance, by Marzieh Gail, a book about her father, who was a Persian diplomat, a translator of many Bahá'í writings and a secretary of Abdu'l Bahá.

gnat
 
Last edited:
Sep 2017
370
Earth
#7
It's a reference to the last Qajar Crown Prince, and can be found in Summon Up Remembrance, by Marzieh Gail, a book about her father, who was a Persian diplomat, a translator of many Bahá'í writings and a secretary of Abdu'l Bahá.

gnat
Gnat, I have come back to this as I've been thinking about this. Surely we are not supposed to back bite, and this about Abdul Baha is not even authoritative, so can we take this and say there no absolutes to even backbiting?
 

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