Self love is an inherent trait?

Sep 2017
303
Earth
#1
For self-love is kneaded into the very clay of man, and it is not possible that, without any hope of a substantial reward, he should neglect his own present material good. That individual, however, who puts his faith in God and believes in the words of God—because he is promised and certain of a plentiful reward in the next life, and because worldly benefits as compared to the abiding joy and glory of future planes of existence are nothing to him—will for the sake of God abandon his own peace and profit and will freely consecrate his heart and soul to the common good. - Abdul Baha

Did Abdul Baha also have self love or as he was the mystery of God he did not have this trait. It makes me feel quite guilty and not worthy knowing I am a selfish creature forever.
 
#2
Full quote from Ocean Software:


Sincerity is the foundation-stone of faith. That is, a religious individual must disregard his personal desires and seek in whatever way he can wholeheartedly to serve the public interest; and it is impossible for a human being to turn aside from his own selfish advantages and sacrifice his own good for the good of the community except through true religious faith. For self-love is kneaded into the very clay of man, and it is not possible that, without any hope of a substantial reward, he should neglect his own present material 97 good. That individual, however, who puts his faith in God and believes in the words of God -- because he is promised and certain of a plentiful reward in the next life, and because worldly benefits as compared to the abiding joy and glory of future planes of existence are nothing to him -- will for the sake of God abandon his own peace and profit and will freely consecrate his heart and soul to the common good. "A man, too, there is who selleth his very self out of desire to please God."[1]
[1 Qur'án 2:203.]

(Abdu'l-Baha, The Secret of Divine Civilization, p. 96)
Interesting because I use to think just by virtue of praying and meditating hard enough God would transform me into super Rambo Wolverine Bullet Proof Superhero who could kick ass all the elitist bad guys who don't give a damn about the common good, but have a lot of material wealth and charisma.
 
Jul 2017
287
Olympia, WA, USA
#3
For self-love is kneaded into the very clay of man, and it is not possible that, without any hope of a substantial reward, he should neglect his own present material good. That individual, however, who puts his faith in God and believes in the words of God—because he is promised and certain of a plentiful reward in the next life, and because worldly benefits as compared to the abiding joy and glory of future planes of existence are nothing to him—will for the sake of God abandon his own peace and profit and will freely consecrate his heart and soul to the common good. - Abdul Baha

Did Abdul Baha also have self love or as he was the mystery of God he did not have this trait. It makes me feel quite guilty and not worthy knowing I am a selfish creature forever.
Thanks for sharing that quote. I hate to think that I only do what I do for a reward in the afterlife. Moreover, the Bab said we should not do what we do for a reward in the afterlife. However, since we know we will get a reward, it is difficult to know our real motives for what we do. I like to think I do what i do because Baha'u'llah said to do it, which consists of giving up anything i might otherwise want from myself to post on forms, mostly to atheists but sometimes to those of other faiths. But I worry that I might have another motive that is subconscious. I cannot think of what that motive would be, other than as a distraction from other things I should be doing, material world duties I often neglect.

On another note, an atheist I post to that I have known for a long time and i consider a friend cannot understand why I am willing to give up things of the flesh and I really cannot explain it to him so that he understands it. It is not that I could not have them and still be a Baha'i under the Law; it is that I have absolutely no interest in anything for myself anymore. I do love my cats but I do not consider that selfish, especially because I endure so much grief for them.

The ironic thing is that I do not really even like God most of the time so my husband wonders why I keep teaching the faith. The only answer I have is that I believe it is the right thing to do because I do believe in Baha'ullah and what He enjoined us to do and the most meritorious of all deeds is teaching the Faith.

I do not know what to do about how I feel about God, it is very painful, yet I cannot deny how I feel and still be honest. I think that God is cruel, not loving, because of the suffering I have endured and the suffering others endure. I cannot logically accommodate an omnipotent God who is loving and allows so much suffering because it makes no sense to me. It does not help me to read what Baha'u'llah wrote about God. The buck stops with God because He created a world that is a storehouse of suffering, more for some than for others.

Whenever something good happens it is difficult for me to give credit to God like so many believers do because it makes no sense to attribute only the good things to God and not the bad things. If God is responsible for everything because it has been preordained then God is responsible for both good and bad. Where does free will fit into this picture, if everything is already written on the Tablet of Fate?
 
Aug 2014
1,346
Blue Planet
#4
Thanks for sharing that quote. I hate to think that I only do what I do for a reward in the afterlife. Moreover, the Bab said we should not do what we do for a reward in the afterlife. However, since we know we will get a reward, it is difficult to know our real motives for what we do. I like to think I do what i do because Baha'u'llah said to do it, which consists of giving up anything i might otherwise want from myself to post on forms, mostly to atheists but sometimes to those of other faiths. But I worry that I might have another motive that is subconscious. I cannot think of what that motive would be, other than as a distraction from other things I should be doing, material world duties I often neglect.

On another note, an atheist I post to that I have known for a long time and i consider a friend cannot understand why I am willing to give up things of the flesh and I really cannot explain it to him so that he understands it. It is not that I could not have them and still be a Baha'i under the Law; it is that I have absolutely no interest in anything for myself anymore. I do love my cats but I do not consider that selfish, especially because I endure so much grief for them.

The ironic thing is that I do not really even like God most of the time so my husband wonders why I keep teaching the faith. The only answer I have is that I believe it is the right thing to do because I do believe in Baha'ullah and what He enjoined us to do and the most meritorious of all deeds is teaching the Faith.

I do not know what to do about how I feel about God, it is very painful, yet I cannot deny how I feel and still be honest. I think that God is cruel, not loving, because of the suffering I have endured and the suffering others endure. I cannot logically accommodate an omnipotent God who is loving and allows so much suffering because it makes no sense to me. It does not help me to read what Baha'u'llah wrote about God. The buck stops with God because He created a world that is a storehouse of suffering, more for some than for others.

Whenever something good happens it is difficult for me to give credit to God like so many believers do because it makes no sense to attribute only the good things to God and not the bad things. If God is responsible for everything because it has been preordained then God is responsible for both good and bad. Where does free will fit into this picture, if everything is already written on the Tablet of Fate?
i love your honesty here. you know,I think even God enjoys your honesty (speaking symbolically). maybe He sometimes tell to His angels "look, that one is my honest human. is he not lovely?" and angels nod in agreement with a smile :D
 
Sep 2010
4,362
Normanton Far North Queensland
#5
i love your honesty here. you know,I think even God enjoys your honesty (speaking symbolically). maybe He sometimes tell to His angels "look, that one is my honest human. is he not lovely?" and angels nod in agreement with a smile :D
Is She not lovely ;)

Regards Tony
 
Jul 2017
287
Olympia, WA, USA
#6
i love your honesty here. you know,I think even God enjoys your honesty (speaking symbolically). maybe He sometimes tell to His angels "look, that one is my honest human. is he not lovely?" and angels nod in agreement with a smile :D
Thanks, but I figure God already knows how I feel so what's the worst that can happen, that other people find out? :rolleyes:
Besides, there is always the off chance that someone else will have felt the same things and understand how I feel and be able to help, or that I might be able to help someone else by sharing, although I highly doubt any Baha'i feels like me because most people would not still be a Baha'i if they felt the way I do about God. :(
I am not one to give up on anything though... I just keep trying to change my attitude. :eek:
 

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