what does it mean to 'forget ourselves'

Aug 2014
1,368
Blue Planet
#2
In my view, it means to forget one's desires. Desires make us have an identity which is most of the time different from the one God wills for us. Desires lead us towards mortal or venial sins or imperfections; none of them is desired by God and thus we insist on something which WE like.
Thus to forget oneself is to have the same will as God's. As long as we are we, and He is He, He cannot come to our hearts because "Hid will and the Will of others cannot live in one heart."
 
Sep 2010
4,461
Normanton Far North Queensland
#3
The writings sometimes say to forget ourselves, what does this actually mean?
I would also add that it is trying to be always mindful of God, as the world draws our mind away often.

When working, it is a great bounty to know that when we do it in the spirit of service, that it is worship, thus our daily grind can be prayer. 😊

Regards Tony
 
Mar 2015
216
Bend area, Oregon
#4
Yousefy2:

Perhaps reflection of the following words of Bahá'u'lláh and 'Abdu'l-Bahá may be helpful to you as you ponder the deeper meanings within your spiritual question (post number 1):

"O SON OF MAN! If thou lovest Me, turn away from thyself; and if thou seekest My pleasure, regard not thine own; that thou mayest die in Me and I may eternally live in thee." Hidden Words from the Arabic, Number 7)

“Until a being setteth his foot in the plane of sacrifice, he is bereft of every favour and grace; and this plane of sacrifice is the realm of dying to the self, that the radiance of the living God may then shine forth. The martyr’s field is the place of detachment from self, that the anthems of eternity may be upraised. Do all ye can to become wholly weary of self, and bind yourselves to that Countenance of Splendours; and once ye have reached such heights of servitude, ye will find, gathered within your shadow, all created things. This is boundless grace; this is the highest sovereignty; this is the life that dieth not. All else save this is at the last but manifest perdition and great loss.” (Selections from the Writings of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, pp. 76-77)

-LR
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Oct 2014
1,794
Stockholm
#5
“Until a being setteth his foot in the plane of sacrifice, he is bereft of every favour and grace; and this plane of sacrifice is the realm of dying to the self, that the radiance of the living God may then shine forth. The martyr’s field is the place of detachment from self, that the anthems of eternity may be upraised. Do all ye can to become wholly weary of self, and bind yourselves to that Countenance of Splendours; and once ye have reached such heights of servitude, ye will find, gathered within your shadow, all created things. This is boundless grace; this is the highest sovereignty; this is the life that dieth not. All else save this is at the last but manifest perdition and great loss.” (Selections from the Writings of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, pp. 76-77)

Oh, those wonderful quotes from that book! I spent a few months translating that book. That was a truly life-changing experience.

It takes a minute to read and a lifetime to practice.

Best,

from

gnat
 
Jul 2017
341
Olympia, WA, USA
#6
“Until a being setteth his foot in the plane of sacrifice, he is bereft of every favour and grace; and this plane of sacrifice is the realm of dying to the self, that the radiance of the living God may then shine forth. The martyr’s field is the place of detachment from self, that the anthems of eternity may be upraised. Do all ye can to become wholly weary of self, and bind yourselves to that Countenance of Splendours; and once ye have reached such heights of servitude, ye will find, gathered within your shadow, all created things. This is boundless grace; this is the highest sovereignty; this is the life that dieth not. All else save this is at the last but manifest perdition and great loss.” (Selections from the Writings of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, pp. 76-77)

Oh, those wonderful quotes from that book! I spent a few months translating that book. That was a truly life-changing experience.

It takes a minute to read and a lifetime to practice.
Thanks, and I am glad to see you did not vacate the premises. :D
Oh, how different Abdu'l-Baha writes about self than the average psychologist....;)
You know which one I am going to listen to.....
 
Likes: tonyfish58
Jun 2014
1,061
Wisconsin
#7
I think it means to forget all aspects of ourselves that aren't the parts of ourselves created in God's image. Everything but our true self, not the self defined by our attachments and identities. If that makes any sense.
 
Feb 2019
70
Chicago
#8
The writings sometimes say to forget ourselves, what does this actually mean?
We call ourselves human beings but in reality we are souls incarnate in human bodies. Having incarnate in human bodies, we identify ourselves with gender, race, family, religion, nationality etc. The identity the human body and the environment impose upon us is a false one and we forget our real identity as a soul made in the image of God. The soul has no gender, race, religion or nationality. So essentially a human being has dual identity. One springing out of human nature which is a false and imperfect one and the other rooted in the Divine nature of the soul which is a true and perfect one. When we are asked to forget ourselves, it means that we should try not to identify ourselves with the false identity born of human nature when we conduct our affairs in this world. Instead, we ought to connect with the soul within us and act in accordance with the soul guidance received through deep prayer or meditation. Human nature is animal nature and soul's nature is spiritual and divine. Abdul Baha said that anyone that does not meditate is worse than an animal. Those who meditate and act through soul guidance can become like Gandhi and those who act out of human nature and identify with race and religion can act like Hitler.
 
Likes: unevenpants
Feb 2019
70
Chicago
#9
In man there are two natures; his spiritual or higher nature and his material or lower nature. In one he approaches God, in the other he lives for the world alone. Signs of both these natures are to be found in men. In his material aspect he expresses untruth, cruelty and injustice; all these are the outcome of his lower nature. The attributes of his Divine nature are shown forth in love, mercy, kindness, truth and justice, one and all being expressions of his higher nature. Every good habit, every noble quality belongs to man’s spiritual nature, whereas all his imperfections and sinful actions are born of his material nature. If a man’s Divine nature dominates his human nature, we have a saint. Man has the power both to do good and to do evil; if his power for good predominates and his inclinations to do wrong are conquered, then man in truth may be called a saint. But if, on the contrary, he rejects the things of God and allows his evil passions to conquer him, then he is no better than a mere animal.
(‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Paris Talks, p. 60)
 

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