What does this hidden word mean

Sep 2017
371
Earth
#1
O MY SERVANT! Free thyself from the fetters of this world, and loose thy soul from the prison of self. Seize thy chance, for it will come to thee no more.

If we can make up for lost opportunities in the next world, and progress by pleading to God.. what does this mean?
 
Mar 2019
30
Senegal
#2
To free our ourselves, our inner self, from the chains of the world and the self. We have the chance to do this, every moment. But after every moment, that moment is gone and we have another chance.

Inner and outer worlds... both seen and unseen worlds.
There is the apparent inner world of our ego, the self. There is the hidden inner world, of the soul, or true self - the inner "I" / eye, perceiving the things of the outer world and observing the self and all that happens to it.
There is the apparent outer world of material things and space all around us. Then there are unseen outer worlds, what happens underground, in outer space, on a microscopic level, and on macroscopic levels. And in other realms unknown and perhaps unknowable.

The chains of this limited visible world are visible self are always there in this life, holding us back from complete oneness. But the chances for freedom into the hidden inner and outer worlds are there in the sequence. Grab your chance when it comes, for it (that chance) will come to thee no more.
 
Jul 2017
421
Olympia, WA, USA
#4
O MY SERVANT! Free thyself from the fetters of this world, and loose thy soul from the prison of self. Seize thy chance, for it will come to thee no more.

If we can make up for lost opportunities in the next world, and progress by pleading to God.. what does this mean?
We can plead to God in the next world, but there is no guarantee God will have mercy upon us and help us...
If it was that easy, there would be no reason for any of Baha'u'llah's injunctions.
"Seize thy chance, for it will come to thee no more" means we better seize our chance while we are still alive in this world.
 
Sep 2017
371
Earth
#6
But there is no guarantee that God will do it for us... God might choose to help us or not, just like in this world.
Although this is a pilgrims note - Question was asked Abdul Baha if any soul was annihilated/ He answered “No, it will be placed in different conditions by God’s Mercy, and will eventually progress.”
 
Jul 2017
421
Olympia, WA, USA
#7
Although this is a pilgrims note - Question was asked Abdul Baha if any soul was annihilated/ He answered “No, it will be placed in different conditions by God’s Mercy, and will eventually progress.”
I was aware that no soul is never annihilated but I was not aware that it will eventually progress. I guess that blows the idea of an eternal lake of fire out of the water. I never liked that belief anyway. What I wonder about is if bad people are ever punished. Baha'u'llah seems to indicate that, but exactly HOW they are punished, if by God or rather by their own realizations, remains a mystery.

So, if God is SO merciful, why doesn't he help people who are struggling to do good while they are still living in THIS world? :think: Why do some people suffer so much more than others through no fault of their own while other people hardly suffer at all? :think: If you answer suffering is for their own perfection, I already heard that and I consider it religious apologetics. I am sorry but I cannot believe God is All-Loving because it does not correlate with what I SEE in the world. :rolleyes: Sure, I accept that there things that we cannot understand but how is that Justice to expect us to believe what we cannot SEE or understand simply because it says it in a book? :confused: That does not work for me anymore. My husband says that if I cannot believe God is Loving I am not really a Baha'i and I should become an atheist but I still believe in Baha'u'llah so I am kind of stuck. :(
 
Sep 2017
371
Earth
#8
I was aware that no soul is never annihilated but I was not aware that it will eventually progress. I guess that blows the idea of an eternal lake of fire out of the water. I never liked that belief anyway. What I wonder about is if bad people are ever punished. Baha'u'llah seems to indicate that, but exactly HOW they are punished, if by God or rather by their own realizations, remains a mystery.

So, if God is SO merciful, why doesn't he help people who are struggling to do good while they are still living in THIS world? :think: Why do some people suffer so much more than others through no fault of their own while other people hardly suffer at all? :think: If you answer suffering is for their own perfection, I already heard that and I consider it religious apologetics. I am sorry but I cannot believe God is All-Loving because it does not correlate with what I SEE in the world. :rolleyes: Sure, I accept that there things that we cannot understand but how is that Justice to expect us to believe what we cannot SEE or understand simply because it says it in a book? :confused: That does not work for me anymore. My husband says that if I cannot believe God is Loving I am not really a Baha'i and I should become an atheist but I still believe in Baha'u'llah so I am kind of stuck. :(
I guess it's a bit of a mystery, in the priceless pearl ruhiyyih khanum says she does not understand how God can put shoghi effendi through so much suffering. Your a Bahá'í, if you believe you are, none has the right to take that away from you
 
Jun 2014
1,081
Wisconsin
#9
O MY SERVANT! Free thyself from the fetters of this world, and loose thy soul from the prison of self. Seize thy chance, for it will come to thee no more.
I assume the piece in question is "Seize thy chance, for it will come to thee no more."??

I think the "chance" referred to in the above verse would correspond to event described in the verse "And if, by the help of God, he findeth on this journey a trace of the traceless Friend, and inhaleth the fragrance of the long-lost Joseph from the heavenly messenger" from the Seven Valleys.

I don't think this line would apply to being alive versus being dead. My thinking is that Seven Valleys mentions that in the Valley of Search one can pontentially seek for "a hundred thousand years" without finding even a trace of God, so when I see the line "Seize thy chance" I don't think that the chance in question is something that can only come in this lifetime, as according to Valleys one can seek for one hundred thousand years before coming across that chance, and obviously one would be dead if they were seeking that long.

Also obviously that "chance" for someone who dies in infancy would not be an event that happens in their lifetime. So I'd state that it must be a certainty, even, that while some of us will encounter this chance when we are living, some of us will also encounter this chance only when we are dead.

So, if God is SO merciful, why doesn't he help people who are struggling to do good while they are still living in THIS world? :think:
This seems slightly off-topic, so perhaps we should move this particular discussion to a thread of its own.

To address this issue, I'd first have to begin by asking the question: why is suffering bad??

Why do some people suffer so much more than others through no fault of their own while other people hardly suffer at all? :think:
I understand that you don't like the answer that suffering may be necessity, but the idea that suffering or pain is a necessary step for personal development across all religious traditions and most of the psychological disciplines that I am aware of. I'm not 100% sure why this is the case, as of yet, but I see it argued as an important part of human development cross-culturally by a wide variety of people, from religious leaders, to atheist psychologists.

My question in response to this particular question would be: Have you ever met someone before who "hardly suffers at all??" How often have you encountered such a person who lives such a privileged life who you would describe as a good or moral person??

To my eyes it seems like those raised in positions of privilege are the ones disadvantaged to those more accustomed to suffering, often found with an air of entitlement and presumed self-importance and deservedness merely for their self-existence.

I have an example that I will try to give without straying into the territory of fault-finding, and if I accidentally overstep this boundary please feel free to call me on it...

When growing up my parents were close friends with two other couples, each with children of their own. As it happened, of these three families, one was lower class, one was middle class, and one was upper class.

Of the lower and middle class families, all children save for one (who is the youngest) are now either gainfully employed or finishing up schooling. A majority of these either are now homeowners or are making great progress in saving up money to buy a house.

Of the upper class families, the children are still struggling through schooling, taking frequent breaks with schooling and even taking whole years off of education, and neither of which has held a real career, this all despite being among the oldest of all the children of all three families.

With that in mind, I must wonder who of the children was truly born into a more advantageous position??

If you answer suffering is for their own perfection, I already heard that and I consider it religious apologetics.
I have not yet seen apologetics providing a coherent argument for why "suffering is bad" that doesn't collapse upon further scrutiny. Almost always I see arguments built upon the assumption that suffering is a bad thing and undesirable without offering any proof or foundational logic to build up to that conclusion.

Which is not unreasonable, since it seems intuitive to us as humans that suffering is bad and so we often assume this is true without questioning what logic proves that claim. But in order to truly establish whether or not something is true, we need to cast aside assumptions and intuition and try to logically analyze the truth or falsity of the claim.

So to be of best use for this discussion, I will need you to present your argument for why suffering is a bad thing in the first place. Without knowing if this is just an asserted truth or if it is a sound argument on its own, it is hard to address any logical argument built upon the "suffering is bad" axiom.

I am sorry but I cannot believe God is All-Loving because it does not correlate with what I SEE in the world. :rolleyes: Sure, I accept that there things that we cannot understand but how is that Justice to expect us to believe what we cannot SEE or understand simply because it says it in a book? :confused:
When we cannot see the perfection of the world, Baha'u'llah tells us to refer to this verse from the Quran: "Repeat the gaze: Seest thou a single flaw?" (67:3) ("Repeat the gaze" being sort of an archaic way of saying "Look again")

You believe you have identified a flaw in the existence of suffering, and so I invite you to look again, and explain why it is you believe suffering to be a flaw in the first place. Why is it that suffering is bad??

That does not work for me anymore. My husband says that if I cannot believe God is Loving I am not really a Baha'i and I should become an atheist but I still believe in Baha'u'llah so I am kind of stuck. :(
Well I think he's incorrect. Even if you disagree with God on the topic of suffering's existence, why should that have any bearing on your belief in the existence of God?? I'm sure you acknowledge the existence of plenty of other people who you disagree with on some topic or other.

Like I think it evident that you and I probably disagree on the topic of whether or not suffering is necessary, does that mean you must become an awalrusist and cease believing in my existence?? :p
 
Jul 2017
421
Olympia, WA, USA
#10
I guess it's a bit of a mystery, in the priceless pearl ruhiyyih khanum says she does not understand how God can put shoghi effendi through so much suffering.
So I am not the only one who wonders about these things? I was a bit reticent to post what I did but now I am glad I did. :)
Your a Bahá'í, if you believe you are, none has the right to take that away from you
Thanks. Yes, I know that, and my husband is not trying to take that away, he just questions if I really believe in Baha'u'llah, since (a) I do not believe that God is All-Loving, and (b) I do not love God. But where did Baha'u'llah say that it is a requirement that we (a) believe that God is All-Loving or (b) love God, in order to be a Baha'i?

I do not recall reading that. God does not need our love, loving God is for our own benefit.

5: O SON OF BEING! Love Me, that I may love thee. If thou lovest Me not, My love can in no wise reach thee. Know this, O servant.
The Hidden Words of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 4
 
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