Will there more opportunities for evil people after this life?

Apr 2017
196
Mexico
#1
Hi friends

Considering the Bahai doctrine on the immortality of human soul, I would like to know what is the Bahai stance on the fate of people who in this life show a systematic, deliberate rejection of all that is good and divine.

Will their souls find successive chances for repentance after this life, or is this their only chance and will spend eternity away from God?
 
Oct 2014
1,781
Stockholm
#2
Good question. Maybe there are career opportunities over there - like becoming a dark angel, a demon or just an ordinary evil spirit. :)

Best

from

gnat
 
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Apr 2017
196
Mexico
#3
:D

Yes, indeed! :D

Now, the bottom of the question is whether you can't get too evil as to close the opportunities to learn.

This is not only important for really evil people like the torturers of bahais in Iran or of Jews in Nazi Germany... it is important for people like you and me who are common sinners.
Can I have the assurance that, whatever my current flaws, I can still advance in eternal life?

For example, I was not as good father. I spent with my daughters less time that I should... I was not a role model. My daughters are now 22 and 21 and their character is already formed, for good and bad.
I am now 50. If I die tomorrow out of a heart attack, for example, I don't know whether I will have any chance in eternity to learn how to become a good father or I basically missed my chance.

My reasoning is that, since there is no reincarnation, this life is what I get.
But then, will I get over my defficient fatherhood someway, someday? In Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol", after being comended by three spirits, Scrooge finds himself still alive and with a new chance to love. He then rejoices in his new, incredible opportunity, and starts hopping and laughing as a child.
I want the kind of chance Dickens gave his character.
But how can I repent from being a bad father, if I have no way to prove to the Lord I have repented?

Maybe the Lord needs no proof, because He will know I understand the cause of my sin and feel sorry for it.
But, is it all about understanding and feelings?
If so, then any sinner (say, a murderer) will have an eternity to learn why he sinned, understand their errors, feel pain and then repent.​

In few words, if you have an eternity to spend in the hereafter, and a Merciful God, all mankind will in the end, sooner or later, come to the Light with pure heart.

In the big picture, in the divine scale of things, maybe there is no "true evil" but sort of temporary blindness. There is no everlasting hell, but a transient deviation from the Divine Path.

What do you think?
 
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Mar 2013
526
Edwardsville, Illinois, USA
#4
There are many references in the Baha'i Writings to the subject of the condition of the soul in the next world, and how we should prepare ourselves while we are alive in this world. Baha'u'llah and Abdul-Baha also talk about how God is merciful and can forgive sins even at the hour of death, and that we can pray for those who have died so they can advance in the next world. That shows progress is possible even after death. Here is one reference, there are many others:
Bahá'í Reference Library - Some Answered Questions, Pages 241-243
 
Apr 2017
196
Mexico
#5
Thank you, Jcc, for this reference.


There are so many references to the unfathomable mercifulness of God, that I am inclined to believe that, at some point of our eternal progress, we all ( I mean, all) will come to participate fully of his Beauty and Oneness.

I must admit, though, that this brings a potential problem: if given enough time I will progress anyway, why to bother in developing my character on this Earth?

If I was created to know and workship God, and if I will sooner or later come to know Him and workship Him, why to bother to start doing it on this mortal life?

It would seem more reasonable to think that this life presents unique opportunities of learning that necessarily require a body, and that if not seized, I will indeed MISS and never ever see again. Therefore, this short bodily life is as important and precious as the eternal spiritual afterlife.

What do you all think of this?
 
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Sep 2012
306
Panama
#6
...more reasonable to think that this life presents unique opportunities of learning that necessarily require a body, and that if not seized, I will indeed MISS and never ever see again...
That's what I've gotten from the Sacred Texts, the idea that our life on this plane is analogous to that of our life as a fetus on our mothers, and how we developed there affected enormously our lives here. Likewise our development here will have a tremendous affect on the next.

Carrying the analogy further we consider that as our experiances here would be incomprehensible to an unborn child, likewise the nature of the next world is far beyond our ken.
 
Feb 2016
70
United States
#7
In Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol", after being comended by three spirits, Scrooge finds himself still alive and with a new chance to love. He then rejoices in his new, incredible opportunity, and starts hopping and laughing as a child.
I want the kind of chance Dickens gave his character.
Actually, you DO have the chance that Dickens gave his character. You have today. You have this moment. You can change, if you choose. And do NOT wait to be visited by three spirits! It is a huge mistake to wait for something so dramatic, especially when you are already clearly aware of a problem.

What really happened to Scrooge? Do you think he spent the end of his life worrying about all that he had done or failed to do? Or did he rejoice in the chance to make the most of the days he had left? I think it was the latter. That was the whole point of the story.

Your children are still your children, and they will never stop being your children. Be the best father you can be today, right now. Learn from the mistakes you feel you've made, but don't let regret cripple you. Do what you can. It may take time and effort, but if you sincerely try I hope you will feel absolved of any lingering regret. Remember, too, that if you feel you missed your chance with your own children, there are always grandchildren. But again, if you want the chance to be a good grandfather, it will be much easier to do by being the best father you can be today...
 
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Jul 2014
831
colorado/summer-Oklahoma/winter
#8
That's what I've gotten from the Sacred Texts, the idea that our life on this plane is analogous to that of our life as a fetus on our mothers, and how we developed there affected enormously our lives here. Likewise our development here will have a tremendous affect on the next.

Carrying the analogy further we consider that as our experiances here would be incomprehensible to an unborn child, likewise the nature of the next world is far beyond our ken.
Yes!
 
Oct 2013
697
Glenwood, Queensland, Australia
#10
Hi friends

Considering the Bahai doctrine on the immortality of human soul, I would like to know what is the Bahai stance on the fate of people who in this life show a systematic, deliberate rejection of all that is good and divine.

Will their souls find successive chances for repentance after this life, or is this their only chance and will spend eternity away from God?
The people of Bahá, who are the inmates of the Ark of God, are, one and all, well aware of one another’s state and condition, and are united in the bonds of intimacy and fellowship. Such a state, however, must depend upon their faith and their conduct. They that are of the same grade and station are fully aware of one another’s capacity, character, accomplishments and merits. They that are of a lower grade, however, are incapable of comprehending adequately the station, or of estimating the merits, of those that rank above them. Each shall receive his share from thy Lord. Blessed is the man that hath turned his face towards God, and walked steadfastly in His love, until his soul hath winged its flight unto God, the Sovereign Lord of all, the Most Powerful, the Ever-Forgiving, the All-Merciful.
The souls of the infidels, however, shall—and to this I bear witness—when breathing their last be made aware of the good things that have escaped them, and shall bemoan their plight, and shall humble themselves before God. They shall continue doing so after the separation of their souls from their bodies.

It is clear and evident that all men shall, after their physical death, estimate the worth of their deeds, and realize all that their hands have wrought. I swear by the Day Star that shineth above the horizon of Divine power! They that are the followers of the one true God shall, the moment they depart out of this life, experience such joy and gladness as would be impossible to describe, while they that live in error shall be seized with such fear and trembling, and shall be filled with such consternation, as nothing can exceed. Well is it with him that hath quaffed the choice and incorruptible wine of faith through the gracious favor and the manifold bounties of Him Who is the Lord of all Faiths....

Gleanings, p. 169.

And elsewhere:

And now concerning thy question regarding the soul of man and its survival after death. Know thou of a truth that the soul, after its separation from the body, will continue to progress until it attaineth the presence of God, in a state and condition which neither the revolution of ages and centuries, nor the changes and chances of this world, can alter.
Gleanings, p. 155

One strongly suggests reading what follows this quote. Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá?u?lláh. This excerpt, however, seems to imply that all souls will continue to progress, and that implication appears, to these eyes, to be borne out, by implication, in much else in the Writings - Baha'u'llah and 'Abdu'l-Baha. Of course, it must be accepted that this is one's own view, and that it is quite possible that it may be wrong.

With warmest greetings

Romane
 

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